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There are many forms of arthritis, each quite unique in its pathogenesis and aetiolgy. Indeed, few of us will escape arthritis entirely, with an estimated 350 million people world-wide suffering from the disease. The incidence of this disease has increased significantly in recent years and this is set to continue as the baby boom generation reaches retirement, contributing to the ageing population of the west. Second only to heart disease, arthritis is a major cause of work disability, amounting to huge costs in terms of direct medical care, lost wages and indirect costs.

There is certainly an incentive to discover novel ways of treating and relieving the symptoms of arthritis. The market for anti-arthritic and pain-relieving drugs is an extremely lucrative one. The pharmaceutical industry has seen growth between 3 and 7% in recent years, which forecasters predict will be sustained in 2002.

Following the success of previous conferences SMi appreciate the need to keep up to date with developments in this rapidly progressing industry. The conference will combine the inputs of those involved in all aspects of understanding and treating arthritis, from the development of novel drugs to safety issues and commercial aspects. With this is mind, the conference will focus on key issues including the role of genomics in finding new treatments, the impact of COX-2 inhibitors, antibody therapies and DNA vaccine technology. You will be given the chance to meet with your peers and exchange ideas that will help carry anti-arthritic agents into the future.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Souhil Zaim

Dr Souhil Zaim, Director, Radiology Services, Synarc

9:10 RESEARCH TRENDS IN DISEASE-MODIFYING AGENTS FOR ARTHRITIS

Dr Philip Simon

Dr Philip Simon, Executive Director, Arthritis & Bone Metabolism, Novartis

  • Symptom modification versus disease modification
  • Pathogenesis of joint destruction in RA and OA
  • Role of cytokines and prospects for anti-cytokine therapies
  • Role of matrix degrading enzymes and the prospects for enzyme inhibitors
  • Potential new developments with NSAIDs and steroids
  • Need for surrogate markers for OA: the OA initiative
  • 9:40 MATRIX METALLOPROTEASE INHIBITORS

    Dr Yetunde Taiwo

    Dr Yetunde Taiwo, Associate Director, Arthritis & Bone Research, Procter & Gamble

  • Matrix metalloprotease family of enzymes- mode of action
  • Structural basis for inhibitor selectivity profiles
  • Mechanistic basis for disease modification in arthritis
  • Efficacy in pre-clinical models
  • Clinical profile of MMP inhibitors
  • Muscoskeletal syndrome- current hypothesis and strategies
  • 10:20 DEVELOPMENT OF P38 MAP KINASE AND ICE/CASPASE-1 INHIBITORS

    John Randle

    John Randle, Program Executive, Vertex

  • Two novel approaches that inhibit production and signalling of the cytokines TNFa, IL-1b and IL-18
  • Broad potential clinical applications as anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory drugs: arthritis and beyond
  • Structure-based drug design of potent, selective, orally active P38 and ICE/caspase-1 inhibitors
  • Lead development candidates (VX-745 and pralnacasan) and follow-up compounds
  • Anti-cytokine therapies: small molecules in oral tablets vs. injectable proteins
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 NOVEL KINASE TARGETS AND INHIBITORS FOR THE TREATMENT OF INFLAMMATORY DISEASES

    Dr Alan Lewis

    Dr Alan Lewis, President, Signal Research Division, Celgene

  • JNK
  • IKK & NF-kB
  • Upstream activators of p38 (MKK3, MKK6)
  • PKC
  • Progress to identify additional novel kinase targets
  • 12:00 NOVEL NON-INFLAMMATORY COMPOUND

    Dr Somesh Sharma,

    Dr Somesh Sharma,, Chief Scientific Officer, Calyx Therapeutics

  • TNFa inhibitors
  • Active in CIA, AIA animal model
  • Orally available, small molecule
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 CP1-1714: A NON-IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE INHIBITOR OF PROINFLAMMATORY GENE EXPRESSION

    Dr Paul Wood

    Dr Paul Wood, President & Chief Executive Officer, Centaur Pharmaceuticals

  • Inhibition of cytokine (TNFa and IL-1b) and toll receptor activation of MAPK and NFkB pathways
  • Lack of direct inhibition of MAPK
  • Tissue selectivity for inhibition of proinflammatory gene expression
  • Elimination of pannus formation in the CIA model at 1mg/kg orally
  • Lack of immunosuppression in the MLR
  • Lack of immunosuppression in vivo
  • 14:20 SelCIDS/ImiDs: POTENTIAL ANTI-ARTHRITIC AGENTS

    Dr David Stirling

    Dr David Stirling, Chief Scientific Officer & Executive Vice President, Pharmaceutical Research & Development, Celgene

  • Novel PDE4 inhibitors
  • Thalidomide analogues
  • Potent anti-TNF alfa activity
  • Immune modulation
  • Clinical Development
  • 15:00 THE ROLE OF CYTOKINE TRAPS IN THE TREATMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (RA)

    Dr Scott Mellis

    Dr Scott Mellis, Vice President, New Product Planning, Regeneron

  • Role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis
  • Initial advances in anti-cytokine therapy in RA
  • Proteins and preclinicals: high affinity, long-acting blockade of IL-1
  • IL-1 trap phase 1 results
  • Biomarkers useful in the assessment of anticytokine therapy
  • Emerging cytokine traps and their potential roles
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 UNDERSTANDING RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    Thomas Paterson

    Thomas Paterson, Chief Scientific Officer, Entelos

  • Overview of computer-based disease models and their advantages over animal models
  • Approach for developing human in silico models, including characterisation and simulation of RA patient types
  • Addressing variability in RA patient types: what are the causes?
  • Developing the right treatment for the right patient at the right time
  • Novel target identification and validation strategies
  • Novel treatment and clinical trial optimisation strategies
  • 16:40 MANAGING THE IMAGING COMPONENT

