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After the success of 2009's conference, SMi is proud to present their 6th Annual Imaging in Oncology.

Taking place in London, UK, this conference will focus on a wide range of imaging techniques in a wide range of settings - from the preclinical, to the clinical, to the future of oncological imaging.  You will hear presentations from the leading experts in their fields on the latest developments in MRI, PET, SPECT, IR, Raman Sepctroscopy and more.

The changes RECIST 1.1 has made - an assessment one year on.  How is MRI being used to guide biopsies?  Can less harmful techniques than PET be as effective in imaging a tumour?  Are nanoparticles the future for advanced cancer imaging?  Looking beyond tumour size - what techniques can help us understand the internal workings of a tumour?  How can we reduce the harmful effects of imaging?  How effective is proteomic profiling using mass spectrometry in diagnostics?

Attend this event to discover the power of imaging for developing new drugs, following the reaction to therapies and developing a personalised approach to the treatment of cancer.

Fancy speaking at the conference?  Do you know of anyone who may be interested in speaking?  We are always on the look-out for new speakers for our upcoming conferences.  Let us know: smiproduction@smi-online.co.uk.

For sponsorship and exhibitioning opportunites, contact  sponsorshipdept@smi-online.co.uk.

 

Delegates at this conference will learn about:

Guidelines for imaging in clinical trials - one year on from RECIST 1.1 - where to go now?

New techniques being developed for MRI, PET, SPECT, SORS, Flow Cytometry and Mass Spectrometry

Clinical imaging with a focus on breast cancer

Preclinical imaging with a view to developing personalised cancer therapies

Future developments and improving the safety of imaging technologies

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How you will benefit from attending this conference:

Hear from the leading lights of the imaging world about their latest research into imaging technique

See imaging techniques you know being used for procedures you do not know

Learn where the future lies for imaging in oncology

Network with the people you need to know in the imaging arena


Feedback from SMi's Imaging in Oncology 2009:

"Good mix of clinical and preclinical presentations" - Senior Representative, Cancer Research UK

"Very good on imaging in drug development" - Senior Representative, Imperial College London

Chief Executives, Vice Presidents, Directors, Heads, Managers, Chief Scientists and Group Leaders of

  • Oncology
  • Oncological Imaging
  • Medical Imaging
  • Regulatory Affairs
  • Research and Development
  • Clinical Technology
  • Cancer Drug Development
  • Clinical Studies
  • Discovery Medicine
  • Specialised Therapeutics
  • Oncology Consultancy
  • Legislation & Policy Advice
  • Safety Assessment
  • Informatics
  • Experimental Medicine

 Attendees at our previous Imaging in Oncology Conferences came from

Graph of delegate's nationalities by World Region


Previous delegates worked for

Amgen    AstraZeneca    Bayer    Bioscan Europe    Boehringer Ingelheim    Bristol-Myers Squibb    Cancer Research UK    Eisai    Eli Lilly    F.Hoffmann-La Roche    GE Healthcare    GlaxoSmithKline    Merck    Millennium Pharmaceuticals    Novartis    Pfizer    Sanofi-Aventis    Schering Plough    Wyeth

 

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & coffee

9:00 Chairman's opening remarks

Daniel Bradley

Daniel Bradley, Scientist II, Millennium Pharmaceuticals

9:05 OPENING KEYNOTE: EXPLORING THE AMENDED GUIDELINES OF RECIST 1.1 - LEARNING HOW TO ADAPT THEM ACCURATELY

Robert Morgan

Robert Morgan, Senior Vice President, Quality and Clinical Development, Ziopharm

  • Understanding use and benefits of RECIST 1.1 in clinical trials with a primary endpoint of objective response
  • Evaluating the tumour response: assessing tumour shrinkage and disease progression based on the sum of diameters without anatomical-based imaging
  • What are the relevant changes?
  • Exploring remaining issues to be defined - how to adapt RECIST 1.1 in the future
  • 9:40 ADVANCES IN MOLECULAR IMAGING FOR ONCOLOGY CLINICAL TRIALS

    Karoline Meurer

    Karoline Meurer, Managing Director, RadPharm

  • Molecular imaging and its value in drug development
  • Overview of toolbox of molecular imaging modalities
  • FDG-PET as a molecular imaging model
  • Strategies to use FDG-PET in oncology trials
  • Pitfalls to avoid in quantitative imaging
  • 10:15 OPTICAL IMAGING IN ANTI-CANCER DRUG DEVELOPMENT - AN INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVE

