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What is this conference about?

Screening

SMi's industry-leading High Throughput Screening conference returns for its sixth year.  The theme of this year's conference will be how to lead HTS down an intelligent route towards lead generation.

Taking place in London, UK, this conference will look at a wide range of issues within the HTS arena under several 'topic umbrellas'.  The State of the Industry will look at the best of HTS now, outsourcing and hit-to-lead bottlenecks.  Focussing HTS will investigate methods to increase the quality of the leads generated.  There will be in-depth studies into In-Silico Screening and GPCRs, and finally, a look to the future in New Screening Technologies.

Questions examined during the conference will include: how successful is HTS now?  Is outsourcing worthwhile economically?  What are the IP issues?  Can intelligent research outperform HTS?  Does iterative screening hold the key to obtaining high quality leads?  How can we redesign the HTS framework?  Do we rely on established assays too much?  Can virtual screening ever replace HTS as the standard lead generator?  How can HTS be used successfully in harnessing the power of GPCRs?  What is the potential for biophysical tools to be used in screening?

Attend this event to discover how High Throughput Screening can be made more intelligent, more focussed and more beneficial in drug discovery

 

Fancy speaking at the conference?  Do you know of anyone who may be interested in speaking?  We are always on the look-out for new speakers for our upcoming conferences.  Let us know: smiproduction@smi-online.co.uk.


For sponsorship and exhibitioning opportunities, contact sponsorshipdept@smi-online.co.uk 

Why should you attend the event?

Delegates at this conference will learn about

  • Successes and failures of HTS now
  • Hit validation strategies
  • Overcoming bottlenecks by focussing HTS
  • Iterative screening
  • Synergistic process design
  • Assaying new target classes
  • In-silico screening
  • Screening for GPCRs
  • Fragment screening
  • Biophysical tools for screening
 Screening 1
 Screening 2

How you will benefit from attending this conference

Hear from some of the most important and influential experts working in HTS

Learn about changing the way we do HTS to increase the quality of lead generation

Study what the realistic alternatives are to HTS, and what potential they hold

Network with people you need to know in the HTS world

Who should attend the conference?

Chief Executives, Vice Presidents, Heads, Directors, Chief Scientists and Project Leaders of

  • High Throughput Screening
  • High Content Screening
  • Lead Generation
  • Virtual Screening / In-Silico Screening
  • Screening
  • Discovery Chemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Imaging
  • Molecular Discovery Research
  • Molecular Biology and Chemistry
  • Quality Assurance
  • Data interpretation
  • Regulatory Affairs
  • Research and Development

 Delegates at our 2009 HTS conference came from across the world

Graph of delegate countries

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and coffee

9:00 Chairman's opening remarks

Francois Bertelli

Francois Bertelli, Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer

9:10 LEAD DISCOVERY STRATEGIES - ONE SIZE FITS ALL, OR HORSES FOR COURSES?

Murray Brown

Murray Brown, Manager, Data Interpretation and Business Process, Screening and Compound Profiling, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Challenges for lead discovery
  • Different approaches to hit identification in GSK including diversity HTS, fragments and encoded libraries
  • Strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches
  • 9:50 HOW SUCCESSFUL IS HTS?

    Niklas Blomberg

    Niklas Blomberg, Associate Director, Computational Chemistry, AstraZeneca

  • Overview of new target prosecutions - comparison with the recent past
  • Number of target prosecutions compared with rise in HTS
  • Major failings of HTS - potential for overcoming
  • 10:30 HIT VALIDATION STRATEGIES

    Ulrich Hassiepen

    Ulrich Hassiepen, Research Investigator II, Novartis

  • Level of the need to reduce false positives
  • Impact of assay technologies
  • Counter-screening approaches
  • Screening in a more bio-relevant form
  • 11:10 Morning coffee

    11:40 WHEN A MILLION IS TOO MANY - MAXIMISING HTS RETURNS FROM TRUNCATED RANDOM SCREENING SUBSETS

    Willem Nissink

    Willem Nissink, Associate Principal Scientist, AstraZeneca

  • Using an incremental HTS-set subsetting design to facilitate managing the cost of screening a >>1M compound collection
  • Rationale, implementation, expectations and results
  • Use of frequent-hitter information from historical HTS data for annotation of new screen results
  • 12:20 HCS AND MULTI-PARAMETER READOUTS: DE-RISKING DRUG DISCOVERY PROGRAMME

    Katya  Tsaioun

    Katya Tsaioun, President, Apredica

  • Technology and its validation - review
  • Mechanisms of human toxicity - how what you do not know may hurt you
  • Streamlining and reducing the cost of hit-to-lead and lead optimisation campaigns
  • Advanced lead profiling - case studies
  • 13:00 Networking lunch

    14:00 IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR HCS AND HTS

    Alessandro Esposito

    Alessandro Esposito, Senior Investigator Scientist, MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Cambridge University

