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SMi’s 2nd Annual Imaging in Oncology conference will provide cutting edge insights and practical information on the latest developments affecting this rapidly evolving field. Bringing together leading radiologists and researchers, involved in both cancer drug discovery and development, this event will critically asses the clinical application of imaging 2006 and beyond; paying particular attention to image formation, analysis and interpretation.

This event aims to deliver practical guidelines for submitting imaging data to regulatory authorities, with a particular focus on successful FDA imaging submissions, compliance and supporting documentation applications. You will acquire best practice advice from leading companies as they discuss the application of current and innovative imaging technologies and development in oncology. Key issues to be addressed include; the role of imaging in cancer drug discovery – what is the reality? The value of translational studies, designing image evaluation in phase II/III, the use and application of imaging in late-stage oncology clinical trials and RECIST vs WHO response criteria – the big debate?

Learn how to deliver imaging solutions that accelerate and/or improve the progression of the regulatory approval of your company’s oncology portfolio by participating in this must attend event.

An unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts, including:

  • Dr José Zubeldia, Medical Assessor, Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)
  • Dr Joseph Frank, Chief, Experimental Neuroimaging Section, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Dr Patricia Cole, Senior Director & Head, Imaging Programmes, Eisai Medical Research
  • Dr Philip Murphy, Associate Director, Clinical Technology, Pfizer
  • Dr Sudeep Chandra, Director, Imaging Sciences, Millennium Pharmaceuticals
  • Professor Ken Miles, Professor, Imaging, Brighton & Sussex Medical School
  • Dr Anwar Padhani, Consultant Radiologist & Lead, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital
  • Dr Helen Young, Research Clinical Scientist, Discovery Medicine Imaging RCS (PET), AstraZeneca

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Sudeep Chandra

Sudeep Chandra, Director, Imaging Sciences, Millennium Pharmaceuticals

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Andrzej  Dzik-Jurasz

Andrzej Dzik-Jurasz, Vice President, Clinical Development, Point Therapeutics Inc

  • An overview of functional imaging in oncology with an emphasis on imaging in man
  • What drives the direction of current imaging research
  • Thr role of targeted imaging agents in man
  • The clinical application of imaging 2006 and beyond
  • 9:50 THE VALUE OF FUNCTIONAL IMAGING TO THE DRUG DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

    Helen Young

    Helen Young, Discovery Medicine Imaging RCS (PET), AstraZeneca

  • Devising an integrated programme of clinical and preclinical work
  • Making the right choice – establishing a go/no-go decision in phase I/II oncology development
  • Translational science – delivering decisive imaging biomarkers
  • MRI, PET or other imaging technologies?
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 APPLICATIONS OF ANATOMICAL IMAGING FOR DRUG DISCOVERY

    Matthew Silva

    Matthew Silva, Scientist II, Millennium Pharmaceuticals

  • MRI and microCT optimisation of animal models
  • Development of robust analysis algorithms
  • Compound efficacy evaluation
  • 11:40 MOLECULAR IMAGING FOR CANCER DRUG DISCOVERY

    Christoph Hergersberg

    Christoph Hergersberg, Global Technology Leader, Biosciences, GE Global Research

  • Assessing the role of functional and molecular imaging in cancer drug discovery
  • Imaging of small animals vs ‘whole body’ imaging
  • Understanding the relationship between PK/PD through the use of imaging
  • Further positive use of non-invasive molecular imaging in cancer drug development
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 USES OF IMAGING IN CANCER RESEARCH

  • Use of global biomarkers, e.g., FDG, FLT, etc., in preclinical microPET studies
  • MicroCT is more than a very expensive caliper
  • Developing site-specific agents in support of targeted therapies
  • Use of animal models in imaging studies
  • Raymond Gibson

    Raymond Gibson, Senior Investigator, Merck Research Laboratories

    14:30 MEDICAL IMAGING PLATFORMS FOR CLINICAL TRIALS

    Ted Gastineau

    Ted Gastineau, Chief Executive Officer, Beacon Bioscience, Inc.

