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A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:

  • · Dr Claude Luttman, Head, Chemoinformatics, Aventis
  • · Dr Peter Hamley, Team Leader, AstraZeneca
  • · Dr Alan Wilson, Senior Director, Pharmacia
  • · Dr Werner Klaus, Senior Scientist, F.Hoffman-La Roche
  • · Dr Corinne Savill, Head, Drug Discovery Centre, Novartis
  • · Dr Dennis Church, Senior Scientist, Discovery Technologies, Serono
  • · Philip Tagari, Associate Director, Amgen

    5 KEY BENEFITS OF ATTENDING:

    1 Learn from leading experts in the area

    2 Gain insight into the use of virtual screening

    3 Meet the key figures from the major pharmaceutical companies

    4 Identify current issues surrounding the hit-to-lead process

    5 Raise your awareness of the technologies available for improving the hit-to-lead process

  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Alan Wilson

    Dr Alan Wilson, Senior Director, Pharmacia

    9:10 DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Trevor Howe

    Dr Trevor Howe, Scientific Expert, Computational Chemistry, Novartis

  • Assay format
  • Target type
  • Compound Collections
  • Use of non-linear methods in handling large volumes of sparse and highly variable data
  • 9:40 DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr David Williams

    Dr David Williams, Associate Director, Structural Sciences, Millennium Pharmaceuticals

  • Target identification and validation
  • Optimisation of chemical inhibitor matter
  • Exploring a number of protein targets
  • Disciplines in the process
  • Influence of structural biology
  • 10:20 DE NOVO DESIGN

    Bill Harris

    Bill Harris, Head, Chemistry, De Novo Pharmaceuticals

  • Lead generation options
  • Structure-based ligand design
  • Ligand-based design
  • Reduction to practice
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT

    Dr Peter Hamley

    Dr Peter Hamley, Team Leader, AstraZeneca

  • Keeping pace with HTS
  • The need for quality leads
  • Evolving strategies for library design
  • Linking theory and practice
  • Automating quality library production
  • High throughput chemistry in practice
  • 12:00 CELLULAR PHENOTYPING IN LEAD SELECTION

    Philip Tagari

    Philip Tagari, Associate Director, Amgen

  • Determination of desired cellular phenotype by antisense / RNAi
  • Transcriptome analysis and quantitation in the presence of screening hits
  • Multiparameter protein expression and cellular phenotyping
  • Applications in angiogenesis, inflammation and hematopoesis
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 PATHWAY MAPPING AND FUNCTIONAL PROTEOMICS

    Dr Michelle Palmer

    Dr Michelle Palmer, Director, Research & Development, Applied Biosystems

  • Understanding biological networks
  • Methods to reduce time from target discovery to drug development
  • Novel approaches to monitoring protein pathways in mammalian cells
  • Interaction analysis and protein knockdown
  • Applications: G-protein coupled receptor tyrosine kinases
  • 14:40 THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROTEASES AS TARGETS FOR DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Eddy Littler

    Dr Eddy Littler, Director, Biology & Molecular Sciences & Lead Discovery Manager, Medivir

  • Opportunities for protease inhibitors and track record of drug discovery
  • Bioinformatics of proteases
  • Validation of protease in disease models
  • The use of platform technologies (RAPiD) in the drug discovery process
  • The use of multidisciplinary approach to discovering leads against proteases
  • Overcoming the hurdles of turning lead inhibitors against proteases to drug candidates

    The presentation will describe examples in anti bacterial, anti viral and inflammation areas

  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NMR SCREENING

    Dr Werner Klaus

    Dr Werner Klaus, Senior Scientist, F.Hoffman-La Roche

  • A new focus of NMR in the pharmaceutical industry
  • Hit finding: screening of target-biased libraries
  • Hit validation: eliminating ‘false-positives’
  • Automation of NMR: handling of large number of data sets
  • Case study: pertinent NMR methods within Roche laboratory
  • 16:20 STRUCTURAL SCREENING

    Dr Miles Congreve

    Dr Miles Congreve, Associate Chemistry Director & Head, Lead Discovery Chemistry, Astex

