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Arthritis continues to represent a major challenge for the healthcare industry, both in terms of understanding the genetic and environmental causes and in terms of developing efficacious, safe, practical treatments.

The number of arthritis medications on the market continues to expand and, whilst the choice of remedies is now quite bewildering, there remains plenty of scope for new and improved solutions for the various forms of arthritis, which can have such a drastic effect on the lives of sufferers.

Following the developments of blockbuster painkillers for arthritis, there have been considerable investment in refining and improving NSAIDs and COX-2 Inhibitors. In addition there is now an increasing impatience for the development of drugs that actually act to arrest the progression of the disease or even reverse bone and cartilage damage. Pharmaceutical and biotech companies are responding to this pressure and searching for disease-modifying drugs that can be prescribed earlier in the treatment programme.

The conference will aim to take a look at the latest developments in this search. It will examine how an ever-increasing understanding of genetics can be applied to arthritis relief, how obstacles in drug development and clinical trials can be minimised and how tools for assessing the progression of the disease can be improved. The programme will discuss the use of drugs in combination and how we can reduce the side-effects and safety concerns associated with many anti-arthritic agents to date.

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
Dr Chris Reilly, Vice President, Respiratory & Inflammation Research Area, AstraZeneca
Tim Shaw, Clinical Science Leader, Roche Products
Dr Christopher Pargellis, Senior Principal Scientist, Boehringer Ingelheim
Dr Rocco Cirillo, Head, Experimental Pharmacology, LCG-RBM, Serono Discovery
Dr Alan Lewis, President, Celgene Dr Reginald Brys, Senior Scientist, Galapagos Genomics
Chris McKenna, Director, Business Development, Immunology & Inflammation, Entelos
Dr Scott Mellis, Vice President, New Product Planning, Regeneron

“The event exceeded my expectations and was a valuable experience. It was truly a pleasure to work with the SMi staff”.
Dr Scott Mellis, Vice President, New Product Planning, Regeneron SMi’s Anti-Arthritic Agents Conference, 2002

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Scott Mellis

Dr Scott Mellis, Vice President, New Product Planning, Regeneron

9:10 A NOVEL APPROACH TO THE DESIGN OF ANTI-ARTHRITIC DRUGS

Dr Robin Bannister

Dr Robin Bannister, Director, Research & Development, Arakis

  • Cytokine modulation a key mechanism
  • Next generation small molecules
  • Drug targeting
  • 9:40 PRECLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY OF NEW ANTI-ARTHRITIC DRUGS

    Dr Rocco Cirillo

    Dr Rocco Cirillo, Head, Experimental Pharmacology, Serono

  • Overview of experimental models of arthritis
  • Class distinction of agents inhibiting arthritis
  • Intracellular kinases as new targets to treat arthritis
  • 10:20 NEW AND EMERGING THERAPIES FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Tim Shaw

    Tim Shaw, Clinical Science Leader, Roche Products

  • Overview of recently approved therapies for RA
  • Mechanism of action, efficacy and safety of existing therapies
  • Novel approaches and therapeutic targets
  • Review of clinical data on emerging treatments
  • Role of B cells in RA
  • B cell targeted therapies in the treatment of RA
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS

    Dr Reginald Brys

    Dr Reginald Brys, Senior Scientist, Galapagos Genomics

  • Processes involved in rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis
  • Translation into functional genomics compatible assays
  • Implementation on an adenovirus-based screening platform
  • 12:00 NOVEL APPROACHES TO THE TREATMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Dr Christopher Pargellis

    Dr Christopher Pargellis, Senior Principal Scientist, Boehringer Ingelheim

  • Structure-guided drug design
  • BIRB 796 is a slow tight binding kinase inhibitor utilising both allosteric and isosteric binding modes
  • Structural data indicate a change in kinase conformation is required for inhibitor binding
  • Inhibition of both kinase activity and kinase activation
  • DMARD properties demonstrated for BIRB 796 in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis
  • BIRB 796 is efficacious in an endotoxin challenge cytokine release model in man
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 TARGETING CYTOKINES: OF MICE AND TRAPS

