Home
overview
The new therapeutic agents emerging for the treatment of acute and chronic pain are revolutionising the treatment of pain sufferers across the globe. Not only has there been an explosion in the number of drugs available within this field, even better, these novel analgesics promise minimal side effects.

With this knowledge in mind, our challenge at SMi was to assemble key industry peers involved in analgesic research that would provide pertinent and up-to-date information on the key innovations within this exciting research field. As you can see from this brochure we have more than achieved our goal.

Why should you attend this event?

This is your unique opportunity to meet senior industry executives and seek their advice and opinions. This, our 2nd Pain Drugs event, promises to be as successful as the first and will highlight key issues including the challenges associated with the development of neuropathic therapies, aminal models in pain research, NO-releasing analgesics, novel drug delivery options, regulatory issues and the use of cannabinoids in pain relief. With highly acclaimed industry leaders delivering these timely presentations this is indeed an excellent opportunity for lively discussion on the new paths emerging within pain research.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks Prof Praveen Anand, Professor, Clinical Neurology & Head, Peripheral Neuropathy Unit, Imperial College School of Medicine

9:10 STRATEGIC OVERVIEW OF THE GLOBAL PAIN DRUG MARKET

Dr William Sietsema

Dr William Sietsema, Senior Director, Clinical Research, Skeletal Disease &, Kendle International

  •  Structure of the world-wide analgesia market
  •  Current pain drugs, therapeutic modalities, and pipeline analysis
  •  Identifying the deficiencies in current pain management
  •  New drug targets for pain relief
  •  Trial design pitfalls and reducing measurement bias
  • 9:40 FROM GENES TO PAIN THERAPEUTICS

    Laszlo Urban

    Laszlo Urban, Deputy Unit Head, Novartis

  •  The basic mechanisms of pain and how this information can be used to devise rational pain medicines
  •  Identification of targets: too many targets too little time?
  •  Target identification vs target validation
  •  Value and limitation of animals: don’t forget the patient!!
  •  From target to patentable ligand-reverse pharmacology
  •  Diagnostics and molecular medicine – the way forward?
  • 10:20 CHALLENGES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPIES FOR NEUROPATHIC PAIN

    Dr Robert Allen

    Dr Robert Allen, Vice President Global R&D, AstraZeneca

  •  Heterogeneity of a syndrome: global hurdles
  •  Animal models: lessons from our furry friends
  •  A mechanistic based approach: clinical perspectives
  •  Clinically meaningful relief: room for improvement
  •  Regulatory issues: in search of harmony
  •  Expanding opportunities: the future is now
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ANIMAL MODELS: TRANSGENIC MICE FOR PAIN RESEARCH

    Dr Ray Hill

    Dr Ray Hill, Executive Director, Pharmacology, Merck Sharp and Dohme

  • „h Elucidating gene function in an intact organism: relevance and implications for drug discovery and development
  • „h Advantages of this approach
  • „h Target validation
  • „h Provision of disease models
  • „h Functional analysis of novel genes „h Recent methodologies
  • „h Inducible and conditional knockouts „h Limitation of transgenics in pain research
  • 12:00 NO-RELEASING ANALGESICS: A NOVEL CLASS OF VERY EFFECTIVE AND SAFE COMPOUNDS

    Dr Piero Del Soldato

    Dr Piero Del Soldato, Executive Vice President Science & Technology, NicOx

  •  A novel class of NO-releasing analgesics has recently been described which exert remarkable pharmacological activities but produce significantly less gastrointestinal and renal toxicity than native drugs
  •  The rationale of the project is based upon the multiple pharmacological and cytoprotective activities of NO, that is released in a limited and controlled way via an enzymatic mechanism
  •  The pharmacological profile of NCX 4016 and NCX 701
  •  In conclusion, NO-releasing drugs have better efficacy and safety that the native agents and warrant further investigations in animals and humans
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS (NNRS)

    Dr James Sullivan

    Dr James Sullivan, Divisional Vice President, Neurological & Urological, Abbott

  •  Rationale for NNRs as a molecular target for pain
  •  Epibatidine, a non-opioid, non-NSAID analgesic agent - strengths and limitations
  •  Preclinical pharmacology of ABT-594
  •  Towards a mechanistic understanding of the analgesic effects of NNR compounds across different pain states
  •  Potential impact of ABT-594 on pain management
  • 14:40 NERVE TARGETED PHARMACEUTICALS AND NEUROPATHIC PAIN

    Dr Garth Whiteside

    Dr Garth Whiteside, Senior Research Scientist, SynGenix

  •  Axonal transport of compounds versus systemic delivery; anatomical and chemical targeting
  •  Tracer studies following injection into peripheral tissue
  •  Tripartite molecules for amplification
  •  Axonally delivered Gabapentin is effective in animal models of neuropathic pain
  •  Further potential of axonal transport; brain delivery, peptides, proteins and nucleic acid
  • 14:40 NEURONAL PLASTICITY AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF CHRONIC PAIN STATES

