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SMi's ADMET conference is now in its 5th year - click below to view our 2010 event.

 

 

 

2009 Past Event Details:

Aims & Objectives of the Conference


How a drug interacts with the biology of a living organism can be extremely complex. Predicting the likely behaviour of a drug early in the development process is crucial if the resources put into developing a drug candidate are to be justified. Under the current research and development budgets, effectively and accurately predicting a drug’s behaviour has never been more vital.

This event will update you with the very latest modelling systems and technologies that offer valuable tools, providing an increasingly accurate picture of the ADME properties, drug-drug interactions and toxicity. The Conference will include an evaluation of current in vivo and in vitro strategies, identifying the problems posed and providing an opportunity for leading industry experts to learn and discuss what are the most viable methods, models and systems currently in use.

The event will assess the potential for more advanced high-throughput and in silico approaches that will enable selection of the most promising candidates from the vast numbers of potential leads identified. The integration and development of different systems for predicting both ADME and toxicity will be discussed, together with looking at how resulting data can be handled and analysed.

Benefits of Attending:

 

  • PREDICTIVE ADME/TOX MODELLING: Evaluate the strategies for the development and implementation of in silico models
  • MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING: Identify the strong potential for molecular imaging applied to ADME/PK and toxicology studies
  • IN VIVO PHARMACOKINETICS: Assess the new humanised mouse and rat models for increased prediction
  • TOXICOPHORES & BIOMARKERS: Consider new approaches using in vitro systems coupled with gene expression data
  • MICRODOSING: Learn about using novel technology for accelerating human PK starters

    A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:

     

  • Dr Alan Wilson, Senior Director & Senior Fellow, Pharmacia
  • Dr Kerstin Kramer, Head, Investigative Toxicology, Eli Lilly
  • Dr Ruth Roberts, Director, Toxicology, Aventis
  • Dr Mark Tischler, Senior Research Scientist, Wyeth
  • Dr Jacques Van Gompel, Principal Scientist, Group Leader ADME/Tox, Johnson & Johnson
  • Dr Matthew Segull,Associate Director, ADME Modelling & Informatics, Inpharmatica

    “This Conference gathers experts in the prediction of human metabolic fate, pharmacokinetics and toxicity of drug candidates, covering in silico, in vitro, as well as in vivo approaches. It is an important Conference for everyone in the field of drug development.”

    Dr Albert Li, President & Chief Executive Officer, Phase-1 Molecular Toxicology

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Alan Wilson

Dr Alan Wilson, Head & Senior Director, Drug Metabolism & Toxicology, Lexicon Genetics

9:10 PREDICTIVE ADME AND TOXICITY MODELLING IN DRUG DISCOVERY

Dr Alan Wilson

Dr Alan Wilson, Head & Senior Director, Drug Metabolism & Toxicology, Lexicon Genetics

  • Current status of predictive modelling of ADME and toxicity
  • Strategies for the development and implementation of in silico models
  • Integrating predictive modelling into drug discovery
  • Case study of successful modelling
  • Future opportunities and challenges
  • 9:40 EARLY DRUG SAFETY EVALUATION

    Dr Ruth Roberts

    Dr Ruth Roberts, Director, Toxicology, Aventis

  • The challenges in drug development: predictive toxicology and project rescue
  • Difficulties in screening for target organ toxicity vs mechanistic research on pathways
  • Biomarkers of toxicity
  • Input of genomics and proteomics
  • Metabonomics – can biomarkers of toxicity carry through to the clinic?
  • 10:20 PREDICTIVE ADME/TOX IN THE EARLY R & D ARENA

    Dr Afargan

    Dr Afargan, Consultant, MD BioScience

  • ADME/TOX as an emerging managerial-tool: improving decision makin processes in the drug discovery and development.
  • Conditions for sucessful, integrative ADME?TOX in drug discovery.
  • The role and importance of integrative know-how in the biopharmaceutical industry
  • Examples of models showing ADME/TOX as a molecular motif derived process
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ADVANCES IN CONSENSUS MODELING FOR ADME/TOX PREDICTION

