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Pain is the primary reason that patients seek medical care and the pain therapeutics industry is currently under financial strain. With this in mind, SMi are very pleased to present our 13th annual Pain Therapeutics conference which will highlight improvements in R&D methods and certifying that drugs being put forward for clinical trials are given the best chance to succeed. The conference will take place on the 20th and 21st of May 2013 and will provide a unique platform to engage with KOLs and esteemed academia in the field of pain therapeutics. With a spotlight on areas such as: current targets for analgesic development, personalised medicine, the cannabinoid approach , imaging modalities, experimental models in early phase clinical development & improving clinical trial success rates, Pain Therapeutics 2013 promises to be a truly unmissable event!

  • CASE STUDY focusing on key anti-NGF therapies for pain
  • Balance of clinical and pre-clinical considerations alongside therapeutic applications
  • Focus on novel pain therapeutics with low CNS side effects
  • Explore the application of epigenetics to answer challenging questions about established drugs
  • CASE STUDY highlighting Nav1.7 blockers for chronic pain alongside major conclusions
  • Spotlight on best practices for target selection criteria
  • Build strategic relationships with key players in the field of pain therapeutics

 

 New for 2013

  • Explore electrical hyperanalgesia and non-responsive pain trials
  • Balance of pre-clinical and clinical applications
  • Regulatory considerations for developing novel pain therapeutics

 

Heads of Department, Directors, Managers, Team Leaders Researchers and Scientists from:

Pain and inflammation target discovery
Analgesic preclinical development
CNS clinical trials
Translational imaging
Early phase CNS research
Epigenetics in pain and inflammation
Chronic and neuropathic pain
Clinical trial design
Biomarker development
Personalised medicine
Pain management
 

 

Anaesthetic Department; Apibrazil; Blackhawk Technical College; Capsticks Solicitors LLP; CMS Hasche Sigle GmbH; Defence Equipment & Support Organisation; Geneva Hospitality Group; H. BILAL & CO.,; HARRIS CORPORATION; Hitachi America Ltd; KEPCO; M T S Manufacturing Technical Solutions; Malaysian Amateur Radio Transmitters' Society (M.A.R.T.S); NAVFACPAC; Quattrogemini Ltd.; Raytheon Electronic Systems; Repsol Exploracion S.A.; SBM Offshore; Simulation Technologies Inc; Ternion Corp; Titan Systems,AP&D Division; Wisconsin Department of Tourism;

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Narender Gavva

Narender Gavva, Scientific Director, Amgen

9:10 Use of DNA directed RNA interference as a new approach to long term pain therapy

David Yeomans

David Yeomans, Director of Pain Research, Stanford University School Of Medicine

  • The advantages of an RNA interference approach to pain therapy
  • Rationale for target selection
  • Progress to date and challenges to overcome
  • 9:50 Novel readouts for the analysis of spontaneous pain in animals

    Thomas Christoph

    Thomas Christoph, Senior Director, Head of Pain Pharmacology, Grunenthal Gmb H

  • How do evoked methods compare with non-evoked?
  • Are innate responses of animals suitable measures for chronic pain?
  • Are different pain indications amenable to similar readouts?
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 Identification of modulators of chronic pain in native sensory neurons using a novel phenotypic assay

    Paul Karila

    Paul Karila, Head of Discovery Services, Cellectricon

  • Methodologies for detection of changes in neuronal excitability
  • Phenotypic approach enables detection of compounds acting along the peripheral sensitization pathway on previously unknown targets
  • Presentation of validation data and case study
  • Progress to date and challenges to overcome
  • 11:40 Optimising the context of medical treatments for arthritis pain

    David Walsh

    David Walsh, Director of the ARC National Pain Centre, University of Nottingham

  • The context within which treatments are given
  • Placebo and nocebo
  • The place of medical analgesia in patient pathways for chronic arthritis pain.
  • The person-specific context; mechanistic, diagnostic and severity-based approaches to stratified care
  • 12:20 Exploring the use of animal models to study pain pathways

    Huw Rees

    Huw Rees, Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer

  • Mechanistic studies; examining the role of NaV1.7 in rats and mice
  • Addressing bias in preclinical studies; being more clinical in experimental design
  • Future directions; re-evaluating the role of wide dynamic range neurones in models of nerve injury
  • 13:00 Networking Lunch

