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Moving forward within the 21st century, more and more cosmetic companies are increasing development and marketing of products that provide therapeutic effects for users. Cosmeceuticals is a blend of Cosmetics and Pharmaceuticals which has appeared only in the nineties. There is a growing recognition that one of the key ways in which companies are going to obtain maximum return on their investment in cosmetics is to include strong capabilities in the field of cosmeceuticals.

Cosmetics and Healthcare will address the developments and advances in cosmetic and drug research, which have led to advances throughout science and industry. The conference will look at the technologies underlying cosmeceuticals, in addition to applying cosmetics to drug discovery and development strategies. The economic, regulatory and legal issues within the industry will also be discussed. The conference aims to bring together leaders in the fields of cosmeceuticals, medicine, and pharmaceutical development to offer an insight into the application of cosmetics in medicine and to analyse the future of the industry.

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
· Dr Freddy Van Goethen, Principal Scientist, Study Director Genetic & In Vitro Toxicology Johnson & Johnson
· Dr Stuart Freeman, Director, Toxicology, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare
· Frank Massino, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Senetek
· Dr Karl Lintner, Managing Director, Sederma
· Dr Bart De Wever, Business Development Director, SkinEthic Laboratories

Also including presentations from:
Pfizer, Procter & Gamble & Committee of Advertising Practice

Key benefits of attending
INGREDIENTS: gain an insight into the use of botanicals
DELIVERY TECHNOLOGIES: discover the latest developments
TESTING: learn about cutting edge in vitro technologies
CLINICAL TRIALS: keep up to date with the latest strategies
KEY DECISION-MAKERS: meet and exchange ideas with experts in the field

“Excellent very informative conference” Dr Richard Evans, Scientist, Unilever Research

“Assuring cosmetic safety without the use of animals is a critical issue for the industry, alternative methods have to be developed and implemented as a matter of priority” Dr Stuart Freeman, Director, Toxicology, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Thomas Dooley

Dr Thomas Dooley, Chief Executive Officer, IntegriDerm

9:10 DEVELOPMENT OF BOTANICAL HEALTH PRODUCTS

Dr H Friso Smit

Dr H Friso Smit, Senior Scientist, Numico Research

  • Developments in the botanical supplements market
  • Highlights of botanical supplements, some examples
  • Requirements for successful botanical health products
  • Quality and safety aspects
  • Efficacy and claims
  • Perspectives for botanical health products
  • 9:40 FUNCTIONAL SKIN CARE COSMETICS

    Dr Peter Lersch

    Dr Peter Lersch, Head, Research & Development, Personal Care Actives, Degussa

  • Filling the jar – what’s in a formulation?
  • Differences between non-active excipients and active ingredients
  • Understanding active ingredients are different in cosmetics and pharma – the cosmeceutical debate
  • Labelling and regulatory aspects – a global challenge
  • Claim substantiation is necessary – demonstration of proven effects
  • Factors affecting the formulation of functional cosmetics

    Current and future trends

  • 10:20 PAL-KTTKS, A PEPTIDE TO REPLACE RETINOL?

    Dr Karl Lintner

    Dr Karl Lintner, Managing Director, Sederma

  • Pal-KTTKS (Palmitoyl-Lys-Thr-Thr-Lys-Ser) stimulates collagen I, III, IV, GAG and fibronectin synthesis in human fibroblasts
  • Human skin biopsies from surgery
  • Gene expression connected to the wound healing responses of the skin
  • 5 clinical tests in vivo
  • Biopsies taken from human volunteers
  • Peptides stable in cosmetic formulas
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 BIOTECHNOLOGY FOR PERSONAL CARE

    Dr Raj Lad

    Dr Raj Lad, Senior Director, Consumer Markets, Genencor

  • Types of biomaterials
  • Repeat sequence proteins
  • Silk elastin protein
  • Its properties
  • Potential uses
  • 12:00 MANAGEMENT OF DANDRUFF WITH COSMETIC PRODUCTS

    Dr John Gray

    Dr John Gray, Medical Consultant, Hair Care External Relations, Procter & Gamble

  • Dandruff is now recognised to be caused by Malessezia restricta and globosa
  • Stratum corneum disruption is a key histological feature
  • Micro crystalline ZPT in a cosmetic shampoo formulation is the most cost effective therapy
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 EXPLORING THE OPPORTUNITIES IN A POTENTIALLY HUGE MARKET