    Werner Scheuer

    Werner Scheuer, Group Leader, Preclinical Optical Imaging, Pharmacology TR-PD, Pharmaceutical Research, Roche Diagnostics

  • Utility of optical imaging for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics
  • Successes and limitations of optical imaging in preclinical cancer models
  • Tomographic measurements versus planar reflectance
  • Combination of optical imaging with other imaging modalities
  • Future aspects: new probes and new systems
  • 10:50 Morning coffee

    11:20 CONTRAST ENHANCED ULTRASOUND: A NEW APPROACH TO TUMOUR RESPONSE TO TREATMENT

    Daniela Bokor

    Daniela Bokor, Medical Director Ultrasound, Group Research and Development, Bracco Imaging

  • Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a new technology to study microcirculation 
  • CEUS is a quantitative and reproducible methodology to assess tumour perfusion 
  • CEUS clinical validation: early tumour perfusion assessment is predictive of tumour response to treatment
  • 11:55 PRECLINICAL STUDIES IN THE ADAPTIVE DESIGN OF TRANSLATIONAL ONCOLOGY USING PET TRACERS

    Jean-Frederic Salazar

    Jean-Frederic Salazar, Principal Scientist, Lead Pre-Clinical Oncology, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Rational in-vitro studies, 2D and 3D
  • Adaptive design during preclinical in-vivo studies
  • Help in the decision process when designing clinical trials
  • 12:30 SPECIAL ADDRESS: TRANSLATIONAL IMAGING: CONSIDERATIONS IN ONCOLOGY DRUG DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT

    Daniel Bradley

    Daniel Bradley, Scientist II, Millennium Pharmaceuticals

  • Translational imaging modalities in oncology
  • Considerations for translating imaging
  • Examples of MRI and PET preclinical oncology research
  • 13:05 Networking lunch

    14:05 MALDI MOLECULAR IMAGING FOR THE CLASSIFICATION OF HER2 RECEPTOR STATUS IN BREAST CANCER TISSUES

    Sören-Oliver Deininger

    Sören-Oliver Deininger, Marketing Manager MALDI Imaging, Bruker

  • MALDI imaging is an emerging molecular imaging technology that allows untargeted mass spectrometric images directly from tissue sections
  • The technique was used here to compare protein profiles from HER2 positive and negative breast cancer cases
  • Classification was possible and a potential new biomarker was identified
  • 14:40 BIOMARKER INVESTIGATION VIA STABLE ISOTOPE LABELLING AND MASS SPECTROMETRY OF NON-SMALL LUNG CANCER SERUM

    Gabriela Grigorean

    Gabriela Grigorean, Co-Ordinator, Mass Spectrometry Unit, European Institute Of Oncology

  • Perspective on efficacy of using serum depletion to remove most abundant proteins - will it hinder the finding of biomarkers?
  • Quantitative mass spectrometric data analysis - comments on obtaining valid results for potential lung cancer biomarkers
  • An up-to-date evaluation of how biomarker lists generated by various researchers compare
  • Advantages and problems of mass spectrometry in performing rapid, robust serum analyses as a supporting technique in oncological imaging
  • 15:15 Afternoon tea

    15:45 IMAGING NORMAL AND CANCER STEM CELLS

    Gordon McVie

    Gordon McVie, Senior Consultant, Scientific Directorate, European Institute Of Oncology

  • Cancer stem cells are resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy
  • They are probably responsible for late relapse and resistant metastatic disease
  • Their characterisation and detection are therefore crucial to improved patient outcomes
  • Gene signatures and critical molecular pathways have already been identified for breast cancer
  • First in vitro images have been achieved
  • 16:20 NANOPARTICLES IN IMAGING

    Peter King

    Peter King, Senior Scientist, Oncology Discovery Research, Johnson & Johnson

  • Determining how aggressive cancer cells are
  • Practicalities of in-vivo use of nanoparticles
  • Separating biopsied cancer cells based on stage of progression
  • Discovering resistaqnce of cancer cells to drugs
  • 16:55 THE CANCER IMAGING PROGRAMME AT EORTC

    Jocelyne Flament

    Jocelyne Flament, Co-Ordinator Imaging Platform, EORTC

  • Development
  • Capabilities
  • Future
  • 17:30 Chairman’s closing remarks and close of day one

