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It has been estimated that there are currently more than 40 million people worldwide infected with HIV, over 16000 new infections occurring daily, and 90% of new infections are occurring in developing countries in Africa and Asia. This alarming increase in the rate of HIV infection, combined with the large number of AIDS related diseases, the increasing resistance to existing treatments and the significant unmet needs in HIV, mean that this market is one of the fastest growing therapy segments in the pharmaceutical industry and is ripe for innovative therapies.

By attending SMi’s HIV Therapeutics: Searching for the Next Generation you will explore the developments and trends in anti-HIV therapies and gain an insight into future potential drugs and drug targets in the fight against this devastating disease.

Why should you attend this event? This is your chance to hear some of the world’s leading authorities on HIV, from pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, discussing new advances in HIV treatments, providing up to the minute data on current research programmes and presenting new insights and understanding into the disease itself and its treatment and prevention.

As a senior industry executive, you will be aware of the importance and potential of this field so I would therefore like to invite you to register now using the booking form on the back of this brochure or you can register on-line when you visit www.smi-online.co.uk/hiv.asp.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Johnson Lau

Dr Johnson Lau, Senior Vice President, Research & Development, ICN Pharmaceuticals

9:10 OVERVIEW OF AIDS AND HIV

Dr Hugh McDade

Dr Hugh McDade, Clinical Development Director, GlaxoWellcome Research & Development

  • Incidence and prevalence of HIV
  • Global epidemiology
  • Mortality of AIDS: comparison between continents
  • Financial impact of HIV infection
  • Important considerations in preventing the spread of HIV
  • Developing countries; Unmet needs and opportunities
  • 9:40 TREATING PAEDIATRIC HIV

    Sian Lloyd

    Sian Lloyd, Virology Product Manager, Bristol-Myers Squibb

  • Current anti-retrovirals approved for use in children
  • Addressing the critical need for paediatric HIV/AIDS treatment
  • Evaluating novel drug therapies in the paediatric population
  • Ethical considerations
  • Balancing need with legal and ethical matters
  • Future outlook of paediatric HIV/AIDS therapies
  • 10:20 PREVENTATIVE VACCINE FOR THE DEVELOPING WORLD

    Natasha Jenkins

    Natasha Jenkins, , DataMonitor

  • Statistics of HIV-1 clades (subtypes)
  • Chemical composition and mechanism of action
  • Eliminating the risk of infection through the use of a synthetic peptide
  • Ensuring worldwide utility of a vaccine though cross-clade protection
  • Hurdles in the development of HIV vaccines
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 CHEMOKINES IN HIV

    Dr Thomas Schall

    Dr Thomas Schall, President & Chief Executive Officer, ChemoCentryx

  • Targeting HIV envelope glycoprotein
  • Significance of gp41
  • High through-put screening of drug-like compounds for targeting gp41
  • Collaborating in the drug discovery programme
  • 12:00 CHEMOKINES AND THEIR RECEPTORS IN HIV

    Dr Amanda Proudfoot

    Dr Amanda Proudfoot, Protein Biochemistry Group Leader, Chemokine Project Leader, Serono Pharmaceutical Research Institute

  • Focusing in receptor biology; Chemokine receptors as cofactors for HIV entry into macrophages and T-cells
  • Characterising regions in chemokine receptors interacting with CD4 and gpl20
  • The role of chemokines in signalling or inhibiting viral infection and fusion
  • Modified chemokine antagonists - proof of concept; Mechanisms of inhibiting the chemokine-HIV interaction
  • Chemokine complexity and problems in designing drug target strategies; Inhibiting the interaction between the HIV envelope and chemokine receptor as a drug target
  • Current status of therapeutics acting via the chemokine system
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 CHEMOTHERAPY AND VACCINATION

    Dr Karl Deres

    Dr Karl Deres, Head of Laboratory, Institute of Virology, Bayer AG

  • Brief history of chemotherapy and HIV
  • Vaccination trials in HIV
  • Role of conserved CTL epitopes in long term non-progressors
  • Regeneration of the immune system after HAART
  • Window for therapeutic vaccination intervention
  • 14:20 MEASURING IMMUNE FUNCTION IN HIV PATIENTS

