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The drug delivery industry is the fastest growing healthcare sector and the global market for drug delivery technologies is estimated to be worth $20 billion dollars, according to Scrip.

Novel or improved drug delivery systems can extend the product life-cycle of a drug, increase the bioavailability of new drug candidates, control the release of a drug and specifically target certain areas of the body. The impact of drug delivery systems on the drug industry is clearly immense and presents huge commercial opportunities for those in the drug delivery and pharmaceutical sector.

At this, our 5th annual event, held for the first time in the USA, drug delivery experts will discuss commercial opportunities and partnering strategies and provide delegates with best practice business models in drug delivery.

As a drug delivery executive, you will be aware of the importance and potential of this field and the commercial possibilities. Couple this with the fantastic networking opportunities offered to all our delegates and you can see this is an event not to be missed.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr M Amin Khan

Dr M Amin Khan, Director, Biopharmaceutical & Pharmaceutical R&D, Eli Lilly

9:10 DRUG DELIVERY: A MARKET OVERVIEW

J Duncan Higgons

J Duncan Higgons, Vice President, Business Development, Alkermes

  • The expanding drug delivery industry
  • The importance of drug delivery technologies
  • Commercial opportunities in drug delivery
  • Maintaining value of drugs coming off patent through drug delivery technologies
  • Combining potentially viable drugs with the right delivery technology
  • Changes and trends in drug delivery
  • 9:40 THE TRANSITION FROM DRUG DELIVERY PROVIDER TO INTEGRATED DRUG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

    Andy Francis

    Andy Francis, Vice President, Technology Strategy, SkyePharma

  • Limitations to the classic drug delivery business model
  • Strategies to broaden the range of technologies and services
  • The added value of keeping a development in-house
  • Choosing the right targets
  • Rewards of the new model
  • 10:20 BUILDING A SPECIALITY PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY

    Stephen C Rowe

    Stephen C Rowe, President and Chief Executive Officer, InfiMed Therapeutics

  • Strategy: one path to success in building a speciality pharmaceutical company
  • Successful leveraging of a platform drug delivery technology for protein drugs
  • Setting product specifications as the foundation for success and managing the R&D process
  • Optimising efficacy based upon preclinical models
  • Building upon past models of success, creating inflection points in value
  • Building a product pipeline for partnering and self development
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ORAL DELIVERY OF MACROMOLECULES IS A REALITY

    Lewis Bender

    Lewis Bender, Senior Vice President, Business Development, Emisphere Technologies

  • The five important criteria that are needed to create oral pharmaceutical macromolecule products
  • Historical problems with oral delivery of proteins and peptides
  • Benefits of finding an oral formulation
  • The oral delivery technology explained
  • Case study – Oral Heparin, and oral delivery of proteins
  • Reducing the risk to pharmaceutical companies – a successful business model
  • 12:00 LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT AND PIPELINE EXTENSION

    Dr Hing Kin Chan

    Dr Hing Kin Chan, Director, Business Development, Eurand International

  • Common problems of oral drug absorption
  • Therapeutic efficacy as a pre-requisite to successful drug development
  • Challenges in developing oral dosage forms
  • Demonstrating the benefits of bioavailability enhancement
  • How innovative delivery can enhance performance and create opportunities
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 EVALUATING POTENTIAL DRUG DELIVERY PARTNERS

    Dr Jean M Surian

    Dr Jean M Surian, Senior Formulation Research Pharmacist, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals

  • The changing perception of drug delivery within the pharmaceutical industry
  • Importance of complementing existing drug development processes within the pharmaceutical company
  • Sharing ideals: working together effectively
  • The value of flexibility in drug delivery partners
  • Long term vs short term associations: partnering with one large drug delivery company for many technologies vs. many partnerships based on technology expertise
  • 14:20 COMPETITION AND THE VALUE OF DRUG DELIVERY

    Dr Richard Vickers

    Dr Richard Vickers, Vice President, Commercial Licensing, , Élan Pharmaceutical Technologies

  • The character of competition in the pharmaceutical market
  • Problems with minimal clinical and label differentiation
  • The challenge to differentiate products
  • Enhancing or extending competitiveness of products through alternative and innovative approaches to drug delivery
  • Developing dosage forms to add value
  • Differentiating the product in a crowded market
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 DELIVERING THE PERFORMANCE THE MARKET AND PARTNERS EXPECT

    Dr Thomas Unger

    Dr Thomas Unger, , Managing Consultant, Life Sciences & Technology Practice, PA Consulting Group

  • It's all in the planning
  • Staying on track: managing projects and programs
  • Using information flow to your advantage - managing projects and securing prospective partners
  • Selecting the most commercially viable candidates to take forward
  • 16:30 PARTNERING EARLY IN DRUG DELIVERY DEVICE DEVELOPMENT

    Brien Johnson

    Brien Johnson, Vice President, Development & Industrialisation, Bespak

  • Why partner early?
  • Issues that cause time-to-market delays
  • Planning the process
  • What makes a project team effective?
  • Keys to success in drug delivery system development
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Networking Drinks Reception

    8:30 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Queenie Jang

    Queenie Jang, Vice President, Corporate Development, ConjuChem

    9:10 WHAT EXACTLY IS A COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY?