    Dr. Holger Ruchatz

    Dr. Holger Ruchatz, Account Executive, Bio-Rad Laboratories, Informatics Division

  • managing analytical, structural and biological ADME/Tox data within an integrated cheminformatics platform
  • database creation: using biological activity property fields such as mutageniciy and other toxicity fields
  • batch calculations of chemical and ADME/Tox properties: linking compound data to analytical databases with NMR, MS, IR spectra and GC/LC chromatograms
  • applying consensus modelling to increase the accuracy of ADME/Tox prediction
  • increasing prediction capabilities for large data sets by selecting for substructure traits
  • 12:00 APPLICATION OF PREDICTIVE ADME/TOX IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Matthew Segall

    Dr Matthew Segall, Associate Director, ADME Modelling & Informatics, Inpharmatica

  • Achieving a balance of potency, ADME/Tox and other properties appropriate to the therapeutic goal of the project
  • Combining in silico, in vitro and in vivo sources of data
  • Quantifying uncertainty
  • Understanding simultaneous SAR for multiple properties
  • Case studies: virtual screening and parallel optimisation
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 PREDICTIVE ADME/TOX FOR DRUG DISCOVERY USING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE METHODS

    Dr Mohammad Afshar

    Dr Mohammad Afshar, Chief Executive Officer, Ariana Pharma

  • Interactive knowledge extraction using machine learning
  • Identify knowledge coverage of different chemistry regions
  • Explain reason for prediction
  • Example models include human intestinal absorption and mutagenicity
  • Combination of eADMET and virtual screening for quality hit identification
  • 14:20 INTEGRATION OF ADME/TOX PREDICTIONS WITH OTHER IN SILICO DRUG DISCOVERY METHODS

    Dr Jean-Pierre Wery

    Dr Jean-Pierre Wery, Vice President, Computational Drug Discovery, Concurrent Pharmaceuticals

  • Overview of computational tools for drug discovery
  • Overview of ADME/Tox in silico prediction methods
  • Integration of in silico drug discovery tools with ADME/Tox filters
  • Multidimensional optimisation methods for drug discovery
  • Integration of experimental and computational sciences
  • 15:00 ADME/TOX PREDICTION WITH IN VITRO HUMAN EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEMS

    Dr Julie Price

    Dr Julie Price, European Business Development Consultant, In Vitro Technologies

  • Reduction, refinement and replacement of animal testing using human in vitro systems
  • Human in vitro ADME/Tox assays
  • In vitro models of the liver
  • Each in vitro model can be used to answer questions
  • Methods for early compound high-throughput screening
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 IN VIVO PHARMACOKINETICS

    Dr David Leahy

    Dr David Leahy, Founder & Chief Scientific Officer, Cyprotex

  • Methods for prediction using simulation models of mammalian physiology
  • Performance in predicting fraction absorbed
  • Results for prediction of clearance
  • Results for prediction of AUC
  • Plasma-time profiles in rat and human
  • New model for renal clearance and volume of distribution
  • 16:40 IN VIVO ZEBRAFISH ASSAYS FOR TOXICITY PREDICTION

    Dr Chaoyong Ma

    Dr Chaoyong Ma, Business Development Manager, Phylonix Pharmaceuticals

  • Combining the advantages of higher-throughput analysis (compared to mammalian models) and higher relevance to humans (compared to in vitro and invertebrate models)
  • General and organ specific toxicity thoroughly assessed due to the transparency of zebrafish
  • Results on LD50 and organ toxicity from zebrafish-based assays correlated well with the toxicity data obtained from mammalian models
  • Reducing the cost and improving the efficiency of drug development
  • 17:20 GENETICALLY MODIFIED MOUSE AND RAT IN ADME/TOX PREDICTION

    Dr Alexandre Fraichard

    Dr Alexandre Fraichard, Chief Executive Officer & Chief Scientific Officer, GenOway

  • Comparative analysis of humanisation strategies
  • Knock-out and knock-in rat models
  • Use of reporter gene for monitoring gene expression through biomarker expression
  • Prediction of in vivo studies can be boosted by humanised mouse and rat models - Liver & intestine metabolism - Pharmacokinetics
  • 18:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Chaoyong Ma