    Dr Scott Mellis

    Dr Scott Mellis, Vice President, New Product Planning, Regeneron

  • Human genome sequence provides a vast abundance of novel genes with therapeutic potential
  • Novel technologies are required to determine gene function and validate drug targets
  • Emerging data from “Velocigene”, Regeneron’s high-throughput genetic engineering platform will be provided
  • Cytokines have important roles in the pathogenesis of arthritis
  • Cytokine traps replicate physiological binding mechanisms to generate high affinity cytokine inhibitors
  • Emerging data from Regeneron’s cytokine trap program will be provided
  • 14:20 PROOF OF STRUCTURAL DAMAGE PREVENTION

    Dr Klaus Noever

    Dr Klaus Noever, Director, Business Development & Clinical Affairs, Europe, Bio-Imaging Technologies

    15:00 MODULATION OF CARTILAGE MATRIX BREAKDOWN

    Dr Ellen Filvaroff

    Dr Ellen Filvaroff, Scientist, Genentech

  • Identification of active proteins
  • Biological validation
  • Understanding downstream signalling pathway
  • Creating possible therapeutics
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 NITRIC OXIDE (NO)–RELEASING GLUCOCORTICOIDS AS POTENT ANTI-ARTHRITIC AGENTS

    Dr Ennio Ongini

    Dr Ennio Ongini, Senior Director, Research, Nicox

  • Biological function of nitric oxide (NO)
  • Rationale underlying NO-releasing glucocorticoids
  • Activity in models of inflammation
  • Additional benefits due to NO
  • 16:40 NOVEL KINASE TARGETS

    Dr Brydon Bennett

    Dr Brydon Bennett, Senior Scientist, Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology, Celgene

    17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr David Stirling

    Dr David Stirling, Chief Scientific Officer & Executive Vice President, Pharmaceutical Research & Development, Celgene

    9:10 HUMANISING DRUG DISCOVERY IN ARTHRITIS

    Dr Chris Reilly

    Dr Chris Reilly, Vice President, Respiratory & Inflammation Research Area, AstraZeneca

  • Current understanding of pathophysiology in OA and RA
  • Critical unanswered questions for identification of new therapies, patient stratification, and trial design
  • Contribution of human disease tissue
  • Contribution of genomics
  • Contribution of genetics
  • Contribution of disease models
  • 9:40 BIOSIMULATION OF HUMAN RA PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR TARGET VALIDATION AND LEAD CANDIDATE EVALUATION

    Christopher McKenna

    Christopher McKenna, Director, Business Development, Immunology & Inflammation, Entelos

  • Developing a systems biology platform (RA PhysioLab® Platform) that reproduces RA pathophysiology in a prototypical human joint on timescales of hours to years
  • Extensive validation has been performed using marketed therapies to test model behaviours at molecular, cellular, and (sub)clinical levels
  • The platform can be modified to represent different hypotheses of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that impact inflammation and cartilage degradation in humans and those hypotheses can be explored and tested
  • Performing biosimulation research to investigate disease mechanisms, targets, pathways, biomarkers, drug candidates, therapies and patient types
  • The results of biosimulation research are driving wet lab experiments and clinical development strategies
  • The platform has been used to evaluate the physiologic crossroads in IL-1b and TNFa pathways

    Active research programs and development underway with the RA PhysioLab® Platform

  • 10:20 THE ER CHAPERONE BIP AS A NEW ANTI-ARTHRITIC BIOLOGIC

    Prof Gabriel Panayi

    Prof Gabriel Panayi, ARC Professor, Rheumatology, King’s College London

  • BiP is an ER chaperone
  • It can be secreted from cells during stress
  • It is found in rheumatoid arthritis joint fluids
  • It stimulates the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokine from monocytes
  • It both prevents and treats collagen induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 RATIONALE BEHIND THE DUAL INHIBITION OF CYCLOOXYGENASES (COX) AND 5-LIPOXYGENASE (5-LOX) FOR THE TREATMENT OF OSTEOARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Dr Wolfgang Albrecht