  • The approach of screening and detecting very small molecules with low-affinity binding interactions by using X-ray crystallography and their use as start-points for lead generation
  • Advantages of this approach over conventional bioassay-based high throughput screening
  • The results from structural screening of libraries of 'molecular fragments'against several therapeutic targets
  • The development of potent lead compounds starting from 'fragment' hits by rapid structure-based optimizion using the three-dimensional structure of the ligands bound to the target proteins
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    9:10 ROLE OF PREDICTIVE ADME AND TOXICITY MODELLING IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Alan Wilson

    Dr Alan Wilson, Senior Director, Pharmacia

  • Current status of in silico models for ADME and toxicity prediction
  • Strategies for the development and implementation of in silico models
  • Integrating predictive modelling into high throughput screening strategies
  • Future opportunities and challenges of in silico modelling
  • 9:40 ADMET

    Dr David Leahy

    Dr David Leahy, Founder & Chief Scientific Officer, Cyprotex

  • Industrialising in vitro HTADMET testing
  • Knowledge Management for in silico ADMET
  • Integrating Data through the ADMET knowledge bases and the ‘in silico mammal’
  • 10:20 VIRTUAL SCREENING

    Dr Claude Luttmann

    Dr Claude Luttmann, Head, Chemoinformatics, Aventis

  • The use of bioinformatics & chemoinformatics
  • The need for computer-based screening
  • Turning raw data into valuable chemical information
  • Large scale virtual screening as a route to identifying novel drug leads
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 VIRTUAL DEVELOPMENT

    Professor William Bains

    Professor William Bains, Chief Scientific Officer, Amedis Pharmaceuticals

  • So what’s the problem with in vitro screening?
  • In silico approaches: bringing ADMET into library design and hit selection
  • What is ‘high throughput’ in the computational world?
  • Modelling and prediction techniques for complex biological processes
  • Using raw data and historical data into knowledge for compound selection
  • Going beyond the negative – artificial intelligence technologies for identifying new drug leads
  • 12:00 COMPUTATION TECHNIQUES TO SPEED UP THE DRUG DISCOVERY PROCESS

    Dr Pieter Stouten

    Dr Pieter Stouten, Senior Research Advisor & Head, Computational Sciences, Nerviano Medical Science

  • Biopharmaceutical property predictions: quality and application
  • Docking and scoring: what works and what does not?
  • Constrained combinatorial library design
  • Beating the odds with structure-based design
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 COMPUTATIONALLY-DRIVEN REITERATIVE SCREENING

    Dr Dennis Church

    Dr Dennis Church, Senior Scientist, Discovery Technologies, Serono

  • Substructure-based computational methods
  • Description of discrete substructural analysis (DSA)
  • Case Study: illustrating the use of DSA
  • Additional applications of the technology
  • 14:40 DEALING WITH THE EXPLOSION OF POTENTIAL TARGETS

    Dr Corinne Savill

    Dr Corinne Savill, Head, Drug Discovery Centre, Novartis

  • Target identification and validation
  • Advancing newly identified potential drug targets
  • From gene to screen to hit
  • Increasing efficacy and profitability during drug discovery
  • The future of target based drug discovery
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 INCREASING EFFICIENCY IN THE HIT-TO-LEAD PROCESS

    Dr Phil Jones

    Dr Phil Jones, Section Head, Organon

  • Properties of hits and leads
  • Why do hits not make leads?
  • Knowledge management in the hit to lead process
  • Managing compound supplies
  • 16:20 MAXIMISING KNOWLEDGE DERIVED FROM DISCOVERY DATA

    Dr Susan Bassett

    Dr Susan Bassett, President, Bioreason

  • Automating discovery data analysis
  • Using computational intelligence methods to derive knowledge
  • Distinguishing signal from noise
  • Making informed decisions based on data analysis
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Coupling in silico & wet laboratory methods for information driven library design
    Workshop

    Coupling in silico & wet laboratory methods for information driven library design

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    16th October 2002
    London, United Kingdom

    Coupling in silico & wet laboratory methods for information driven library design
    Workshop

    Coupling in silico & wet laboratory methods for information driven library design

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    16th October 2002
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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