    Klaus Noever

    Klaus Noever, Director, Business Development & Clinical Affairs, Bio-Imaging Technologies

  • Regulatory requirements
  • X-ray imaging of hands and feet
  • Process management by the imaging core-lab
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr K Wayne Marshall

    Dr K Wayne Marshall, President and Chiefe Executive Officer, ChondroGene

    9:10 VAP-1: A NOVEL DRUG DEVELOPMENT TARGET

    Dr Timo Veromaa

    Dr Timo Veromaa, Vice President, Drug Development, BioTie Therapies

  • Dual Role of VAP-1 in autoimmune inflammation
  • Target for antibody therapy as a non-classical, inflammation-inducible endothelial cell adhesion molecule
  • Development program of vapaliximab, a humanised anti-VAP-1 monoclonal antibody in a unique IgG2delta: a frame with enhanced affinity for FxgammaRIIb
  • Introducing VAP-1 SSAO (semicarbazide sensitive amine oxidase) as a target for small molecule inhibitors
  • Status of the development program of VAP-1 SSAO inhibitors for rheumatoid arthritis
  • 9:40 ANTIBODIES TO INTERFERON-g IN THE THERAPY OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES

    Dr Simon Skurkovich

    Dr Simon Skurkovich, Vice President, Research & Development, Advanced Biotherapy

  • Objective: assess the efficacy and tolerability of anti-IFN-g in treating patients with active RA
  • Methods: in a double-blind trial we randomly assigned 30 patients with active RA to receive intramuscular injections, including anti-IFN-g
  • Results: anti-IFN-g was significantly superior to placebo. By the 28th day anti-IFN-g showed significant improvement in 5 clinical measures including numbers of swollen and painful joints, pain and fatigue
  • Discussion: the results suggest that IFN-g was can play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA. The use of antibodies to this cytokine can be considered a promising approach to the therapy of RA, especially its treatment-resistant forms
  • 10:20 ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ENGINEERING WITH PROTEINS

    Dr Richard Smith

    Dr Richard Smith, Chief Scientific Officer, AdproTech

  • The concept behind membrane-targeted biopharmaceuticals
  • Application to complement regulators and derivation of a drug candidate
  • Relevance of complement activation to RA
  • Animal models, local and systemic use and safety evaluation
  • Human studies
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO DRUG THERAPY FOR ARTHRITIS

    Dr Alan Rothaul

    Dr Alan Rothaul, Senior Pharmacologist, Arakis

  • Cytokine modulation
  • Dosing options
  • Chrono therapy
  • 12:00 NO-RELEASING DRUGS AS POTENT ANTI-ARTHRITIC AGENTS

    Dr Jean Luc Burgaud

    Dr Jean Luc Burgaud, External Research Collaborations Manager, NicOx

  • Role of NO on arthritis
  • Rational use of a NO-NSAID
  • In vitro data
  • In vivo animal data
  • Safety profile in animals
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 FAST DISSOLVE: A GREAT NEW DOSAGE FORM FOR PAIN THERAPY

    Dr John Siebert

    Dr John Siebert, President & Chief Executive Officer, CIMA LAB

  • Fast dissolve is a new dosage form
  • Initial success in respiratory
  • Maxalt MLTTM leads the way
  • ZomigÄ RapimeltÄ excels
  • Commonality with other therapeutic categories
  • Arthritis is pain

    Fast dissolve: a new dosage form for arthritis

  • 14:20 MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL THERAPY: APPLICATIONS IN JOINT DISEASE

    Dr Frank Barry

    Dr Frank Barry, Director, Arthritis Research, Osiris Therapeutics

  • Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are resident in the bone marrow throughout normal adult life and have the capacity to differentiate along a number of connective tissue pathways, among them bone, cartilage and fat
  • These cells have the potential to repair defects in cartilage, bone and other connective tissues
  • In the knee joint, damage to the meniscus and ligament leads to the onset of degenerative changes
  • When MSCs are delivered to the injured knee joint by intra-articular injection there is evidence of regeneration of lost meniscal tissue
  • Effective repair therapies involve the use of allogeneic or universal cell preparations, without immunosuppression
  • Formation of new meniscal tissue potentially offers some degree of protection and slows the development of degenerative changes in the joint
  • 15:00 THE ROLE OF GENOMICS IN TACKLING ARTHRITIS

    Dr Jerry Lanchbury

    Dr Jerry Lanchbury, Reader, Molecular Immunogenetics, King’s College

  • Which genes cause arthritic diseases?
  • Which genes affect the progression of arthritic diseases?
  • The implications of the human genome project for arthritis research
  • Harnessing our genetic knowledge for use in arthritis therapy
  • A shared genetic etiology may clarify basic pathphysiology of autoimmune diseases, leading to real therapeutic advances
  • Using genetic make up to design individualised treatment regimes
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 CHONDROCYTE GENOMICS

    Dr K Wayne Marshall

    Dr K Wayne Marshall, President & Chief Executive Officer, ChondroGene

  • Current OA therapies only modify symptoms
  • Barriers to the development of disease-modifying OA therapies
  • Role of genomics in overcoming barriers
  • Critical role of quality tissue bank
  • Role of microarray technology in identifying disease pathways and novel targets
  • Potential therapeutic applications for novel targets
  • 16:40 BOTANICAL DRUGS AND OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Dr Reinhard März

    Dr Reinhard März, Head, Medical Science & Research, Bionorica

  • History: the evolution from botanical drugs to designing pharmacophores
  • Paradigms in pharmacotherapy: single vs. multiple targets
  • The pharmacology of willow bark in comparison to aspirin
  • Clinical efficacy and safety of willow bark
  • Other botanical drugs
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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