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Imaging technologies are a fundamental resource in neurological clinical trials. The use of this expertise in preclinical studies permits in vivo and in vitro research, not only advancing our knowledge of the brain but also reducing the cost and time spent on employing more traditional methods.

Hear key leaders present case studies and give advice on the latest regulatory challenges facing preclinical and clinical investigations. Learn how to image molecular targets, biomarkers and blood vessels to aid your understanding and forward the neurological drug discovery process. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to network with global experts!

Key issues that will be addressed at the conference include:

  • DRUG DISCOVERY: Hear about the latest developments in CNS drug discovery and molecular imaging
  • STUDY DESIGN: Discover the vital components of your study that can determine its success or failure
  • DIAGNOSTICS: Understand how imaging techniques can be used to diagnose neurological disorders
  • PRACTICAL USES: Recognise the practicalities and subtleties of imaging in the CNS. How can they be employed? What does the information tell you?
  • LATEST ADVANCES: Consider the latest preclinical and clinical developments in the imaging of the brain and CNS and how they can advance the field
  • NETWORKING: Network with some of the industry’s key experts, make valuable contacts while learning form their experience and expertise

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Michael  Rotte

Dr Michael Rotte, Director, Neuroimaging, Clinical Imaging, Novartis Pharma

Derek Hill

Derek Hill, CEO, IXICO Ltd

9:10 CONTEMPORARY IMAGING TECHNIQUES

Prof Steve Williams

Prof Steve Williams, Head, Centre for Neuroimaging Sciences, Kings College London

  • What new methods are currently available?
  • How do these compare to the more traditional methods
  • Considering translation from preclinical investigation
  • A look to the future
  • 9:50 STANDARDIZING MRI FOR USE IN LONGITUDINAL STUDIES OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IN MULTI-CENTRE CLINICAL TRIALS

  • Methods for quantifying atrophy from longitudinal structural MRI data

  • Standardizing image acquisition across vendors and platforms

  • The Quality Control challenge, with examples of what can go wrong

  • How imaging might provide evidence of disease modification in Alzheimer’s disease

  • Derek Hill

    Derek Hill, CEO, IXICO Ltd

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE USE OF IMAGING IN DRUG DESCOVERY RESEARCH

  • Imaging techniques in in vitro assay screens
  • Imaging techniques in ex vivo research
  • Case studies
  • o               CNS
    o               Bone cancer models
    o               rheumato- and osteo-arthritis research models

    Rony Nuydens

    Rony Nuydens, Scientist, Johnson & Johnson PRD REDEU

    11:40 PRECLINICAL MOLECULAR IMAGING

    Dr Martin Rausch

    Dr Martin Rausch, Head, in vivo Imaging, Basel, Novartis

  • Magnetic resonace imaging and spectroscopy allow non-invasive assessment of neurodegenerative processes in various disease models
  • New MR contrast agents allow to study inflammatory cells in brain and other organs
  • Nuclear imaging techniques and optical methods are key to study molecular processes with sufficient sensitivity
  • Validation of imaging methods in preclinical research is fundamental to enable the use of target-specific imaging in patients
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 IMAGING ON A SURROGATE ENDPOINT

    Remy Luthringer

    Remy Luthringer, Chief Executive Officer, Forenap

  • Which end points can you employ in neurological diseases?
  • Validation of the end point
  • Uses in cross-sectional, prospective and interventional studies
  • What information can these studies provide?
  • Clinical trials and the number of participants required
  • 14:30 DEVELOPMENT AND BIOMARKERS FOR MICROVASCULAR BRAIN DISEASE

    Prof Alan Jackson

    Prof Alan Jackson, Professor of Radiology, The Univeristy of Manchester

  • Microvascular disease in the brain – morbidity and the role in a number of neurodengenerative diseases
  • Characterisation of microvascular disease and microvascular angiopathy (MVA)
  • MVA and vascular dementia, late onset depression, cognitive decline in old age and Alzheimer’s disease
  • The search for reliable biomarkers of microvascular angiopathy
  • Direct imaging of the characteristics of MVA within the brain – increased specificity compared to traditional methods
  • Preliminary work and results – the potential value of studies of cerebral hydrodynamics as an indicator of early stage MVA
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 IMAGING BIOMARKERS IN NEUROLOGY