    Dr Judith Britz

    Dr Judith Britz, President & Chief Executive Officer, Cylex

  • The clinical value of measuring immune function
  • Identifying when to commence therapy
  • Establishing efficacy of therapies
  • Determining effectiveness of new vaccines
  • In vitro CMI technology: general principles
  • Future development directions for in vitro CMI
  • 15:00 ANTI-VIRALS ARE NOT THE PANACEA

    Dr Ligia Pinto

    Dr Ligia Pinto, Visiting Scientist, National Institute of Health

  • Problems with anti-virals: price and compliance
  • Long term non-progressors: how does the body usually deal with persisting viruses?
  • How do some HIV-positive individuals stay healthy?
  • Vaccines: problems with viral mutations
  • Building the body’s immune system to combat HIV infection
  • Importance of the cell-mediated immune response in combating HIV
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 STRUCTURE BASED APPROACHES TO TAT / TAR INHIBITORS

    Dr David Knowles

    Dr David Knowles, Director, Research & Development, RiboTargets

  • Ligand/receptor studies by NMR
  • RiboDock - modeling for the RNA environment
  • Ligand induced conformational changes in RNA - their relevance to drug design
  • Cell-free & cell-based assays for inhibitors of the Tat/TAR interaction
  • 16:30 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO HIV-1 GROUP 0 ENVELOPE

    Dr James Scheffel

    Dr James Scheffel, Associate Research Fellow, Hybridoma Research, Abbott Laboratories

  • Monoclonal antibodies were developed to a recombinant HIV-1 group O envelope protein derived from the HAM 112 isolate
  • Antibodies were epitope mapped with use of a series of overlapping peptides covering gp120 C-terminal and gp41 ectodomain regions
  • Several antibodies that were non-reactive to individual peptides did however react to a mixture of longer peptides corresponding to the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the gp41 ectodomain
  • These antibodies appear to be reactive to a helical bundle formed by the interaction of the two longer peptides
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Networking Drinks Reception for Speakers and Delegates

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Paul Von Hoegen

    Dr Paul Von Hoegen, Executive Vice President, Research & Development, Biovector Therapeutics

    9:10 NEW CLASS OF ANTI-VIRAL DRUGS IN PHASE II

    Dr Anders Vahlne

    Dr Anders Vahlne, Vice President & Head of Research, Tripep AB

  • Discovery of anti-HIV-1 tripeptide GPG by a series of mistakes
  • GPG blocking of HIV-1 capsid morphogenesis
  • Design of other anti-HIV tripeptides that block capsid assembly
  • Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GPG
  • Unexpected results in the kinetics of virus load reduction obtained in the phase I clinical trials
  • 9:40 DEVELOPING AND TRIALING ANTI-HIV DRUGS FOR NOVEL TARGETS

    Dr Friedrich-Wilhelm Kühne

    Dr Friedrich-Wilhelm Kühne, President & Chief Executive Officer, OXO Chemie

  • Understanding the specific role of the macrophages in HIV infection
  • Macrophage changes in HIV infection; Trialing WF10: a chlorite based drug
  • Using WF10 to induce or augment the expression of the alternative activation pathway in macrophages
  • Objectives of the trial
  • Evaluating the safety and efficacy of WF10
  • The rationale for WF10 in HIV disease
  • 10:20 TESTING NEW CLASSES OF DRUGS IN HIV

    Dr Christiane Möcklinghoff

    Dr Christiane Möcklinghoff, Medical Manager, HIV, Hoffmann-La Roche

  • Market for drugs in treatment experienced patients
  • Can subcutaneous drugs be marketed in HIV medicine?
  • Ethical considerations for trial design in very experienced patients
  • How to test for differences if the comparator arm is an ‘optimised background’ therapy
  • Expanded access - do we still need these programmes?
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ADOPTIVE IMMUNOTHERAPY OF HIV INFECTION USING GENETICALLY TARGETED T-CELLS