  • Understand the long-term value of your images
  • Develop internal expertise and tools
  • Manage your vendor to create open source data sets
  • Understand what FDA is looking for in charters and image based submissions
  • Development of an image-based knowledge tool for oncology
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 IMAGING BIOMARKERS IN ONCOLOGIC DRUG DEVELOPMENT

  • What information can imaging provide about drug distribution, hitting the target, affecting the pathway, biological drug effect, drug dose and schedule?
  • What can we image?
  • Examples of imaging biomarkers in oncologic trials
  • Critical features for the implementation of imaging in clinical trials
  • Patricia  Cole

    Patricia Cole, Senior Director & Head, Imaging Programmes, Eisai Medical Research Inc

    16:20 MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI)

    Philip Murphy

    Philip Murphy, Associate Director, Pfizer

  • Delivering morphological and physiological biomarkers
  • From radiology to quantitative biomarkers
  • Physiological biomarkers applied to phase I/II trials
  • Developing novel imaging approaches for improved decision making
  • Future direction of magnetic resonance imaging
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    Sudeep Chandra

    Sudeep Chandra, Director, Imaging Sciences, Millennium Pharmaceuticals

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Donald Rosen

    Donald Rosen, Managing Director, Radpharm

    9:10 DESIGN OF IMAGE EVALUATION IN PHASE II/III STUDIES

    Donald Rosen

    Donald Rosen, Managing Director, Radpharm

  • CRFs for image evaluations
  • Separate or combined image evaluations
  • Blinded imaging evaluations
  • Independent image evaluations
  • Offsite and onsite image evaluations
  • The effect of imaging evaluations on clinical outcomes
  • Examples of image evaluation at phase II and III
  • 9:50 LATE-STAGE ONCOLOGY CLINICAL TRIALS

  • What are the key objectives of phase II-IV clinical trials for developing oncology drugs?
  • How does clinical imaging contribute to these goals today?
  • How will clinical imaging likely contribute to these goals in the future?
  • Challenges and limitations
  • Paul Maguire

    Paul Maguire, , Pfizer Global Research & Development

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 OVERCOMING REGULATORY ISSUES

    Jose Zubeldia

    Jose Zubeldia, Medical Assessor, Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)

  • How does the regulatory review work when using biomarkers?
  • What are the key elements the regulators will look for?
  • Overview of the past experience with biomarkers in the MHRA
  • Presenting the evidence to the regulators
  • 11:40 TARGETING TUMOUR BLOOD VESSELS

    Anwar Padhani

    Anwar Padhani, Consultant Radiologist & Lead, MRI Imaging, Mount Vernon Hospital

  • The use of serial dynamic resonance imaging (MRI) to ascertain the effects of anti-angiogenics and anti-endothelial on tumour blood flow
  • MRI kinetic parameters and what they mean
  • Considerations for multi-centre studies
  • Results of MRI: do blood flow measurements predict efficacy?
  • Impact of this technique during the clinical trials process
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 CELLULAR MRI TRACKING THE FATE OF MAGNETICALLY LABELLED CELLS IN EXPERIMENTAL TUMOUR MODELS

    Joseph Frank

    Joseph Frank, Chief, Experimental Neuroimaging Section, National Institutes Of Health N I D D K

  • To review the various methods for magnetic labelling cells for cellular MRI studies
  • To discuss the long and short term effects of labelling cells with iron oxide nanoparticles
  • To provide examples of magnetically labelled hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells incorporating into neovasculature of growing tumours
  • To demonstrate the migration of magnetically labelled immune cells into tumours
  • To present how imaging can be used to monitor cellular based therapies
  • 14:30 DYNAMIC PERFUSION CT IMAGING

    Ken Miles

    Ken Miles, Prof, Imaging, Brighton & Sussex Medical School

  • Limitations of structural response markers such as RECIST treatment
  • Using perfusion CT to obtain accurate, reproducible data on tumour vascular physiology
  • Volumetric CT - when is the extra effort worth it and when is regular CT with RECIST criteria good enough?
  • Perfusion CT as a marker of tumour angiogenesis
  • Monitoring therapeutic response with perfusion CT
  • Combining perfusion CT with PET
  • Best practice guidelines for when to use CT vs MRI – can the two be mixed in one drug development protocol depending on the various tumour types?
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 MULTI-MODALITY SYNERGY FROM DRUG DISCOVERY TO CLINIC

  • End-to-end imaging
  • New approaches for drug-screening, preclinical and clinical imaging
  • FDG and beyond
  • The advantage of clinical PET/CT
  • PET/CT as a clinical standard?
  • Christoph Hergersberg

    Christoph Hergersberg, Global Technology Leader, Biosciences, GE Global Research

    16:20 PARTNERING WITH AN IMAGING SERVICE PROVIDER

    Terri Binder

    Terri Binder, Medical Imaging Manager, Global Development Operations Technical Services, Amgen Inc

  • Defining sponsor requirements
  • Choosing a service provider
  • Communicating with the service provider
  • Implementing a programmatic rather than a study-by-study approach
  • Monitoring on an ongoing basis vs only auditing the service provider
  • Lessons learned
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    Donald Rosen

    Donald Rosen, Managing Director, Radpharm

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    Millennium Gloucester Hotel

    Harrington Gardens
    London SW7 4LH
    United Kingdom

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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