    8:30 Re-registration & coffee

    9:00 Chairman's opening remarks

    Philip Murphy

    Philip Murphy, Director of Imaging, Oncology Medicines Development Centre, GlaxoSmithKline

    9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS: NEW APPROACHES TO IMAGING TUMOUR RESPONSE TO TREATMENT

    Philip Murphy

    Philip Murphy, Director of Imaging, Oncology Medicines Development Centre, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Going beyond simply assessing tumour size
  • Need to get early and instant assessment
  • Drug development potential
  • 9:50 NEW GENERIC ALGORITHMS FOR FINER DETERMINATION OF TUMOUR BOUNDARIES

    Sabine McNeill

    Sabine McNeill, Founder and Director, 3D Metrics

  • Innovative imaging algorithms offer new level of precision for viewing tumour boundaries with the eye
  • 'Software lenses' can be applied to any type of image
  • Possibility of analysing thousands of images
  • Mammographs and other tumour examples will be presented
  • 10:30 DETECTING TREATMENT RESPONSE USING HYPERPOLARISED MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING

    Kevin Brindle

    Kevin Brindle, Professor of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University of Cambridge and Cancer Research UK

  • A technique that increases sensitivity in MRI by >10,000 times
  • Allows imaging of cellular metabolites and their subsequent metabolism in vivo
  • Can use this metabolic imaging to detect treatment response in tumours
  • 11:10 Morning coffee

    11:40 COMBINING QUANTIFICATION AND STATISTICAL INFERENCE IN MRI FOR ONCOLOGY

    Brandon Whitcher

    Brandon Whitcher, Director, MRI Modelling, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Quantitative analysis of clinical imaging (MRI or PET) in drug development
  • Data analysis of combining parameter estimation and statistical inference
  • Examples in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for treatment response in oncology
  • 12:20 INTEGRATING DYNAMIC CONTRAST-ENHANCED MRI AND GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN BREAST CANCER

    Nick Hughes

    Nick Hughes, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Oxford and Stanford University

  • Characterising neo-angiogenesis from clinical DCE-MRI scans
  • Identifying gene expression correlates of dynamic imaging features in breast cancer
  • Using combined imaging and gene expression data to better understand treatment response
  • 13:00 Networking lunch

    14:00 ROLE OF MR IMAGING IN BREAST CANCER MANAGEMENT

    Lindsay Turnbull

    Lindsay Turnbull, Professor of Radiology & Scientific Director, Centre for MR Investigations, University of Hull

  • Use of advanced imaging techniques
  • Local and distant staging
  • Use of MR as a biomarker
  • 14:40 VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY FOR BOTH IN VIVO AND EX VIVO CANCER DIAGNOSTICS

    Nick Stone

    Nick Stone, Head of Biophotonics Research Unit, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • Using Raman and FTIR to probe molecular specifc changes associated with carcinogenesis process
  • In vivo endoscopic detection and molecular diagnosis of pre-malignancies using Raman fibre probes
  • Ex vivo molecular imaging using FTIR and Raman to provide an adjunct to histopathology
  • Deep Raman techniques for non-invasive diagnosis with light in solid organs
  • 15:20 Afternoon tea

    15:50 LOGISTICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF IMAGING IN MULTI-COUNTRY ONCOLOGY CLINICAL TRIALS

    Ridwaan Jhetam

    Ridwaan Jhetam, Senior Director, Global Clinical Operations Head of Oncology, Johnson & Johnson

  • Challenges during various stages of a trial
  • Common pitfalls and how to avoid them
  • Case study showing lessons learned and challenges encountered
  • Role of sponsor, vendor partners and investigators to ensure imaging requirements are met in oncology trials
  • 16:30 A REGULATORY-COMPLIANT PROCESS FOR SHARING MEDICAL IMAGES IN SUPPORT OF MULTI-CENTRE ONCOLOGY CLINICAL TRIALS

    Omer Casher

    Omer Casher, Manager, Medical Imaging IT, GSK Clinical Imaging Centre

  • Direct image transfer from CROs to the GSK Clinical Imaging Centre (CIC) data management system over the internet
  • Automated medical image QC, including the de-identification of patient data
  • Full end-to-end image traceability
  • Significant cost savings made whilst security and reliability improved
  • 17:10 Chairman’s closing remarks and close of conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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