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Benefits of Attending

· Learn from leading experts in the field

· Understand the opportunities, threats and challenges in pharmacogenomics

· Identify the key issues surrounding personalised medicine

· Keep up with the recent trends in pharmacogenomics/genetics

· Take advantage of the networking opportunities

· Meet the key decision makers

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:

Dr Richard Kramer, Executive Director, External Collaborations, Functional Genomics, Novartis

Dr Clet Niyikiza, Oncology Senior Research Scientist & Consultant, Eli Lilly

Dr Nicholas Dracopoli, Executive Director, Clinical Discovery Technologies, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Dr John Morrison, Head, Global Clinical Genomics, AstraZeneca

Dr Chris Chamberlain, Medical Genetics Expert, Genetics & Integrated Medicine, Roche

Dr Christian Lavedan, Director, Pharmacogenomics Lab, Novartis Dr Michael Phillips, Senior Scientist, Department of Pharmacogenetics, Orchid

Biosciences

Dr Miles Flamenbaum, Director, Business Development (UK), Oxford GlycoSciences

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Gordon Holt

Dr Gordon Holt, Principal Scientist, Oxford GlycoSciences

9:10 PHARMACOGENETICS AND PHARMACOGENOMICS

Dr Chris Chamberlain

Dr Chris Chamberlain, Medical Genetics Expert, Genetics & Integrated Medicine, Roche

  • Pharmacogenetics vs. pharmacogenomics
  • Re-evaluating the diagnostic paradigm in the peri-genomic era
  • Molecular underpinnings of pharmacogenetics
  • Integrating molecular genetics into clinical research: opportunities and challenges
  • Informing the therapeutic interface: future trends and ambitions for the industry
  • 9:40 PHARMACOGENOMICS: THE PROMISE OF PERSONALISED MEDICINE

    Dr Krishnan Nandabalan

    Dr Krishnan Nandabalan, Vice President, Alliances, Genaissance

  • Haplotypes and drug response
  • Improved safety and efficacy of personalised medicine
  • Pharmacogenomics clinical trials
  • HAP drugs and target populations
  • Marketing opportunities
  • 10:20 PERSONALISED MEDICINE

    Dr David Whitcombe

    Dr David Whitcombe, Chief Operating Officer, DxS Genotyping

  • Genotyping technology to support drug discovery, development and marketing
  • The transition from clinical trial to clinical diagnosis
  • Options for delivery of a pharmacogenomic diagnostic
  • Approaches to overcoming industry concerns about the impact of personalised medicine
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 HUMAN GENOME

    Dr Richard Kramer

    Dr Richard Kramer, Executive Director, External Collaborations, Functional Genomics, Novartis

  • Human genome sequence – increase in potential drug targets
  • Opportunity to move from symptomatic to disease modifying treatments
  • A multi-disciplinary approach to target selection
  • Balance of disease and technology focus
  • Genome-scale biology
  • Data integration – from components to systems
  • 12:00 HUMAN GENOME PROJECT & DRUG TARGET DISCOVERY

    Dr John Overington

    Dr John Overington, Vice President, Drug Discovery, Inpharmatica

  • Impact of the human genome project on target discovery
  • Target selection from genome scale data
  • Generic target mining approaches
  • Structural annotation of potential drug targets
  • Robust and scaleable strategies to lead discovery
  • What will the targets of the future be?
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 TARGET VALIDATION AND MOLECULAR PATHOLOGY

    Dr Jeffrey Ross

    Dr Jeffrey Ross, Vice President, Molecular Medicine & Head, Molecular Pathology, Millennium

  • Human tissue biorepositories and database management systems
  • Validating novel small molecule and antibody drug targets by RT-PCR, ISH and IHC
  • Validating pharmacodynamic and pharmacogenomic targets
  • New target validation technologies for pharmacogenomics: tissue microarrays, laser capture microdissection, and quantitative image analysis
  • 14:20 THE TECHNOLOGY CHALLENGES OF PHARMACOGENOMICS

    Dr Rhiannon Sanders Ph.D

    Dr Rhiannon Sanders Ph.D, Director Market Development, Pyrosequencing AB

    15:00 THE ROLE OF PHARMACOGENOMICS IN ONCOLOGY

    Dr Clet Niyikiza

    Dr Clet Niyikiza, Oncology Senior Research Scientist & Consultant, Eli Lilly

  • Why pharmacogenomics in oncology drug development? Why now?
  • From structural biology to systems biology: the promise and challenges of pharmacogenomics and proteomics in drug development
  • The role of mathematics, statistics, physics and computer sciences in post-genomic biomedical research era
  • The impact of genomics on biopharmaceutical industry: opportunities, challenges and the search for genomic competitive advantage
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 ROLE OF GENETICS IN DRUG-INDUCED LONG QT SYNDROME

    Christine Foster

    Christine Foster, Vice President Pharmacogenetics, DNA sciences Inc

  • Increased volume in genetic testing, increases requirement for more high quality DNA samples
  • Archived, precious sample sets and positive DNA controls are becoming depleted
  • Alternative and smaller samples are being considered for new studies, but have been limited due to small amounts of DNA
  • New WGA method, Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA) rapidly amplifies the genome with complete loci coverage and minimal bias between loci
  • MDA amplifies greater then 60 micrograms of DNA from as little as 10 cells
  • MDA is highly scalable and an excellent fit for high throughput analysis
  • 16:40 CANCER GENOME PROJECT

