Home
overview

In recent years pharmaceutical R&D productivity has been experiencing decline despite increased research and development spending. Consequently companies have come to rely on the latest screening methods and technologies available allowing researchers to effectively conduct hundreds of scientific experiments at once. Ten years ago high throughput screening was regarded as the potential saviour of drug discovery, but in reality HTS and uHTS have not lived up to their hype- why is this and what can still be achieved with the use of these assays?

SMi’s 4th Annual Conference, High Throughput Screening – The Application of HTS in current and Future Drug Discovery’ will provide attendees with the latest insight into this important application, covering market dynamics, improved technologies and thoughts for the future. Learn how to deal with critical bottlenecks and other issues reducing the efficiency of the drug discovery process through the use and application of better high throughput screening methods and tools. Further the conference will address how HTS-based lead generation can be made to deliver, the benefits of this application and where the industry will be in the next 5 years. Additional key issues to be addressed by leading experts in the industry include, opportunities for in silico screening, the screening of protein-protein interactions and data analysis and mining. A must attend event for those wishing to improve the drug discovery productivity!

Speakers at the 2006 event include:

  • Dr Jefferson Paslay, Vice President, Screening Science, Wyeth
  • Dr Jonathan Mason, Executive Director, Medicinal Informatics, Structure & Design, Pfizer
  • Dr Lorenz Mayr, Executive Director, BioChemical Assay Development & Screening, Novartis
  • Dr Gregory Kaczorowski, Senior Director, Ion Channel Department, Merck
  • Dr David Keeling, Director, Lead Generation Biology, AstraZeneca
  • Dr Mary Jo Wildey, Senior Research Fellow; Screening & Compound Logistics Centre Team Lead, Johnson & Johnson
  • Dr Alexander Hillisch, Director, Medicinal Chemistry & Head, Computational Chemistry, Bayer Healthcare
  • Dr Dominique Besson, HTS Services Group Leader, Serono

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Lorenz Mayr

Lorenz Mayr, Executive Director, BioChemical Assay Development & Screening, Novartis

9:10 THE HIGH THROUGHPUT MARKET

Mary Jo Wildey

Mary Jo Wildey, Senior Research Fellow; Screening & Compound Logistics Center Lead, Johnson & Johnson PRI

  • Overview of High Throughput Screening (HTS) and
  • Its impact on the pharmaceutical industry
  • The importance of HTS
  • The current opportunities and limitations
  • The future of HTS – how will HTS progress over the next 5 years?
  • 9:50 THE APPLICATION OF HTS IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    David Keeling

    David Keeling, Director, Lead Generation Biology, AstraZeneca

  • Keeping HTS efficient
  • Tracking success downstream
  • The benefits of HTS-based drug discovery
  • Future challenges
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 HTS AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE EARLY DRUG DISCOVERY PROCESS

    Jefferson Paslay

    Jefferson Paslay, Vice President, Screening Sciences, Wyeth Research

  • Scaling HTS operations to meet organisational requirements
  • Successful partnerships across the organisation for HTS success
  • Alignment of HTS priorities with discovery goals
  • HTS data deliverables that enable rapid progression of projects
  • Investing in HTS related technologies that add value
  • 11:30 HOW DOES HTS DELIVER VALUE IN LEAD GENERATION?

    Frank Brown

    Frank Brown, Senior Research Fellow, Johnson & Johnson

  • Optimising the use of HTS
  • Ensuring quality and reproducibility in HTS
  • Realising the value and investment of each section
  • Developing a high quality hit list
  • Setting the proper goals and metrics for HTS
  • 12:10 LEARNING FROM OUR MISTAKES

    Dominique Besson

    Dominique Besson, HTS Services Group Leader, Serono Pharmaceutical Research Institute

  • Corporate compound collections, an historic view
  • Leadlike, druglike? Enriching corporate compound files
  • Success through compound selection
  • HTS and ADME
  • How our processes drive physico-chemical properties
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:20 HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING STRATEGIES FOR DISCOVERING ION CHANNEL DRUGS

    Gregory Kaczorowski

    Gregory Kaczorowski, Director Department of Membrane Biochemistry & Biophysics, Merck Research Laboratories

  • Types of ion channel high throughput screens
  • Configuring fluorescence-based assays
  • Methods for triggering ion channel activity in HTS
  • Automated electrophysiology
  • Types of ion channel high throughput screens
  • Configuring fluorescence-based assays
  • Methods for triggering ion channel activity in HTS
  • Automated electrophysiology
  • 15:00 THE IMPACT OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES ON ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY-BASED SCREENING STRATEGIES FOR ION CHANNEL TARGETS

    Andrew Southan

    Andrew Southan, Head, Ion Channel Pharmacology, BioFocus Plc

  • Historical strategies
  • Introduction of new electrophysiology-based technology
  • Role of focused libraries
  • Preliminary data
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 IN SILICO SCREENING

