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SMi's Advances & Progress in Drug Design is now in it's 10th year.

Visit the 2011 event page

 


 
2010 Past Event Details:

Maximising the ability to identify a potential blockbuster drug has never been so important in the Pharmaceutical industry.  With many of the hugely successful drugs from the 90's coming to the end of their patents, the pressure is on to develop the next big hit.  This has meant the design of strong lead compounds is a must, and new strategies are being developed for this wherever possible.

SMi's 9th Annual Advances and Progress in Drug Design conference aims to address the latest developments in drug design and offer tangible examples of these processes in practise.  Attended by senior representatives from all the leading pharmaceutical companies this conference allows you to stay ahead of the game in drug design.

For sponsorship opportunities please email sponsorshipdept@smi-online.co.uk
 


 

  • HEAR the latest developments in computational drug design
  • DISCOVER structure based techniques for compound design
  • LEARN from your peers the methods that work, and those that don't

 


 
 

Paul Leeson
Director of Medicinal Chemistry
AstraZeneca

Jonathan Mason
Chief Scientist & Head, Computational Chemistry
Lundbeck Research & Heptares Therapeutics

Paul Bamborough
Section Head: Computational Chemistry
GlaxoSmithKline

  


  

Chris Murray
VP, Discovery Technology
Astex Therapeutics

Romano Kroemer
Head, Drug Design
Sanofi-Aventis

Robert Glen
Director of Chemistry, Unilever Centre for Molecular Informatics
Cambridge University

Chris Phillips
Senior Principle Scientist
Pfizer Global Research and Development

 

See the full lineup...

 


 

Delegates at SMi's 8th Annual Advances and Progress in Drug Design Conference, 2009 included:

  • Accelrys
  • Astex Therapeutics
  • F. Hoffmann-La Roche
  • Lundbeck
  • Merck
  • Novartis Pharma
  • Pfizer
  • Sanofi-Aventis
  • AstraZeneca
  • Aureus Pharma
  • Barts & London Sch Of Medicine
  • BAYER
  • BioFocus
  • Boston University
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • Bulgarian Organized Research Activities (BORA)
  • Cambridge Biomedica
  • Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre
  • Chemical Computing Group
  • Evotec
  • Faculty of Pharmacy
  • Galapagos
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Heptares Therapeutics
  • Inhibox
  • Institut de Recherches Servier
  • Institute of Cancer Research
  • Japan Tobacco
  • Kyowa Hakko Kirin UK
  • Life Chemicals
  • Muscagen
  • National Institute Of Advanced Industrial Science And Technology
  • Neutec Pharma
  • OSI Prosidion
  • Pharmaceutical Quality Matters
  • Pro Metic Life Sciences
  • Prosarix
  • Schrodinger
  • Simulations Plus
  • Takeda Pharmaceutical Company
  • Thomson Scientific
  • Treweren Consultants
  • Tripos Associates
  • University Of Campinas
  • University of Kuopio
  • Vernalis

 


 

 

Crowne Plaza St James London
 
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45-51 Buckingham Gate
London
 
SW1E 6AF
 
Tel: +44 (0) 207 834 6655
Fax: +44 (0) 207 834 6307
 

 

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Crowne Plaza St James London is a traditional deluxe hotel right in the heart of the city, perfectly situated for all your business and leisure needs.  In the heart of Westminster, it is just a stones throw away from Buckingham Palace, The Houses of Parliament, the London Eye and Victoria Station.

The hotel boasts three excellent restaurants. Bistro 51 with British and European cuisine, the Michelin Starred Indian restaurant Quilon serving south coastal Indian food and Bank Westminster with a modern British menu.  A beautiful, award-winning, courtyard garden surrounds the Victorian buildings of the Crowne Plaza London St James - a peaceful oasis in the centre of London.
 