    Dr Wolfgang Albrecht, Head, Drug Research, Merckle

  • Gastro-intestinal, renal and cardiovascular toxicity of non-selective COX and selective COX-2 inhibitors
  • The relevance of lipoxygenase(s)-mediated metabolic pathways in inflammation physiology
  • Mechanisms of action of 5-LOX inhibitors and therapeutic applications
  • Medicinal chemistry of 5-LOX inhibitors and dual inhibitors of COX and 5-LOX
  • Current status of dual COX and 5-LOX inhibitors – promises, expectations and reality
  • 12:00 COX-2 INHIBITORS

  • Mechanism related to COX-2 transduction
  • Benefits, side effects and future prospects of COX-2 inhibitors
  • Role of COX-2 and 5-LO in arthritis and other disease conditions
  • Inhibitors of COX-2 – structural features
  • Newer COX-2 inhibitors
  • Dual COX-2 and 5-LO inhibitors
  • Dr Thennati Rajamannar

    Dr Thennati Rajamannar, Vice President, Sun Pharma Advanced Research Centre

    Dr C N Ramchand

    Dr C N Ramchand, Vice President, Sun Pharma Advanced Research Centre

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST VEGF RECEPTOR-1: A POTENTIAL NEW APPROACH TO TREAT INFLAMMATORY DISEASES

    Dr Peter Bohlen

    Dr Peter Bohlen, Senior Vice President, Research, ImClone Systems

  • VEGFR1 Mab inhibits disease progression in mouse models of arthritis
  • VEGFR1 Mab inhibits atherosclerosis in mice with Apo E deficiency
  • VEGFR1 is expressed on many cell types, including endothelial, inflammatory, and hematopoietic precursor cells
  • Although VEGFR1 is thought to be involved in angiogenesis, the major mechanism of action of VEGFR1 Mab is independent of endothelial cell function in these models
  • VEGFR1 Mab inhibits influx of inflammatory cells to sites of inflammation. The mechanism of this action is thought to be the inhibition of recruitment from bone marrow of hematopoietic precursor and inflammatory cells
  • 14:40 NOVEL INHIBITORS OF TNFa OVERPRODUCTION

    Dr David Stirling

    Dr David Stirling, Chief Scientific Officer & Executive Vice President, Pharmaceutical Research & Development, Celgene

  • Anti-inflammatory properties of thalidomide
  • Properties of novel thalidomide analogues
  • Novel PDE4 inhibitors
  • Activity in arthritis/inflammation models
  • Clinical progress of novel compounds
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 MEMBRANE-LOCALIZING BIOPHARMACEUTICALS IN ARTHRITIC DISEASE

    Dr Richard Smith

    Dr Richard Smith, Chief Scientific Officer, AdproTech

  • Pharmaco-reconstruction of membrane proteins as therapeutics
  • Role of complement-driven inflammation in RA
  • Membrane-targeted complement regulators and other agents
  • Preclinical and Phase I studies of APT070
  • Phase II studies in RA
  • 16:20 ARTHRITIS – A COMMERCIAL PERSPECTIVE

    Simon Wright

    Simon Wright, Lead Analyst - Arthritis, Respiratory, Gastrointestinal, Dermatological Disorders and Women's Health, Datamonitor Healthcare

  • How do patient presentation, diagnosis and treatment rates vary for OA and RA by country and where should companies focus their marketing efforts?
  • How do OA and RA treatment trends vary across the major markets and which drugs are being used the most? Will this be the same in five years time?
  • Is Pfizer’s Celebrex (celecoxib) or Merck’s Vioxx (rofecoxib) winning the battle for leadership in the COX-2 market? How will the launch of second-generation products such as Bextra (valdecoxib) and Arcoxia (etoricoxib) impact on the COX-2 franchises of Pfizer and Merck, respectively?
  • What impact will the entry of Novartis with Prexige (lumiracoxib) have on the COX-2 and wider NSAID market? What else is in the pipeline?
  • Once Amgen solves its production shortage, will Enbrel (etanercept) regain leadership of the DMARD biologics market from J&J’s Remicade (infliximab)?
  • Where does/will Aventis’s Arava (leflunomide), Abbott’s D2E7 (adalimumab) and Pfizer/Celltech’s CDP 870 fit into the DMARD ‘pecking order’?
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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