    Alexander Hillisch

    Alexander Hillisch, Director, Medicinal Chemistry & Head, Computational Chemistry, Bayer Healthcare

  • Reviewing the techniques – ligand and target-based in silico screening
  • Protein structure information as a prerequisite for high throughput docking
  • Hit-list processing – combining potency and ADMET aspects
  • Problems and success stories
  • 16:40 MICROFLUIDICS

  • The screening dilemma: more spending, more screening, more technologies have delivered relatively low success
  • High throughput or high output? The landscape is changing
  • Faster, high fidelity data is the new goal for screeners = less failures in the clinic
  • 75% of top pharmaceutical companies have adopted microfluidics to assist the change in screening paradigm – why?
  • Jerome LeClercq

    Jerome LeClercq, European Marketing Manager, Caliper Life Sciences

    Seth Cohen

    Seth Cohen, Director, Application Sciences, Caliper Life Sciences

    17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:30 Networking Drinks Reception Sponsored by: Caliper Life Sciences

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Lorenz Mayr

    Lorenz Mayr, Executive Director, BioChemical Assay Development & Screening, Novartis

    9:10 SCREENING OF PROTEIN-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS VIA HIGH CONTENT BIOCHEMICAL ASSAY TECHNOLOGIES

    Lorenz Mayr

    Lorenz Mayr, Executive Director, BioChemical Assay Development & Screening, Novartis

  • Interfering with protein-protein interactions - current challenges/limitations
  • Generating new target-specific compound collections: The key requirements
  • Impact of novel assay technologies on modern drug discovery with difficult targets
  • Ultra-sensitive, multi-mode assay technologies for studying protein-protein interactions
  • Success stories on protein-protein interactions from the Novartis Lead Discovery Center (LDC)
  • Future directions of miniaturised multi-mode high content biochemical screening
  • 9:50 HOMOGENOUS ASSAYS FOR PROTEIN-PROTEIN INTERACTION

    Philip Newton

    Philip Newton, HTS Team Leader, Respiratory & Inflammation, Cambridge Antibody Technology

  • Homogeneous protein-protein assays in lead isolation and optimisation
  • Case studies for receptor-ligand and antibody-antigen interactions
  • Comparison of different assay technologies
  • Optimising assays to get the best hits
  • How protein-protein assays influence hit to lead attrition
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 KINASE INHIBITORS

  • Kinase focussed library - design and value
  • Screening and support of the drug discovery approach
  • ADME screening
  • The selectivity issue
  • Doris Hafenbradl

    Doris Hafenbradl, Director, Biochemical Screening, GPC Biotech

    Lars Neumann

    Lars Neumann, Group Leader, Assay Development & Biochemical Screening, GPC Biotech AG

    11:40 A MINIATURISED KINASE PLATFORM

    Christian Bergsdorf

    Christian Bergsdorf, Research Fellow, Schering

  • Challenges and benefits
  • Impacts on assay development, HTS processes, data quality and compound profiling
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 DATA ANALYSIS AND MINING TO FIND THE BEST LEADS

    Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason, Executive Director, Medicinal Informatics, Structure & Design, Pfizer

  • Analysing the data to get more from the assay results
  • Using the activity models to drive further library design and synthesis
  • Differentiating the compounds and attrition management using biological fingerprints to select candidates to proceed to preclinical and clinical testing
  • 14:30 EXTRACTING INFORMATION FROM HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING DATA

    Stephan Heyse

    Stephan Heyse, Project Head, Genedata

  • Scientific data as a product: what makes them "good"?
  • Converting complex data into useful information: data management and analysis strategies
  • Maximising quality: designs, parameters, controls
  • Maximising efficiency: automated processing and manual review of large-scale data sets
  • Maximising information content: global analysis of potency and high content HTS data
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NEW TECHNOLOGIES

    Andrew Chadwick

    Andrew Chadwick, Principal Consultant, Global Analytics & Life Sciences Consulting, PA Consulting Group

  • Possible goals of introducing new technologies in the HTS and early discovery environment
  • Quantitative and qualitative benefits
  • Identifying the risks and uncertainties
  • How can we justify their costs?
  • Some practical challenges to prepare for
  • 16:20 HTS IN GENETIC TOXICOLOGY

    Richard Walmsley

    Richard Walmsley, Founder & Chief Scientific Officer, Gentronix Ltd

  • The trouble with regulatory genetic toxicology
  • Genetic toxicology screening methods
  • Toxicogenomics and in silico screening
  • Selected CASE studies in genotoxicity screening
  • Next in HTS: micronucleus test and human cell biomarkers
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea

    +

    Workshops

    Cell-Based Screening
    Workshop

    Cell-Based Screening

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel
    25th January 2006
    London, United Kingdom

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel

    Harrington Gardens
    London SW7 4LH
    United Kingdom

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.