    Dr Paul Maguire

    Dr Paul Maguire, Associate Director, Global Clinical Technologies, Pfizer Global Research & Development

  • Overview of methods fMRI/receptor occupancy/structural MR 
  • Applications of receptor occupancy
  • Neuronal activation
  • Structural measures
  • Requirements for biomarkers at various stages of development
  • 16:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr James  Paskavitz

    Dr James Paskavitz, Medical Director, Perceptive Informatics

    9:10 EMPLOYING IMAGING AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL

    Dr James  Paskavitz

    Dr James Paskavitz, Medical Director, Perceptive Informatics

  • Advantages over traditional diagnostic techniques   
  • The advantages of imaging the brain when diagnosing neurological disorders
  • Accuracy and consistency
  • Limitations and disadvantages
  • Future steps
  • 9:50 USES OF IMAGING IN NEUROSCIENCE

    Dr Stephen Brannan

    Dr Stephen Brannan, Senior Medical Director, Cyberonics

  • Guiding principles
  • Analysing brain changes                 
  • Blood flow
  • Metabolism
  • Drug-receptors
  • Other
  • Linking imaging technologies with clinical and preclinical studies
  • Brain stimulation techniques
  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Other
  • Distinguishing the practical from the theoretical
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 COGNITIVE FUNCTION ASSESSMENT

    Prof Keith Wesnes

    Prof Keith Wesnes, Chief Executive, Cognitive Drug Research

  • The role of combined imaging and cognitive function assessment in drug development
  • Measuring cognitive function during fMRI
  • Drug induced cognitive changes and PET
  • White matter hyperintensities and cognitive function in ageing and stroke

  • 11:40 IMAGING APPROACHES IN CHRONIC PAIN

    Dr Boris Chizh

    Dr Boris Chizh, Director, Exploratory Pain Medicine, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Rationale for using imaging in chronic pain
  • What can - and what cannot - be addressed
  • How different techniques can complement each other
  • Place in analgesic development
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 NEURO-IMAGING IN THE LEARN-PHASE OF CLINICAL DRUG DEVELOPMENT

  • Techniques employed to visualise cells and cell types
  • To review the various methods for magnetic labelling cells for cellular MRI studies
  • To discuss the long and shot term effects of labelling cells with iron oxide nanoparticles
  • Experimental models – the benefits and disadvantages
  • Methods and technologies for clinical translation
  • Dr Joseph Frank

    Dr Joseph Frank, Chief, Experimental Neuroimaging Section, National Institutes of Health

    Dr James  Paskavitz

    Dr James Paskavitz, Medical Director, Perceptive Informatics

    14:30 THE ROLE OF IMAGING IN CNS EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE

    Dr Gerard Dawson

    Dr Gerard Dawson, Chief Scientific Officer, P1Vital

  • Using fMRI to bridge the pre-clinical/clinical gap
  • The role of imaging in elucidating drug action in the brain
  • Defining the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs
  • New tools for developing antipsychotic drugs
  • 15:10 AUTOMATED QUANTITATIVE MR IMAGE ANALYSIS IN CNS INDICATIONS

    Dr Chahin Pachai

    Dr Chahin Pachai, Chief Eexecutive Officer, Theralys

    ·                Requirements for image quality in longidudinal multicenter trials (MS, dementia, acute stroke, secondary prevention)

    ·                Examples of image processing modules

    o         Automated image registration 

    o         Lesion detection and quantification

    o         Brain atrophy quantification

    o         Hippocampal atrophy quantification

    o         Diffusion and Diffusion Tensor Imaging parameters

    o         Perfusion imaging parameters

    ·                Practical issues for successful implementation

    ·                Software validation and robustness

    15:50 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Close of Conference

    16:00 Afternoon Tea

    +

    Workshops

    Outsourcing your Imaging in Neurology Studies
    Workshop

    Outsourcing your Imaging in Neurology Studies

    Crowne Plaza Hotel - The City
    9th February 2007
    London, United Kingdom

    Crowne Plaza Hotel - The City

    19 New Bridge Street
    London EC4V 6DB
    United Kingdom

    Crowne Plaza Hotel - The City

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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