    Dr Chaoyong Ma, Business Development Manager, Phylonix Pharmaceuticals

    9:10 BIOPRINT PHARMACO-INFORMATICS PLATFORM

    Dr Abder Mahfoudi

    Dr Abder Mahfoudi, Business Development Director, Cerep

  • Maximise efficiency in drug discovery/development cycle by front-loading information about compounds
  • Place new compounds in the context of known pharmaceuticals
  • Knowledge base consisting of known drugs and pharmacological reference compounds with in vitro and in vivo endpoints
  • Tool set for basic understanding of potential clinical behaviour of compounds
  • Prioritisation of ADME and safety studies
  • Decrease costs due to late-stage attrition
  • 9:40 PREDICTIVITY OF IN SILICO TOXICOLOGY AND IN VITRO GENOTOXICITY SCREENING

    Dr Jacques Van Gompel

    Dr Jacques Van Gompel, Principal Scientist, Group Leader ADME/Tox, Johnson & Johnson

  • Science vs regulatory
  • Flowcharts
  • Computational toxicology (Derek)
  • DNA damage (Vitotox)
  • Gene mutations (Amesii)
  • 10:20 TOXICITY AND NEIGHBOURHOOD BEHAVIOUR

    Prof Robert Glen

    Prof Robert Glen, Director, Unilever Centre for Molecular Informatics, University of Cambridge

  • Getting toxicity data
  • Toxicity and neighbourhood behaviour
  • New methods for molecular similarity
  • Metabolism and toxicity
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI)

    Dr Kerstin Kramer

    Dr Kerstin Kramer, Head, Investigative Toxicology, Eli Lilly

  • Macroscopic composition for assessing toxicology effects
  • Utilisation for measuring blood flow, perfusion and permeability of biological tissues
  • Strong potential of molecular imaging applied to ADME/PK and toxicology studies
  • Long-term toxicology assessments
  • Higher quality data with potentially fewer resources
  • Identifying the types of MRI exams that best impact specific studies
    Integration of MRI data with genomics and histopathology data – a systems biology approach
  • 12:00 APPLYING IN SILICO TECHNOLOGY

    Dr Seth Michelson

    Dr Seth Michelson, Vice President, In Silico Research & Development, Entelos

  • In silico biosimulation and top-down modelling
  • Modeling the ‘sick’ organ
  • Using in silico biosimulation to design predictive assays
  • Patient variability and predictive toxicology
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 PHARMACEUTICAL PROFILING IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Mark Tischler

    Dr Mark Tischler, Senior Research Scientist, Wyeth

  • High-throughput ADME screening program set up to evaluate and improve pre-development candidates
  • Use of high-throughput in vitro permeability and solubility assays to evaluate new compounds
  • Application of high-throughput LC-MS/MS for early stability evaluation
  • Analytical strategy used to perform metabolite identification
  • 14:40 MICRODOSING

    Dr Colin Garner

    Dr Colin Garner, Chief Executive Officer, Xceleron

  • Drug candidate selection with optimal human PK properties
  • Microdose vs pharmacological dose pK comparisons
  • AMS nanotechnology and its uses
  • Preclinical toxicology prior to microdosing studies
  • Regulatory perspective on microdosing
  • When to use microdosing and when not
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 DATA QUALITY IN ADME/TOX CALCULATIONS

    Prof Johann Gasteiger

    Prof Johann Gasteiger, Professor, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg

  • Data with the right characteristics
  • Evaluation of solubility models
  • Classification according to toxic modes of action
  • Metabolism reaction modelling
  • Companies need to give access to data to academics
  • Forming consortia for sharing data
  • 16:20 STRUCTURE BASED DRUG DESIGN AND P450 LIGANDS

    Dr Chris Murray

    Dr Chris Murray, Director, Computational Chemistry & Informatics, Astex Technology

  • Human P450 crystal structures have recently been solved
  • Comparison of structures with models
  • Current performance of docking programs for P450s and related enzymes
  • Virtual screening
  • Improvements to docking methods
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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