  • Unsupervised fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy
  • Identifying molecular or cellular sub-populations
  • Practical application and case studies
  • 14:40 ON THE IMPACT OF VIRTUAL SCREENING IN LEAD GENERATION

    Stefan Schmitt

    Stefan Schmitt, Team Leader, Computational Chemistry, AstraZeneca

  • Integration of virtual screening in the lead discovery process
  • Good practice for virtual screening
  • Performance of VS in comparison to parallel running HTS approach
  • 15:20 Afternoon tea

    15:50 IN-SILICO VERSUS WET SCREENING IN THE CONTEXT OF INTEGRATION STRATEGIES

    George Keseru

    George Keseru, Head of Discovery Chemistry, Gedeon Richter

  • Case study involving a kinase associated with Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases
  • HTS and in-silico screening carried out separately for direct comparison of utility
  • How should the industry combine HTS and in-silico to optimise lead generation
  • 16:30 IN SILICO SCREENING IN SUPPORT OF DRUG DISCOVERY

    James Campbell

    James Campbell, Director, Lead Generation, AstraZeneca

  • Defining in silico screening - virtual screening, predictive models and database mining
  • Exploiting in silico screening - early drug discovery
  • Effective techniques in modern drug discovery
  • 17:10 Chairman’s closing remarks and close of day one

    8:30 Re-registration and coffee

    9:00 Chairman's opening remarks

    Peter O'Brien

    Peter O'Brien, Veterinary Clinical Pathologist, University College Dublin

    9:10 COPING WITH PROCESS ERROR WITHIN A HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING CAMPAIGN

    Nicola Richmond

    Nicola Richmond, Investigator, GlaxoSmithKline

  • The impact of process error on hit rate and compound selection
  • Minimising false positives and false negatives using computational methods
  • Designing HTS compound triaging strategies in the presence of process error
  • 9:50 SCREENING AND PATHWAY BIOLOGY

    Peter Ghazal

    Peter Ghazal, Head of Division of Pathway Medicine, University of Edinburgh

  • Understanding transcriptional regulatory networks and host pathogen interactions
  • Developing new methods for mapping of complex biological systems
  • Applications in the treatment and diagnosis of immune-related diseases
  • 10:30 HOW TO OPTIMISE SCREENING ASSAYS FOR ORPHAN OR LIGANDED GPCRs

    Michel Detheux

    Michel Detheux, Director FAST Business Unit, Euroscreen SA

  • Assay development
  • Assay validation
  • Assay optimization
  • Case studies
  • 11:10 Morning coffee

    11:40 MODELLING NANOPARTICLE AND LIGAND INTERACTION IN FLEXIBLE RECEPTOR MODELS

  • Screening with biophysical models
  • Enrichment rates for flexible receptor models
  • Towards flexible backbone simulations and induced fit
  • Wolfgang Wenzel

    Wolfgang Wenzel, Scientist, Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

    12:20 HIGH CONTENT SCREENING: A CELL MORPHOLOGY BASED SCREEN TO IDENTIFY NOVEL REGULATORS OF CELL-CELL JUNCTIONS

    Ann Wheeler

    Ann Wheeler, Advanced Imaging Facility Manager, Queen Mary University Of London

  • High Content Imaging screen design
  • Analysis methods and data storage in High Content Imaging Screens
  • Data mining and post-hoc analysis of High Content Imaging Screens
  • 13:00 Networking lunch

    14:00 MAXIMISING THE IMPACT OF HTS ON THE PFIZER DISCOVERY PORTFOLIO

    John Mathias

    John Mathias, Head of HTS CoE, Pfizer

  • Assessment of the impact HTS has made on the recent Pfizer portfolio
  • The design of screening subsets to increase the efficiency of primary screening campaigns
  • 14:40 APPLICATION OF HIGH CONTENT ANALYSIS (HCA) IN DISCOVERING TOXICOLOGY SCREENING STRATEGIES

    Peter O'Brien

    Peter O'Brien, Veterinary Clinical Pathologist, University College Dublin

  • Evidence for effective use of HCA in cytotoxicity assessment of human toxicity potential
  • Salient criteria for predictive cytotoxicity models
  • Interpretation and application  of HCA cytotoxicity data for optimisation and prioritisation
  • Translational cytotoxicity biomarkers for application in drug discovery and development
  • Strategies for incorporation of HCA into drug discovery safety assessment
  • 15:20 Afternoon tea

    15:50 HTS - DEVELOPING FUTURE SUCCESS FROM PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE

    Peter Greasley

    Peter Greasley, Lead Generation Science & Strategy Manager, AstraZeneca

  • Working with target classes
  • Backing the right technologies
  • Introducing the right target with the right assay to the right chemistry
  • 16:30 THE FUTURE FOR HTS

    Francois Bertelli

    Francois Bertelli, Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer

  • Historical benefits of HTS (including assay technologies and target classes)
  • HTS under the current climate in the pharma industry
  • Future challenges of HTS - what is Pfizer doing?
  • 17:10 Chairman’s closing remarks and close of day two

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    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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