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Scientists are treating ageing more and more as a disease, as opposed to an inevitable pathway that we all will follow. The ‘cure’ for ageing is perhaps still thought of by most as a fanciful idea that, even if possible, certainly lies a long way in the future. However, with our increasing understanding of the ageing process and the discovery of new methods and products to detect, delay and treat age-related undesirables and diseases, achieving healthier and longer lives seems well within our grasp.

SMi has identified this as a key time to provide updates on developments in this industry. The conference will take a detailed look at new revelations in terms of the molecular, genetic and endocrinological basis to the ageing process. It will evaluate leading research trends for the discovery and development of anti-ageing therapies. This will include a focus on mitochondria, telomeres and stem cell technology as mechanisms of rejuvenation. The programme will also investigate recent developments in the treatment of age-associated diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

You will have plenty of opportunity to network and exchange ideas with experts in this industry, which has the potential to explode in the next few years.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Alan Hipkiss

Dr Alan Hipkiss, Senior Lecturer, Biochemistry, King’s College London

9:20 ANTI-AGEING THERAPEUTICS: AN INTRODUCTION

Dr Bryant Villeponteau

Dr Bryant Villeponteau, President & Chief Scientific Officer, HealthSpan Sciences

  • Should one develop therapies for ageing or age-related diseases?
  • Major proposed causes of ageing
  • Summary of recent data supporting each cause of ageing
  • Causes versus effects: does treating effects of ageing help?
  • Therapies that address each proposed cause of ageing
  • Best anti-ageing targets based on current data
  • 9:50 ENDOCRINOLOGY OF AGEING

    Dr Jan Nehlin

    Dr Jan Nehlin, Scientist & Research Associate Professor, Novo Nordisk

  • Many hormones decline in their frequency, strength and production as we age
  • What are the underlying mechanisms responsible?
  • Relative magnitudes and time courses of different endocrine adaptations in the ageing human and in experimental animals
  • The current focuses: HGH, DHEA, cortisol, melatonin, thyroid hormone and thymic hormones
  • Targeting hormone precursors for anti-ageing therapies
  • Implications of therapeutic reconstitution with hormones in the aged
  • 10:30 SLOWING DOWN AGEING FROM WITHIN

    Prof Suresh Rattan

    Prof Suresh Rattan, Professor, Danish Centre for Molecular Gerontology, University of Aarhus

  • Gerontogenes
  • Vitagenes
  • Failure of maintenance
  • Homeostasis and homeodynamics
  • Stress response
  • Healthy ageing
  • 11:10 Morning Coffee

    11:30 OXIDATIVE DAMAGE AND TARGETING ANTI-AGEING THERAPIES

    Dr Bernard Malfroy-Camine

    Dr Bernard Malfroy-Camine, President & Chief Executive Officer, Eukarion

  • Understanding oxidative stress and its role in pathogenesis and ageing
  • The anti-oxidant defence system
  • Pharmacological intervention to counteract oxidative stress: synthetic catalytic scavengers
  • Studies in animal models for diseases associated with ageing
  • Clinical development programs
  • Is oxidative stress one key to future research into ageing and age-related diseases?
  • 12:10 OXIDATIVE STRESS PROFILE

    Dr Richard Cutler

    Dr Richard Cutler, Senior Scientist, Exeter Life Sciences/ Kronos Longevity Research Institute

  • Longevity determinant genes and the dysdifferentiation hypothesis of ageing
  • Evidence for primary ageing and primary anti-ageing processes

    The genetic complexity governing human ageing rate

  • Oxidative stress represents a primary ageing process

    Processes governing oxidative stress status control stability of the differentiated cell

  • Stability of the transcription/translation profile of cells govern whole organism ageing rate

    Determining the oxidative stress/antioxidant profile of patients

  • Using the oxidative stress profile to create customised dietary supplements

    Demonstration that dietary supplements reduce patients’ oxidative stress status

  • The Kronos Laboratory tests and optimum health program
  • 12:50 Lunch

    14:00 MITOCHONDRIA AND LYSOSOMES IN PRIMARY MECHANISMS OF HUMAN AGEING

    John Furber

    John Furber, Founder, Legendary Pharmaceuticals

  • Turnover of proteins and mitochondria in post-mitotic cells: decline with age
  • Lipofuscin origins and consequences
  • Mitochondrial DNA mutations take over cells
  • Energy crisis and redox stress cause cell senescence and cell death
  • Damage to the brain, heart and skeletal muscle
  • Design of targeted therapies
  • 14:40 MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION IN AGEING AND DISEASE