Nearest train stations:
• Victoria Station, 7 minutes’ walk
• Waterloo Station, 10 minutes by car

Underground stations
• St James’s Park, 5 minutes’ walk (District and Circle lines)
• Victoria Station, 7 minutes' walk (Victoria, District and Circle lines)

From St. James's Park Underground Station to the Hotel
Take the main St James’s Park exit and turn left into Petty France Street.
Continue Straight down for 200 yards and at the end turn left into Buckingham Gate

SMi discounted rates include Continental Breakfast & VAT
£ 205.63 / Standard room / night for single occupancy
£ 229.13 Executive  room / night for single occupancy

Book your accommodation at SMi discounted rates by calling us on +44 (0)870 9090 713, sending a fax to +44 (0)870 9090 714 or emailing hotels@smi-online.co.uk.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Chris Phillips

Chris Phillips, Senior Principle Scientist, Pfizer Global Research and Development

9:10 CHALLENGES IN DRUG DESIGN

Paul Leeson

Paul Leeson, Director of Medicinal Chemistry, AstraZeneca

  • Impact of drug-like properties
  • Addressing pipeline attrition
  • Use of ligand efficiency metrics
  • 9:50 NNRTI DESIGN: STRUCTURE BASED APPROACHES

    Chris Phillips

    Chris Phillips, Senior Principle Scientist, Pfizer Global Research and Development

  • Structure Based Molecular Hybridization
  • Design strategies for drug-resistant viral strains
  • Structures in lead selection
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 HYBRID DOCKING

    Mark McGann

    Mark McGann, Principal Developer, Docking Software, Openeye Scientific Software

  • Use of the structure of a bound ligand to enhance molecular docking performance
  • Docking by smart overlay of ligand structure, scoring against the protein structure
  • Overlay process that only takes account of relevant chemical interactions
  • Case Study: DUD dataset results
  • 11:40 GPCR DRUG DESIGN BY LIGAND-BASED NMR

    Stefan Bartoschek

    Stefan Bartoschek, Senior Scientist, Sanofi-Aventis

  • Non-radioactive NMR binding assay for a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)
  • Method development on PKA
  • Qualitative and fast analysis of INPHARMA data: cross-chemotype alignments
  • Case study: GPR40
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:20 TRANSFORMING GPCR DRUG DISCOVERY

    Benjamin Tehan

    Benjamin Tehan, Senior Computational Chemist, Heptares Therapeutics

  • Dramatically stabilising receptors
  • The isolation of purified, stabilized and functional GPCRs
  • Case study: the StaR technology and its uses in drug discovery programmes
  • 14:00 GPCR MODELS AS TOOLS FOR STRUCTURE-BASED DESIGN

    Christofer Tautermann

    Christofer Tautermann, Department of Lead Discovery, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma

  • New trends in GPCR model construction
  • Model validation by single point mutagenesis and employment of various biological assays
  • Typical drawbacks and obstacles in GPCR modelling
  • Application of GPCR models in agonist and antagonist lead optimization
  • 14:40 BETTER LEADS WITH FRAGMENT-BASED DISCOVERY/DESIGN?

    Jonathan Mason

    Jonathan Mason, Chief Scientist & Head, Computational Chemistry, Lundbeck Research & Heptares

  • A target perspective: kinases, proteases, phosphodiesterases - and now GPCRs
  • An in silico perspective: what can be done, and how does it perform?
  • A property and polypharmacological perspective
  • 15:20 FRAGMENT OPTIMISATION

    Ian Collins

    Ian Collins, Reader in Medicinal Chemistry, The Institute of Cancer Research

  • Selecting fragments for progression
  • Scaffold hopping and scaffold novelty
  • Addressing selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties
  • Case history: elaborating fragments hits to in vivo kinase inhibitors
  • 16:00 Afternoon Tea

    16:30 OPTIMISING FRAGMENTS USING STRUCTURE-BASED DRUG DESIGN

    Chris Murray

    Chris Murray, Director, Computational Chemistry & Informatics, Astex Therapeutics

  • Application of fragment screening to hsp90
  • The production of clinical candidates from fragment screening
  • Stabilising the bound conformation - a secure way to affinity optimisation
  • Strategies for maintaining ligand efficiency
  • 17:10 FRAGMENT-BASED DISCOVERY OF A POTENT INHIBITOR OF THE ANTIAPOPTOTIC PROTEIN Bcl-xL