    Dr John M Siebert

    Dr John M Siebert, President and Chief Executive Officer, CIMA Labs

  • No opportunity ever wears a sign “I’m exploitable”
  • Technology is the key, but it’s not always obvious
  • Replace Murphy with Christenson
  • Commercial means manufacturing
  • It must all make $ sense
  • 9:40 DELIVERY OF DRUGS BY INHALATION: IMPROVING TIME TO COMMERCIALISATION

    David Crockford

    David Crockford, Vice President, Corporate Development & Scientific Affairs, Profile Therapeutics

  • Targeting the lungs
  • Aerosol delivery systems -emitted, inhaled and deposited
  • Adaptive aerosol delivery
  • Bridging the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies
  • Data collection by patient logging/prodose™ system
  • Keeping the end in mind
  • 10:20 CHALLENGING THE NOTION OF DRUG DELIVERY

    Dr Paul Ashton

    Dr Paul Ashton, President and Chief Executive Officer, Control Delivery Systems

  • Maximising use of flexible technology platforms
  • Using implantable devices to overcome compliance and dosing irregularity
  • Successful cost/benefit approaches to drug delivery
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 DRUG DELIVERY: ENABLING NOT DISABLING

    Dr Woody Bryan

    Dr Woody Bryan, Senior Director, Business Development, Shire Laboratories

  • Use a predictive model to understand the molecule as relates to desired in vivo performance
  • Access to a diverse portfolio of proven and patented technologies is key
  • Does your drug delivery partner have the resources to get the job done?
  • Is your partner truly focused on your project?
  • Will your partner be around when the chips are down?
  • 12:00 DERMAL POWDER PROTEIN AND PEPTIDE DELIVERY

    Jon Watts

    Jon Watts, Business Development Director, Powderject Pharmaceuticals

  • Conventional vaccines in new drug delivery routes
  • Finding success with DNA vaccines
  • Benefits of targeting the immune competent epidermis
  • Highlighting the different approaches to powder delivery of vaccines, peptides and proteins
  • Case study: experiences of in house development and partnered programmes
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 MAXIMISING THE VALUE OF DRUG DELIVERY PLATFORMS

    Dr Larry Brown

    Dr Larry Brown, Executive Director of Scientific Affairs, Epic Therapeutics

  • Review of drug delivery technologies
  • Classic vs. new model of drug delivery technology
  • Challenges for drug delivery technologies
  • ProMaxx™ as an example of a flexible drug delivery release technology
  • Opportunities for next generation formulations
  • 14:20 DELIVERY SYSTEMS FOR MEDICINES OF THE NEW GENERATION

    Dr Catherine Lucas

    Dr Catherine Lucas, Vice President, Implant Unit, ALZA

  • Proteins, peptides and genes: the new generation of medicines
  • Problems with delivery of macromolecules: oral vs. injection
  • Macromolecule therapeutics and the drug delivery challenge
  • Developing innovative delivery systems for macromolecules
  • Increasing the scope of the business
  • Long term business goals in macromolecule therapeutics
  • 15:00 LIPOSOMAL GENE THERAPY

    James Hussey

    James Hussey, President and Chief Executive Officer, Neopharm

  • Liposomes and gene drug delivery
  • Are liposomes alternatives to viral vectors?
  • What limitations do liposomes have vis-à-vis gene therapy?
  • Neopharm’s experiences using liposomes for gene therapy delivery
  • Commercial implications of liposomal gene therapy
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 OPPORTUNITIES IN DNA DELIVERY

    Dr Martin Emanuele

    Dr Martin Emanuele, Vice President, Research & Business Development, CytRx

  • Overview of non-viral DNA delivery systems
  • Applications in DNA vaccines and gene therapy
  • Safety and efficacy considerations
  • The market for DNA vaccines and delivery systems
  • Strategy for commercialising DNA vaccine delivery systems: case study of Poloxamer based systems
  • 16:30 THE FOREIGN BODY RESPONSE TO BIO-ERODIBLE SUBCUTANEOUS IMPLANTS

    Robert J Leonard

    Robert J Leonard, Vice President, Apollo BioPharmaceuticals

  • Histopathology of explants from 3-13 months post-implantation
  • Light microscopy
  • Scanning electron microscopy
  • Lymphatics
  • Macrophage / foam cell transport
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Adding Value through drug delivery systems
    Workshop

    Adding Value through drug delivery systems

    The Colonnade
    15th June 2001
    Boston, USA

    The Colonnade

    .
    Boston
    USA

    The Colonnade

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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