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Pharmacoeconomics is increasingly important in today’s competitive pharmaceutical market, particularly as recent regulatory changes require more pharmacoeconomic data. This conference will explore the recent advances in pharmacoeconomic analysis in the wake of rapid advances in technology such as proteomics, genomics and information technology. It will show how these impact on the drug discovery process and pharmacoeconomic analysis. The speakers will use case studies to demonstrate how to integrate these changes into your own health economic department.

As a senior industry executive, you will be aware of the importance of pharmacoeconomics. We would therefore like to invite you to register for SMi’s ‘Impact of New Technologies on Pharmacoeconomics’. As you will see from the brochure, key speakers include representatives from the NHS and leading pharmaceuticals companies.

The conference offers you the opportunity to network with key pharma industry experts. Attend to discover the rapid advances being made in reducing drug discovery times and to learn about the future of pharmacoeconomic analysis.

‘Impact of New Technologies on Pharmacoeconomics’ is organised and produced by SMi: we specialise in providing senior executives with timely, strategic and focused business information. SMi conferences are leading-edge business events offering delegates the opportunity to meet senior industry and government figures and seek their advice and opinions.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Prof Nick Bosanquet

Prof Nick Bosanquet, Professor of Health Policy, Imperial College

9:10 UPDATE ON PHARMACOECONOMICS

Dr Koen Torfs

Dr Koen Torfs, Director Global Health Economics, Janssen Pharmaceutica

  • The changing role of pharmacoeconomic analysis within the Pharma industry
  • Patient empowerment and outcomes research
  • New technologies increasing the pace of drug discovery
  • New technologies increasing the pace of drug discovery
  • The advantages of IT in reducing the costs of research
  • Future directions for pharmacoeconomics
  • 9:40 RELEVANCE OF PHARMACOECONOMICS TO THE PHARMA INDUSTRY

    Dr Jean Paul Gagnon

    Dr Jean Paul Gagnon, Director, Health Policy, Hoechst Marion Roussel

  • Regulatory changes affecting the use of pharmacoeconomic analysis
  • Uses of value analyses
  • Role of pharmacoeconomics in a pharmaceutical company
  • Issues in the use of pharmacoeconomic analysis
  • How accurate are pharmacoeconomic trials?
  • Relevance of outcomes research to industry
  • 10:20 THE UK QUALITY AGENDA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INDUSTRY

    Charles Dobson

    Charles Dobson, Pharmacy and Prescribing Branch, NHS Executive

  • NICE and the requirement for pharmacoeconomic analysis
  • Impact of generic competition on pricing issues
  • Quality of life drugs and government policy
  • Value of pharmacoeconomics studies under new regulations
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 LOGISTICS OF A PHARMACOECONOMIC STUDY

    Dr Anne Marciniak

    Dr Anne Marciniak, Outcomes Research Manager, Pfizer

  • Identifying the size of the therapeutic market
  • Potential bottlenecks to slow down the drug discovery process
  • How much would patients be willing to pay?
  • Requirements of regulatory bodies for specific therapeutics
  • Ensuring pharmacoeconomic requirements are factored into clinical trials
  • 12:00 PHARMACOECONOMICS AND THE REAL WORLD

    Dr Tony Lockett

    Dr Tony Lockett, Associate Director, Clinical Research, Covance Health Economy and Outcomes Services

  • Real world variables as opposed to clinical settings
  • Patient compliance
  • Trial population size
  • Quality of life vs Quality of health measurements
  • Following up on outcomes
  • Clinical analysis and submission of data to the public arena
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 PATIENT COMPLIANCE AND PHARMACOECONOMICS

    Dr Dyfrig Hughes

    Dr Dyfrig Hughes, Research Fellow, University of Liverpool

  • Improving outcomes data by establishing effectiveness
  • Effectiveness vs Efficacy: how well is effectiveness established in clinical trials?
  • Pharmacokinetic aspects of non-compliance
  • Impact of non compliance on effectiveness of drugs
  • Modelling non-compliance
  • Implications of non-compliance modelling for pharmacoeconomic analysis
  • 14:40 PRIORITISING HEALTH ECONOMIC WORKLOAD

    John Kerrigan

    John Kerrigan, Health Economics Manager, Hoffmann-La Roche

  • A review of priority setting tools used by industry Health Economists
  • The benefits of a systematic priority setting process
  • The interaction of an appropriate plan with other in-company functions.
  • The ‘ Priority Calculator’ - making priority setting a routine process and transparent for all
  • Case studies: priorities within companies
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 INCREASING IMPORTANCE OF QUALITY OF LIFE