    Dr James Dykens

    Dr James Dykens, Senior Scientist, Associate Director, Business & Corporate Development, Mitokor

  • Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in ageing
  • Oxidative mitochondrial pathology and failure
  • Mitochondrial contributions to disease (type 2 diabetes; Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases; glaucoma)
  • Polycyclic phenols (PPCs) as drug development candidates
  • Mechanisms of action and SAR
  • Mitochondrial consequences of PPC treatment

    New directions and indications

  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 DRUG TARGETING AND TELOMERASE

    Dr Calvin Harley

    Dr Calvin Harley, Chief Scientific Officer, Geron

  • Telomeres in the regulation of cellular senescence
  • The shortening of telomeres appears to be the cellular clock that controls the ageing of our cells
  • The telomere and telomerase connection
  • Four approaches for killing telomerase-positive cells as cancer therapy
  • Progress towards development of telomerase activators for degenerative conditions of ageing
  • 16:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Wilfried Bieger

    Dr Wilfried Bieger, Private Practice, ANT.OX

    9:10 THE AGEING BRAIN AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Dr Bruce Gitter

    Dr Bruce Gitter, Senior Research Scientist, Eli Lilly

  • Alzheimer’s disease: the most common cause of dementia among older people
  • Using in vitro cell and transgenic animal models to investigate the amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis
  • Understanding the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing enzymes in the production, deposition and clearance of brain Ab deposits
  • Alternative strategies to reduce brain Ab deposits and reverse cognitive deficits in transgenic animal models of APP over expression
  • 9:40 OXIGONTM: DUAL MECHANISM APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Prof Paul Bendheim

    Prof Paul Bendheim, Executive Vice President & Chief Medical Officer, Mindset BioPharmaceuticals

  • The central role of beta-amyloid cascade in AD
  • Oxidative stress in AD
  • Therapeutic strategies for AD
  • Complexities of trial design in AD: symptomatic versus disease modifying therapies
  • OXIGONTM: a potent neuroprotective molecule
  • 10:20 A PROMISING ANTI-AMYLOID APPROACH TO ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE THERAPY

    Dr Patrick Tremblay

    Dr Patrick Tremblay, Director, Pharmacology, Neurochem

  • Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) promote amyloid formation
  • GAG mimetics bind to amyloid protein and block amyloid formation in animal model of AD
  • GAG mimetics reduce brain inflammation associated with amyloid deposits
  • GAG mimetics: an oral drug candidate with a promising safety profile in clinical phase I trials
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 BRAIN AGEING AND GLUTAMATE

    Dr Gary Rogers

    Dr Gary Rogers, Senior Vice President, Pharmaceutical Research, Cortex Pharmaceuticals

  • Glutamate: the primary neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain for excitatory communication
  • AMPA receptor activity: its significance for cognitive function
  • How much potentiation is enough: how much is too much?
  • Ampakines: increased neutrophin (BDNF and NGF) expression to slow brain ageing
  • Ampalex: the effects of CX516 in the elderly with mild cognitive impairment
  • 12:00 AGEING SKIN

    Prof Alan Husband

    Prof Alan Husband, Research Director, Novogen

  • Signs of ageing primarily caused by photo damage
  • How does our skin change: the dangers of skin immunosuppression
  • Synthetic phenolic hormones with anti-inflammatory and immunostimulatory properties
  • Topical application: the potential for protection against UV-induced skin damage and as an anti-ageing formulation
  • So called ‘anti-ageing’ creams that temporarily moisturise the skin but do not reverse damage
  • Case study: NV-07a: the ability to undo skin damage following UV exposure
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 NEW TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS TO YOUNGER SKIN

    Dr Stanley Shapiro

    Dr Stanley Shapiro, Vice President, Science and Technology, Johnson & Johnson

  • The quest for young looking skin: the need for medical intervention
  • The ‘look good’ generation and tapping into the cosmeceutical market
  • Intrinsic and extrinsic factors responsible for skin ageing
  • Common active ingredients to defy signs of ageing
  • ReNova as a skin rejuvenation treatment
  • 14:40 CELL THERAPY FOR AGE-RELATED DISEASES

    Dr Don Kleinsek

    Dr Don Kleinsek, Chief Executive Officer, GeriGene Medical

  • Stem cells
  • Cell replacement
  • Host Vs.graft reaction
  • Safety
  • Funtionality
  • Regulatory hurdles
  • 15:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference, followed by Afternoon Tea

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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