    Andrew Petros

    Andrew Petros, Associate Research Fellow, Abbott Laboratories

  • "SAR by NMR" approach to fragment-based screening
  • First and second site screen following by linking and HTOS
  • Optimization of "linked" molecule driven by structure
  • Case Study: discovery of ABT-737 for treatment of cancer
  • 17:50 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Roderick Hubbard

    Roderick Hubbard, Professor, Department Of Computing Services, University Of York

    9:10 EXPERIENCES IN STRUCTURE AND FRAGMENT-BASED DISCOVERY

    Roderick Hubbard

    Roderick Hubbard, Professor, Department Of Computing Services, University Of York

  • Working with fragments in biotech and academia
  • What works and doesn't work in structure-based design
  • The importance of integration across structure, modelling and chemistry
  • 9:50 DOCKING OF FRAGMENTS INTO RECEPTOR STRUCTURES

    Romano Kroemer

    Romano Kroemer, Head, Drug Design, Sanofi-Aventis

  • Evaluation of pose prediction and enrichment
  • Effect of re-scoring
  • Influence of receptor structures and characteristics
  • On improving structure-based virtual screening
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 GROWING FRAGMENTS AT UCB

    Richard Taylor

    Richard Taylor, Principal Scientist, CADD, UCB Pharma

  • Application to novel protein-protein interaction targets
  • Exploiting the synergies between high affinity antibodies and small molecules
  • Using biologicals to help evolve fragments
  • 11:30 'FUZZY' LIGAND- AND RECEPTOR-BASED VIRTUAL SCREENING TECHNIQUES FOR RAPID HIT AND LEAD FINDING

    Gisbert Schneider

    Gisbert Schneider, Professor for Chemoinformatics and Bioinformatics, University Of Frankfurt

  • 2D and 3D Pharmachophores
  • De-Orphanization of Protein Targets
  • Pseudoreceptors
  • Case study: histamine H4 Receptor, APOBEC, PPAR
  • 12:10 LEAD OPTIMISATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Richard D. Cramer

    Richard D. Cramer, Senior Vice President, Science & Chief Scientific Officer, Tripos

  • Virtual screening with Topomer Search
  • De-Novo Design
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    13:50 ROW - REACTION ORIENTED WORKFLOWS

    Guido Kirsten

    Guido Kirsten, Application Scientist, Chemical Computing Group

  • Structurally diverse libraries
  • Synthetically feasible lead structures
  • High optimization potential
  • 14:30 COMBINING SIMULATION AND DRUG DESIGN IN GPCRS

    Robert Glen

    Robert Glen, Professor of Molecular Sciences Informatics, Cambridge University

  • Large scale simulation of complex biomolecules is now possible over significant time intervals
  • Combining ligand-based and phenomenological models leads to better compound selection
  • Introducing clinical tissue samples at an early stage can clarify target selection
  • Case study: GPCRs APJ (Apelin) & 5HT1B
     
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:30 KINASE DRUG DISCOVERY FOR CHRONIC DISEASES & THE DISCOVERY OF LOSMAPIMOD

    Paul Bamborough

    Paul Bamborough, Section Head: Computational Chemistry, GlaxoSmithKline R&D

  • Kinase affinity profiling and selectivity
  • Case study: the contribution of rational design to the discovery of kinase inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory diseases

     

  • 16:10 CHALLENGES OF KINASE INHIBITORS IN LEAD OPTIMISATION

    David Buttar

    David Buttar, Computational Chemist, AstraZeneca

  • Exploitation of structural information
  • Review of computational approaches
  • Challenges for the future
  • 16:50 ChEMBL: OPEN SOURCE CHEMOGENOMICS DATA

    Anna Gaulton

    Anna Gaulton, Senior Data Integration and Development Officer, European Bioinformatics Institute

  • Overview of ChEMBL tools and databases
  • Applications of chemogenomic data in aiding drug design
  • Case study: successes using ChEMBL
  • 17:30 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

    +

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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