    14:20 Novel pain therapeutics with low CNS side effects

    Steve  Harrison

    Steve Harrison, Vice President, Research Biology, Nektar Therapeutics

  • Use of polymer conjugation technology to develop novel opioids with intrinsically low abuse liability
  • Analgesics for neuropathic pain with reduced CNS side effects
  • The future potential of polymer conjugation technology in pain therapy
  • 15:00 The use of biologic therapies in the treatment of pain - A CASE STUDY of anti-NGFs

    Iain Chessell

    Iain Chessell, VP R&D Neuroscience Innovative Medicines, MedImmune

  • Why consider biologic therapies for pain: pros and cons
  • Considerations around target selection
  • Case study: anti-NGF therapies
  • Translation from man to animal to man
  • Next steps for novel biologic therapies
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 A novel target for chronic migraine therapy: clinical demonstration of nasal oxytocin efficacy and safety

    David Yeomans

    David Yeomans, Director of Pain Research, Stanford University School Of Medicine

  • Oxytocin receptors are present on trigeminal pain-sensing neurons and are upregulated by painful inflammation
  • Nasal application of oxytocin concentrates the drug in the trigeminal system
  • Results of a 40 patient chronic migraine trial
  • 16:40 Panel Discussion - Pain therapeutics: where are we, and what is the potential for the future?

    Narender Gavva

    Narender Gavva, Scientific Director, Amgen

    17:10 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dave Shelton

    Dave Shelton, Senior Director, Pfizer Global Research & Development

    9:10 Translational mechanistic pain biomarkers

    Lars Arendt-Nielsen

    Lars Arendt-Nielsen, Director, Aalborg University

  • Phase I and II proof-of-concept
  • Pharmacodynamics &Mechanism based drug profiling
  • Healthy volunteer studies
  • Proof-of-mechanism
  • Translation of animal data into pain patients
  • 9:50 Human tissues as a translational tool in pain research and target identification

    Fiona Boissonade

    Fiona Boissonade, Head of Neuroscience Research Group, The University Of Sheffield

  • Studies of neuropathic pain
  • Studies of inflammatory pain
  • Correlation with pre-clinical models
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 Imaging the common brain substrates of chronic pain- it’s all anticipation

    Anthony Kenneth Peter Jones

    Anthony Kenneth Peter Jones, Professor of Neuro-Rheumatology, University of Manchester

  • Recent research to suggest that fundamental changes in physiology of chronic pain sufferers may alter their PD compared to experimental models of healthy patients
  • Can this research help to illuminate better ways at predicting drug PD in patients?
  • How do these physiological changes relate to pain?
  • 11:30 Translation of Preclinical Pain Models - what is missing?

    Sigal Meilin

    Sigal Meilin, Scientific Director, MD Biosciences

  • Current approach to developing pain therapies relies on mechanistic approach, however neuropathic pain in humans is rarely caused by a simple event
  • Commonly pain studies ignore the fact that pain is a complex process
  • New approach needs to consider relevant species, clinically relevant measures and understanding the emotional, learning and memory aspect of pain
  • 11:55 Novel targets in inflammatory and neuropathic pain

  • Inflammatory and neuropathic pain poorly treated by current analgesics – poor efficacy and many side effects
  • Recent work in the McNaughton lab has identified the HCN2 ion channel and the AKAP79 scaffolding protein as potential targets
  • Progress towards developing selective drugs
  • Peter McNaughton

    Peter McNaughton, Head of Pharmacology Department, Cambridge University

    12:35 Opiate development: how efficacy, side-effect profiling, and target engagement can be rapidly and cost-effectively established in Phase I

    John Connell

    John Connell, Vice President Clinical Pharmacodynamics, ICON Development Solutions

  • Can human pain models indicate efficacy in patients?
  • Role of PK-PD modeling and simulation in guiding dose selection for patient trials
  • What side effects of opiates can reasonably be explored in a healthy volunteer
  • Impact of FDA guidelines on opiate-abuse on early phase opiate development
  • 13:00 Networking Lunch

    14:00 Challenges in analgesic drug discovery

    Narender Gavva

    Narender Gavva, Scientific Director, Amgen

  • Emphasis is on preclinical discovery
  • Potential false-positive hotspots
  • Best practices for target selection criteria
  • 14:40 The use of anti-NGF agents in pain

    Dave Shelton

    Dave Shelton, Senior Director, Pfizer Global Research & Development

  • Novel approach to treating pain
  • anti-NGF in clinical trials
  • Challenges faced
  • Future of anti-NGF agents
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CASE STUDY: Phase 3 and phase 4 trial experience with Exparel for prolonged post operative analgesia

