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The plethora of genomic information now in the public domain has to be sifted through and analysed if the perceived value of this data in the discovery of new therapeutics is to be realised. The functions of the genes and how they are implicated in disease pathways has to be elucidated further. Functional genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics are being employed in this endeavour, the most successful companies are the ones which effectively integrate these technologies in order to obtain maximal value from the data.

This conference brings together the leaders in the new technology arena from both the biotechnology industry and the pharmaceutical industry. It will demonstrate how the leaders in the biotechnology market are utilising data to produce therapeutic targets and the drugs of tomorrow. It draws upon case studies to demonstrate effective methods to integrate new technologies in order to speed up the pace of therapeutic discovery and development.

Companies attending SMi pharmaceutical events include:
3M Healthcare Pharmaceuticals - Abbott Laboratories - Amgen - AstraZeneca - Baxter Healthcare – Bayer - Boehringer Ingelheim - Bristol-Myers Squibb - Eli Lilly - GlaxoWellcome - Hoffmann-La Roche - Janssen-Cilag - Johnson & Johnson - Knoll AG – Lederle - Merck Sharp & Dohme - Novartis - Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals - Parke-Davis - Pasteur Merieux MSD Ltd - Pharmacia & Upjohn - Pfizer Corporation - RhÔne-Poulenc Rorer - Proctor & Gamble - Schering-Plough - Smith & Nephew - SmithKline Beecham – Synthelabo - Warner Lambert - Wyeth Ayerst

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Neil MacKenzie

Dr Neil MacKenzie, Business Development Director, Oxford Biomedica

9:10 FROM GENES TO DRUGS

Dr Mark Swindells

Dr Mark Swindells, Chief Scientific Officer, Inpharmatica

  • The human genome cloned: what will come next?
  • The potential of determining function and role of the genes
  • Identification of potential therapeutic targets
  • Impact of genomic data on pharmaceutical research to date
  • The future for the biotech and pharmaceutical industry
  • 9:40 BOTTLENECKS IN DRUG DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT

    Dr Patrick Kleyn

    Dr Patrick Kleyn, Chief Scientific Officer, Gemini Research

  • Using accelerated positional cloning to identify large numbers of potential targets
  • Validating genetic targets with human clinical information
  • Identifying factors in common, complex, age-related illnesses
  • Success of genomics strategies to date
  • 10:20 THE USE OF FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS AS A RESEARCH TOOL

    Dr Hartmut Voss

    Dr Hartmut Voss, Vice President Genomics, LION Biosciences

  • Identify the genes: what next?
  • What can functional genomics achieve?
  • Technologies used in the functional genomics arena
  • Success of functional genomics strategies to date
  • The role for functional genomics within the framework of traditional research approaches
  • 11:00 Morning coffee

    11:20 GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING

    Dr Edward Zanders

    Dr Edward Zanders, Senior Scientist, GlaxoWellcome

  • The value of applying genomic technologies to auto-immune research
  • Methods to monitor inflammatory processes using gene expression profiling
  • Drug discovery and gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis
  • Future directions for GlaxoWellcome and gene expression profiling
  • 12:00 SPEEDING UP TOXICITY TESTING

    Dr Jan Mous

    Dr Jan Mous, Global Head of Genomic Technology, Hoffmann-La Roche

  • The technology platform at Hoffmann-La Roche
  • Development of microarray technology
  • How can microarrays be used in toxicity testing?
  • Results to date: how are microarrays impacting on the speed and sensitivity of toxicity testing?
  • Expense vs speed: do microarrays pay their way?
  • Future development and potential for microarray technology
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 FROM GENOMICS TO THERAPEUTICS

    Dr Kevin Pritchard

    Dr Kevin Pritchard, Head of Protein Chemistry, Cambridge Antibody Technology

  • Industrialised phage antibody technology
  • Human monoclonal antibodies: opportunities in functional genomics
  • The ProAb programme: phage antibodies as specific molecular probes
  • Cont1nuity™ Bioinformatics - image based data mining
  • Human monoclonal antibodies in the clinic
  • 14:40 INTEGRATING PROTEOMICS AND GENOMICS

    Dr Mark Egerton

    Dr Mark Egerton, Vice President, Incyte

  • Progress in integrating RNA and protein expression technologies
  • Methodologies for comparing RNA and protein expression data content
  • How will expression data contribute to our understanding of disease processes?
  • How can expression studies impact on toxicological studies?
  • Developing the technology: what does the future hold?
  • Combining necessary skills through partnership
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 HUMAN PHENOMICS IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Alastair Riddell

    Dr Alastair Riddell, Chief Executive Officer, Pharmagene

  • Using phenomics to elucidate disease mechanisms
  • Integrating human genomics, proteomics and pharmacology into biological mechanisms
  • Converting knowledge of mechanism into useful targets for drug intervention
  • Targets identified to date
  • The value of human pre-clinical testing
  • 16:20 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER IN BIOTECHNOLOGY