    Prof.Richard Wooster

    Prof.Richard Wooster, Head, Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

  • Finding somatically mutated genes in cancer
  • Describing the genomic landscape of cancer genomes
  • Using mutated genes/proteins as drug targets
  • How many mutated targets are there in cancers
  • What makes a good drug ‘target’ in cancer
  • 17:20 BUILDING VALUE IN PHARMACOGENOMICS

    Dr Richard Peet

    Dr Richard Peet, Partner, Chair Chemical/Pharmaceutical Group, Foley & Lardner

  • Patent strategies
  • Freedom to operate
  • Research tools
  • Licensing strategies
  • 18:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Michael Phillips

    Dr Michael Phillips, Senior Scientist, Department of Pharmacogenetics, Orchid Biosciences

    9:10 RNA SPLICING AS A SOURCE OF PHARMACOGENOMICS MARKERS

    Dr Laurent Bracco

    Dr Laurent Bracco, Executive Vice President, Research, ExonHit Therapeutics

  • RNA splicing dysregulations in human pathologies
  • Genome-wide scanning of RNA splicing alterations
  • Predicting treatment outcome in cancer patients
  • Commercial platforms
  • Toxicity-related pharmacogenomics
  • Selecting candidate genes for SNP analysis al adverse drug reactions events
  • 9:40 THE GENOME-WIDE APPROACH TO PHARMACOGENOMICS IN SEARCH FOR SURROGATES

    Dr Hakon Hakonarson

    Dr Hakon Hakonarson, Chief Scientific Officer, Decode

  • Genome-wide linkage approach to the pharmacogenomic trait
  • Mapping a pharmacogenomic trait
  • Optimising gene expression data by integration with linkage results
  • The role of pharmacogenetics in the gene target discovery process of complex disease
  • 10:20 PHARMACOGENOMIC APPLICATIONS IN DRUG DEVELOPMENT

    Dr Nicholas Dracopoli

    Dr Nicholas Dracopoli, Executive Director, Clinical Discovery Technologies, Bristol-Myers Squibb

  • Transcription profiling of cell lines, xenografts and tumors to predict efficacy of new oncology compounds
  • SNP genotyping for the prediction of adverse events
  • Role of pharmacogenomics in clinical drug development
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PHARMACOPROTEOMICS

    DrLan Bandara

    DrLan Bandara, Manager, Pharmacoeconomics, Oxford GlycoSciences

  • Developing diagnostic therapeutics for pharmacoproteomics
  • Tools to detect disease causing proteins
  • Drug intervention strategies using pharmacoproteomics
  • Latest tools, approaches and business strategies
  • The best way to play to current and future drug discovery
  • The future of pharmacoproteomics
  • 11:20 THE ROLE OF GENOMICS AND PROTEOMICS IN DRUG DEVELOPMENT

    Dr John Morrison

    Dr John Morrison, Head, Global Clinical Genomics, AstraZeneca

  • Patient stratification
  • Heterogeneity of response to therapy
  • Prognosis
  • Drug resistance
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 NEW METHOD FOR WHOLE GENOME AMPLIFICATION

    Dr. Roger Lasken

    Dr. Roger Lasken, Director of Genomics, Molecular Staging

    14:20 COMPREHENSIVE GENE EXPRESSION DATABASES FOR PHARMACOGENOMICS

    Dr Doug Dolginow

    Dr Doug Dolginow, Senior Vice President, Pharmacogenomics, Gene Logic

  • What content is important in a gene expression database
  • What kind of queries should a bioinformatic structure support
  • What are the technical issues that arise in constructing such a database
  • What kinds of useful information can be derived
  • 15:00 BUSINESS MODELS FOR PHARMACOGENOMICS COMPANIES

    Francois Thomas

    Francois Thomas, Senior Consultant, Atlas Venture

  • Market for molecular diagnostics
  • Services for and alliances with pharmas and drug development companies
  • Valuation of pharmacogenomics companies
  • Attractiveness of platform companies to investors
  • Impact on strategy and business models
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 REGULATORY, LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES

    Dr Kathryn Piffat

    Dr Kathryn Piffat, Associate Patent Attorney, Edwards & Angell

  • Strategic issues intellectual property
  • Patentable vs. non-patentable
  • Additional regulations
  • Opportunities for collaborations
  • Ethical issues in pharmacogenomics
  • Key current issues
  • 16:40 THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF SNPS

    Dr Ross Hawkins

    Dr Ross Hawkins, Consultant, Serologicals

  • Introduction to SNPs
  • Requirement for Sealed-tube genotyping methods
  • Amplifluor/generic labelling system
  • Maximising allele-specific PCR success
  • Volume and cost minimisation

    Dyes and plate readers

  • Reagent cost comparisons with other methods

    Single reaction nested PCR- a ubiquitous method for allele-specific PCR?

  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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