    Gary Patou

    Gary Patou, Chief Medical Officer, Pacira Pharmaceuticals Inc

  • Overview of Exparel and its mode of action
  • Discussion of the trial methodology used for drug approval
  • Phase 4 demonstration of health outcomes
  • 16:20 CASE STUDY: Focus on Nav1.7 blockers for chronic pain

    Valerie Morisset

    Valerie Morisset, Head of Electrophysiology, Convergence Pharmaceuticals

  • Overview of Nav1.7 blockers field
  • Preclinical properties of Nav1.7 blocker CNV1014802 / comparison with anti convulsants used in the clinic
  • Clinical development
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

    +

    FEATURED SPEAKERS

    Anthony Kenneth Peter Jones

    Anthony Kenneth Peter Jones

    Professor of Neuro-Rheumatology, University of Manchester
    Dave Shelton

    Dave Shelton

    Senior Director, Pfizer Global Research & Development
    Huw Rees

    Huw Rees

    Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer
    Iain Chessell

    Iain Chessell

    VP R&D Neuroscience Innovative Medicines, MedImmune
    Narender Gavva

    Narender Gavva

    Scientific Director, Amgen

    Anthony Kenneth Peter Jones

    Professor of Neuro-Rheumatology, University of Manchester
    Anthony Kenneth Peter Jones

    Dave Shelton

    Senior Director, Pfizer Global Research & Development
    Dave Shelton

    David Walsh

    Director of the ARC National Pain Centre, University of Nottingham
    David Walsh

    David Yeomans

    Director of Pain Research, Stanford University School Of Medicine
    David Yeomans

    Fiona Boissonade

    Head of Neuroscience Research Group, The University Of Sheffield
    Fiona Boissonade

    Gary Patou

    Chief Medical Officer, Pacira Pharmaceuticals Inc
    Gary Patou

    Huw Rees

    Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer
    Huw Rees

    Iain Chessell

    VP R&D Neuroscience Innovative Medicines, MedImmune
    Iain Chessell

    John Connell

    Vice President Clinical Pharmacodynamics, ICON Development Solutions
    John Connell

    Lars Arendt-Nielsen

    Director, Aalborg University
    Lars Arendt-Nielsen

    Narender Gavva

    Scientific Director, Amgen
    Narender Gavva

    Paul Karila

    Head of Discovery Services, Cellectricon
    Paul Karila

    Peter McNaughton

    Head of Pharmacology Department, Cambridge University
    Peter McNaughton

    Sigal Meilin

    Scientific Director, MD Biosciences
    Sigal Meilin

    Steve Harrison

    Vice President, Research Biology, Nektar Therapeutics
    Steve  Harrison

    Thomas Christoph

    Senior Director, Head of Pain Pharmacology, Grunenthal Gmb H
    Thomas Christoph

    Valerie Morisset

    Head of Electrophysiology, Convergence Pharmaceuticals
    Valerie Morisset

    Workshops

    Human Pain Models - Lost in Translation?
    Workshop

    Human Pain Models - Lost in Translation?

    Copthorne Tara Hotel
    22nd May 2013
    London, United Kingdom

    Copthorne Tara Hotel

    Scarsdale Place
    Kensington
    London W8 5SR
    United Kingdom

    Copthorne Tara Hotel

    The Copthorne Tara Hotel London Kensington is an elegant contemporary four-star hotel in prestigious Kensington, located just a two minutes walk from High Street Kensington underground station, making exploring easy. The hotel offers well-appointed and comfortable guest rooms combining Standard, Superior and Club accommodation. Club rooms offer iconic views over the city and include Club Lounge access for complimentary breakfast and refreshments. Guests can sample the authentic Singaporean, Malaysian and Chinese cuisine at Bugis Street, traditional pub fare at the Brasserie Restaurant & Bar or relax with a delicious drink at West8 Cocktail Lounge & Bar.

    The Copthorne Tara Hotel boasts 745 square meters of flexible meeting space, consisting of the Shannon Suite and the Liffey Suite, ideal for hosting conferences, weddings and social events. Facilities include access to the business centre 24 hours a day, fully equipped fitness room, gift shop, theatre desk and Bureau de Change. With ample onsite parking outside the London congestion charge zone and excellent transport links via Heathrow Airport, the hotel is the perfect location for business or leisure stays. The hotel is within close proximity to the shops of High Street Kensington, Knightsbridge and Westfield London, Olympia Conference Centre, Royal Albert Hall, Kensington Palace and Hyde Park.

     

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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