    Dr George Rahim

    Dr George Rahim, Technical Manager, MMI

  • Examining the technological needs of your organisation
  • Finding the right technology to develop your business
  • Establishing the best route to obtain the technology: licensing and partnerships
  • Business Incubation
  • Intellectual property right issues in technology transfer
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Drinks Reception

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Richard Judson

    Dr Richard Judson, Chief Executive Officer, Gennaissance

    9:10 PHARMACOGENOMICS AND CLINICAL TRIALS

    Dr Fred Ledley

    Dr Fred Ledley, Principle Scientific Advisor, Variagenics

  • Impact of pharmacogenomics on the cost of drug development and clinical trials
  • Potential value of pharmacogenomics in clinical trials
  • Is it possible to incorporate pharmacogenomics into clinical trials?
  • Scaling down the complexity of the problems addressed in clinical trial
  • Haplotype vs SNP association studies
  • The need for new technologies in pharmacogenomics
  • 9:40 GENOTYPING IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Dr Larry Altstiel

    Dr Larry Altstiel, Group Leader Neurodegenerative Disorders, Eli Lilly

  • The role of the ApoE4 allele in late-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease
  • Methodology employed in the Xanomeline trial
  • Effect of integrating pharmacogenomics on trial length and costs
  • Overall study results
  • The future for pharmacogenomics at Eli Lilly
  • 10:20 IMPROVING THE ACCESSIBILITY OF BIOINFORMATICS

    Eli Mintz

    Eli Mintz, President, Compugen

  • The multitude of genomic databases
  • Uses of bioinformatics
  • Is bioinformatics being used effectively in drug discovery and development?
  • Development of user friendly software: user requirements
  • Providing the right tools with the right training
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 EFFECTIVE USE OF BIOINFORMATICS

    Christophe Person

    Christophe Person, Vice President of Informatics, Lexicon Genetics

  • High-throughput analysis of public and proprietary databases
  • Using bioinformatics to identify the most promising targets
  • Gene Trapping and Genomic Databases
  • Effective use of Medline in data mining
  • Targets identified at Lexicon
  • Lexgen.com: Using the Internet for drug discovery in the post-genome area
  • 12:00 INTEGRATING DISCOVERY INFORMATICS

    Manuel Glynias

    Manuel Glynias, President & Chief Executive Officer, NetGenics

  • The value of an integration strategy
  • Two aspects to integration: technical & domain
  • Technical integration through a Component Framework
  • Future support for evolutionary change and incremental growth
  • Domain integration example
  • Proposed solutions: which approach is best?
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 DATAMINING TO IDENTIFY NOVEL TARGETS

    Dr Michael Jackson

    Dr Michael Jackson, Senior Director, The R. W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute

  • Overview of the technology at Johnson & Johnson
  • Global sequence mining and identification of ‘best bet target families’
  • Applying microarray technology to filter out genes of interest
  • Laser capture microdissection: direct comparison of gene expression patterns in diseased vs normal cells
  • Extrapolating gene expression data to pathways of interest: global datamining
  • Targets of interest identified to date
  • 14:40 BIOINFORMATICS AND DEVELOPMENT OF PROTEIN THERAPEUTICS

    Dr Henrik Vissing

    Dr Henrik Vissing, Head of Bioinformatics & Genomics, Novo Nordisk

  • The value of developing therapeutic proteins
  • Using bioinformatics to discover therapeutic protein targets
  • The importance of good genomic and proteomic databases for effective use of bioinformatics
  • Is there a role for bioinformatics in therapeutic protein development?
  • The future of therapeutic protein development: new therapeutic areas to target
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 IDENTIFICATION OF NEW ANTI-FUNGALS

    Dr Richard Wobbe

    Dr Richard Wobbe, Senior Director Drug Discovery, Scriptgen

  • Target selection criteria for anti-fungals
  • Identification of potential gene targets: effective bioinformatics
  • GATE technology: target validation and the elucidation of gene function
  • Targets identified to date
  • A generalized high-throughput screening approach for dealing with newly identified targets, even those of unknown function
  • Application of target validation technologies to drug mechanism of action studies
  • 16:20 IDENTIFICATION OF LEAD COMPOUNDS

    Dr Mark Brann

    Dr Mark Brann, President & Chief Scientific Officer, ACADIA Pharmaceuticals

  • Using genomics to identify selective compounds
  • Methodology employed in screening compounds against the M1 receptor genes
  • Involvement of the M1 receptor in Alzheimer’s disease and desirability of selective M1 ligands
  • Number and type of leads produced using this method
  • Progress to date: have these leads followed through?
  • Is the use of more selective compounds the answer for Alzheimer’s disease therapeutics?
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Effective Licensing and Collaborations in the Biotechnology Industry
    Workshop

    Effective Licensing and Collaborations in the Biotechnology Industry

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    5th April 2000
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

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