    Dr Kristen Hege

    Dr Kristen Hege, Director, Clinical Research, Cell Genesys

  • Background on T-cell adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and viral infections
  • Redirecting T-cells using HIV-specific chimeric immune receptors
  • Optimization of ex vivo T-cell growth and gene transfer techniques at clinical scale
  • Clinical trials of HIV-directed T-cell immunotherapy using CD4-zeta modified CD4 and CD8 T-cells.
  • 12:00 MVA F6 AS A THERAPEUTIC VACCINE

    Dr Paul Chaplin

    Dr Paul Chaplin, Director of Immunology, Bavarian Nordic GmbH

  • Are all MVA vectors the same?
  • Safety issues for a HIV vaccine vector
  • Possible therapeutic approaches for HIV
  • MVA F6 clinical up-date
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 IMPROVING VACCINE PERFORMANCE WITH ADJUVANTS

    Dr Frederick R Vogel

    Dr Frederick R Vogel, Formulation Platform Leader, Product Development, Aventis-Pasteur

  • History of adjuvants
  • Advantages of the use of immunologic adjuvants in vaccine formulations
  • Mechanisms of action of vaccine adjuvants
  • Immunologic evaluation of adjuvants
  • Preclinical safety testing of vaccines formulated with novel adjuvants
  • 14:20 DEVELOPING LIPOPEPTIDE BASED VACCINES TO HIV AND BEYOND

    Dr Paul Von Hoegen

    Dr Paul Von Hoegen, Executive Vice President, Research & Development, Biovector Therapeutics

  • Strategies for anti-HIV pharmaccines
  • Approaches to increase immunogenicity by lipioation
  • Targeting and efficient delivery to mucosal surfaces
  • From mouse to man: from model to reality
  • Clinical experiences
  • 15:00 IMMUNOPROPHYLAXIS, IMMUNOTHERAPY, AND A SYNTHETIC AIDS VACCINE

    Dr Chang Yi Wang

    Dr Chang Yi Wang, President & Chief Executive Officer, United Biomedical

  • MAb B4 neutralises HIV primary isolates (selected from subtypes A-G), HIV-2, SIV, and SHIV; MAb B4 treatment protects hu-PBL-SCID mice from infection by HIV-1 AD-6 and chimpanzees from infection by HIV-1 DH12 in both pre- and post-exposure modes
  • MAb B4 treatment alters the viral kinetics in plasma in chimpanzees infected with HIV-1 DH12 virus in an immunotherapy model
  • A continuous B cell site on the CDR2-like domain of CD4 was rendered immunogenic by linkage to UBI immunostimulatory Th sites and elicits neutralising antibodies against HIV-1 primary isolates
  • Antibodies to the B cell site block the MAb B4 recognition site by steric hindrance and have the same broad pattern of neutralisation as anti-receptor complex antibody MAb B4
  • UBITh peptide immunogens were broadly immunogenic: evoking neutralising antibodies in 3 species including a primate species
  • The site-specific CD4 immunogens were not overtly immunosuppressive in the primate and thus, can be used as cell-directed immunotherapeutic vaccine
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 WORKING AGAINST HIV RESISTANCE

    Dr Richard Bethell

    Dr Richard Bethell, Associate Director, Virology, Biochem Pharma

  • Problems of HIV resistance
  • Development of BCH-10618
  • Mechanisms of action
  • Activity of BCH-10618 against HIV strains resistant to nucleoside analogues
  • 16:30 HIV RESISTANCE AND PATIENT MANAGEMENT

    Dr Arthur Cole

    Dr Arthur Cole, Executive Vice President, Visible Genetics

  • The causes of HIV resistance
  • Clinical significance of HIV resistance
  • Methods employed at Visible Genetics to characterise HIV and determine drug resistance
  • Clinical evidence for the value of determining HIV characteristics
  • The role of drug resistance testing in patient management
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    HIV Drug Resistance: Genotyping & Therapeutic Guidance
    Workshop

    HIV Drug Resistance: Genotyping & Therapeutic Guidance

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    27th February 2001
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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