    Catherine Morris

    Catherine Morris, Market Development, Team Consulting

  • Evidence-based consumer choice in the pharmaceutical market
  • Quality of life issues vs medical outcomes
  • Incorporating consumer perspectives in device design
  • Medical market segmentation
  • Changing influence of the value chain
  • 16:20 QUALITY OF LIFE STUDIES

    Dennis D Gagnon

    Dennis D Gagnon, Assistant Director, ICOM Health Economics, Johnson and Johnson

  • Basic Structure of a QOL study
  • Types of QOL instruments:Symptom checklist, Condition-specific, Generic, Utility
  • QOL as a secondary efficacy endpoint?
  • Advances in the technology of measuring utility
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and coffee

    9:10 IMPACT ON MARKETING FOR PHARMA COMPANIES

    Edward Gudaitis

    Edward Gudaitis, Director, Business Policy and Market Access, Hoffmann-La Roche

  • Altering marketing strategies to take into account pharmacoeconomic studies
  • Pharmacoeconomics as a pre-marketing tool
  • Payers as a marketing target
  • Selling to physicians using pharmacoeconomic information
  • Quality of life drugs
  • Information influencing patient choice - ‘Consumer pharmacoeconomics’
  • 9:10 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Richard Wyse

    Dr Richard Wyse, Chairman, Economic Healthcare Associates

    9:40 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ITS ROLE IN PHARMACOECONOMICS

    Dr Jeffrey Green

    Dr Jeffrey Green, President and Chief Executive Officer, DataTRAK

  • Difficulties in obtaining long term outcomes information
  • Keeping track of demographics
  • Sharing data on a global scale
  • Increasing the accessibility of data: Data mining
  • 10:20 IT AND COST REDUCTION

    Dr Peter Hoffman

    Dr Peter Hoffman, Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, PharMark

  • IT and managed healthcare costs
  • Software intelligence and predicting outcomes
  • Using IT to determine improved health outcomes with respect to cost
  • Efficacy vs side effect profile
  • High cost vs low cost
  • Rationalisation of clinical process costs in the pharma industry
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 INCREASING COSTS OF DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Hannah Kettler

    Dr Hannah Kettler, Industrial Economist, Office of Health Economics,

  • Pitfalls and advantages of predicting future estimates
  • Increased time between lead candidate identification and regulatory approval
  • Increasing regulation requirements increases costs
  • Shifts in focus from acute to chronic disorders and the corresponding increase in costs
  • Impact of new technology and the reorganisation of R and D on costs
  • 12:00 REDUCING THE COSTS OF DRUG DISCOVERY

    Brian Lovatt

    Brian Lovatt, Director, Vision Health

  • Timing of ClinicoEconomics studies: are these feasible before the clinical trial stage?
  • Anticipation of bottlenecks
  • Planning kill off times for drug candidates
  • Team playing between research and pharmacoeconomics departments
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 QUICKENING THE PACE OF DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Deval Lashkari

    Dr Deval Lashkari, Vice President, Marketing and Business Development, Genometrix

  • Identification of responders for clinical trial enrolment
  • Predicting adverse responses to drugs
  • Identification of prospective toxicity problems
  • Reduction in time from discovery to market place
  • Personalised drugs and preventative medicine
  • 14:40 BIOTECHNOLOGY SHAPING THE DEMAND FOR AND FOCUS OF PHARMACOECONOMIC DATA

    Dr M Haim Erder

    Dr M Haim Erder, Department Head, Health Economics, Amgen

  • Why do biotechnology products shape the demand, conduct, and dissemination of pharmacoeconomic data
  • Neupogen and its clinical outcomes
  • Neupogen changing demand for pharmacoeconomic data from cost minimization to cost benefit.
  • The impact of pharmacoeconomic data on Neupogen utilisation
  • Lessons and recommendations
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE

    Michael Kranda

    Michael Kranda, Chief Executive Officer, Oxford GlycoSciences

  • Prospects with proteomics, Individual medicine, the future of healthcare?
  • Prediction of side effect profile, Identification of therapeutic targets
  • Rational design of therapeutic molecules
  • Increasing the speed of identification of lead candidates
  • Early establishment of toxicity profile and impact
  • Pharmacoeconomics
  • 16:20 FUTURE OF PHARMACOECONOMIC ANALYSIS

    Dr Lisa Kennedy,

    Dr Lisa Kennedy,, Scientific Director for Europe, The Lewin Group

  • Potential for individually tailored drugs: ‘Boutique drugs’
  • ‘Boutique’ drugs and their cost effectiveness
  • Accelerating identification and optimisation of candidates
  • Reducing the length and size of clinical trials by identification of correct patient groups
  • Clinical markers for monitoring patient progress
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Making the Most from Pharmacoeconomic Analysis:  A Workshop for Non-Economists
    Workshop

    Making the Most from Pharmacoeconomic Analysis: A Workshop for Non-Economists

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    10th November 1999
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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