    Dr Chas Bountra

    Dr Chas Bountra, Head, Pain Research, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Heterogeneity of chronic somatic and visceral pain
  • Underlying pathological mechanisms
  • Role of sodium channels, adenosine receptors and inducible nitric oxide synthase
  • Challenges in drug discovery
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    16:20 EXCITATORY AMINO ACID RECEPTORS AND CHRONIC PAIN

    Dr Fabio Bordi

    Dr Fabio Bordi, Senior Scientist, Biology Department, GlaxoSmithKline

  •  The role of NMDA receptors in chronic pain states
  •  Intervening the NMDA pathway
  •  GV-196771: anti-hyperalgesic and anti-allodynic profile
  •  Side effects profile and reduction of morphine-induced tolerance
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 DRINKS RECEPTION

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr William K. Schmidt

    Dr William K. Schmidt, Vice President, Clinical Research and Development, Adolor

    9:10 MEETING THE NEEDS OF PATIENTS

    Dr Peter Evans

    Dr Peter Evans, Consultant Anaesthetist & Director, Pain Management Service, Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust

  • The relationship between, distress, pain and disability
  • Managing pain problems over time
  • The impact of medical therapies
  • Beliefs and values of drugs as judged by the patient
  • Integrating treatments into a pattern of care
  • Why do the pills fail?
  • 9:40 TREATMENT OF NEUROPATHIC PAIN WITH GABAPENTIN

    Dr Mark Versavel

    Dr Mark Versavel, Director, Global R&D CNS, Parke-Davis/Pfizer Global Research R&D

  • „h From anti-epileptic drug to neuropathic pain treatment
  • „h Effects in neuropathic pain models
  • „h Pharmacokinetics
  • „h Multiple-centre, controlled clinical studies: results
  • „h Adverse events and tolerability
  • 10:20 A NEW TREATMENT FOR BREAST PAIN

    Dr Jack Kessler

    Dr Jack Kessler, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Symbollon

  •  1 in 5 women suffer from clinical mastaglia
  •  Hormonally based therapies are inappropriate
  •  Homeopathic treatments are inadequate
  •  Novel in situ active drug delivery
  •  Published clinical studies support efficacy
  •  Symbollon’s clinical trial results confirm literature
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MODELS OF NOCICEPTION IN TRANSGENIC MICE

    Dr Sharon Bingham

    Dr Sharon Bingham, Investigator, GlaxoSmithKline

  •  What can transgenic mice tell us about nociceptive processing?
  •  Models and methodology used
  •  Early vs late stage testing
  •  Importance of mouse strain
  •  Interpretation of data based on these points
  • 12:00 CANNABINOIDS AND PAIN

    Dr Anita Holdcroft

    Dr Anita Holdcroft, Reader in Anaesthesia, Imperial College School of Medicine

  • Pain therapies in the past
  • Endogenous cannabinoids
  •  Pharmaceutical targets
  • Limitations of cannabinoid therapies
  • Clinical trials
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 CANNABIS BASED MEDICINES

    Dr Geoffrey Guy

    Dr Geoffrey Guy, Chairman, GW Pharmaceuticals

  • „h Selected cannabis strains yield defined cannabinoid ratios
  • „h Drug delivery technology optimises rate and extent of absorption
  • „h Patient titration is key
  • „h Clinical indication and pain management with cannabinoids
  • 14:20 ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS AND ACID SENSING ION CHANNELS

    Dr Henning Draheim

    Dr Henning Draheim, Project Team Leader, Boehringer Ingelheim

  • Voltage-gated channels I: TTX sensitive and resistant Na+ channels
  • Voltage-gated channels II: the Ca2 family of Ca2+ channels
  • Ligand-gated ion channels I: NMDA and non-NMDA Glutamate receptors
  • Ligand-gated ion channels II: vanilloid receptors, ASIC channels
  • 15:00 DELIVERING PERFORMANCE ENHANCED ANALGESICS

    Dr Paul Wotton

    Dr Paul Wotton, Vice President Corporate Development, Eurand

  • „h Market and clinical needs for optimised pain therapeutics
  • „h Why drug delivery matters for patients and pharmaceutical companies
  • „h The use of drug delivery technology to develop better pain products
  • „h Examples of performance enhanced approaches to pain medication
  • „h The drug delivery company¡¦s role in pain management product development
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 PEP:TRANS: A NEW APPROACH TO BRAIN DELIVERY

    Jamal Temsamani

    Jamal Temsamani, Director, Preclinical R&D, Synt:em

  • The BBB and drug delivery to the CNS: a brief overview
  • „h Pep:trans: mechanism of action
  • „h An effective solution for delivery of analgesics
  • „h Other potential applications
  • 16:30 INTRANASAL DELIVERY FOR BREAKTHROUGH PAIN

    Dr Steven Quay

    Dr Steven Quay, Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer, Nastech

  • „h Positioned to fulfil the unmet medical need for the treatment of breakthrough pain
  • „h Intranasal administration provides for direct absorption into the systemic circulation, by-passing problems that occur with oral administration
  • „h Blood plasma concentrations resemble those seen with injectable dosage forms
  • „h Rapid onset of action and painless therapy
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.