    Frank Massino

    Frank Massino, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Senetek

  • Guidelines for advertising claims
  • Outlicensing versus direct selling
  • Kinetin: a case study - The science behind the molecule - The business model
  • 14:40 DISCOVERY OF MELANOCYTE TYROSINASE INHIBITORS FOR USE AS TOPICAL SKIN LIGHTENERS

    Dr Thomas Dooley

    Dr Thomas Dooley, Chief Executive Officer, IntegriDerm

  • In vitro bioassays for the discovery of mammalian tyrosinase inhibitors
  • Patent-pending highly-potent inhibitors of malanocyte pigmentation
  • Discovery of melanocytic cell biomarkers using DermArray DNA microarrays
  • 15:20 CLINICAL TRIALS

    Dr Betsy Hughes-Formella

    Dr Betsy Hughes-Formella, Managing Director, Bioskin

  • Clinical trial design
  • Clinical trial endpoints and claim substantiation
  • Current research findings
  • Problems associated with clinical trials
  • Advantages and disadvantages of different testing models
  • Future trends in clinical trials
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea
    Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Bart De Wever

    Dr Bart De Wever, Business Development Director, SkinEthic Laboratories

    9:10 IN VITRO RECONSTITUTED HUMAN EPIDERMIS (RHE)

    Dr Alain Coquette

    Dr Alain Coquette, Head, Department of Biology, SGS Biopharma

  • Topical formulations: advantages and problems
  • In vitro evaluation of anti-inflammatory molecules
  • RHE as model to discriminate irritants from sentisizers
  • In vitro percutaneous absorption and metabolism of hormones
  • Conclusion
  • 9:40 USING IN VITRO TISSUE MODELS TO ASSESS THE BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    Dr Bart De Wever

    Dr Bart De Wever, Business Development Director, SkinEthic Laboratories

  • Definition of tissue models
  • The in vitro test approach
  • Protocols for skin ‘mildness’ testing in vitro
  • Ocular hazard of cosmetics in vitro
  • The in vitro investment: cost-benefit analysis
  • 10:20 IN VITRO TEST METHODS FOR ASSESSING EYE IRRITATION POTENTIAL OF PHARMACEUTICALS

    Dr Freddy Van Goethen

    Dr Freddy Van Goethen, Principal Scientist & Study Director Genetic & In Vitro Toxicology, Johnson & Johnson

  • Background and rationale
  • The collaborative project
  • The process of prevalidation
  • Protocol standardisation
  • Obtained results
  • Future steps
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE USE OF AN IN VITRO RECONSTRUCTED HUMAN EPIDERMIS FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF IRRITATING AND PHOTOTOXIC COMPOUNDS

    Dr Nathalie Alepee

    Dr Nathalie Alepee, Laboratory Manager, Pfizer

  • In vitro strategy in toxicity risk assessment
  • Observation of irritancy in clinical and animal studies
  • Correlation of in vivo studies and in vitro human epidermis model
  • Assessment of the phototoxic potential of compounds using 3T3-NRU and 3-D human in vitro assays
  • Comparison of in vivo and in vitro data
  • Conclusion
  • 12:00 ESTABLISHING THE SAFETY OF COSMETICS

    Dr Stuart Freeman

    Dr Stuart Freeman, Director, Toxicology, GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare

  • Assessing safety of ingredients
  • Assessing safety of products
  • Is animal testing ever justified?
  • How useful are the non-animal alternatives?
  • Assessing safety of marketed products
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 COSMETIC OR DRUG? CLAIMS AND PRESENTATION TO ENSURE EARLY MARKETING OF YOUR PRODUCT IN EUROPE

    Dr Peter Lassoff

    Dr Peter Lassoff, Director, Worldwide Regulatory Affairs, Parexel International

  • Examples of products that can be sold as medical products or as cosmetics
  • Safety and efficacy requirements of drugs vs cosmetics
  • Cosmetic labelling: declaration of ingredients
  • How to chose between drug sales vs cosmetic sales
  • Early marketing of your cosmetic to gain funds for drug development
  • 14:40 BRANDS-LEARNING FROM PARRALLEL MARKETS

    Peter Shaw

    Peter Shaw, Director, Corporate Edge

  • 360° perspective
  • Drawing on future market and consumer trends
  • Creating proposition that work across cultural boundaries
  • Evoking the brand personality
  • 15:20 ADVERTISING COSMETICS AND HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS

    Sarah Coe

    Sarah Coe, Copy Advice Executive, Committee of Advertising Practice

  • Why self-regulation and not law
  • The British codes of advertising and sales promotion
  • Points to watch when advertising cosmetics and healthcare products
  • Getting advice before you publish
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea
    Close Of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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