Home
overview
The recent successes of drugs based on therapeutic antibodies have made pharmaceutical companies world-wide sit up and take notice. The number of such drugs in the pipeline has been steadily increasing for the treatment of diseases including inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, and cancer. Therapeutic antibodies offer considerable advantages over conventional drugs in that they are able to be more specifically targeted, thus reducing unwanted side effects. Antibodies have been used to deliver a drug to its site of action, whilst others have been manufactured with built in therapeutic use to treat disorders directly.

The growth of this area of drug development is set to accelerate as genomics and proteomics result in the identification of novel targets and the technologies available to engineer and purify human antibodies improve. SMi has identified this as a key time to evaluate the potential of antibody therapeutics and to provide key updates on critical aspects of this industry, from engineering and manufacture to targeting and delivery and of course the successes and failures of antibody therapeutics currently in trials and beyond.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

9:10 IDENTIFYING NEW TARGETS FOR ANTIBODY THERAPEUTICS

Dr Jill Winter

Dr Jill Winter, Associate Director, Cancer Biology, Chiron

  • Distribution studies reveal unexpected leads
  • Looking for expression patterns that subgroup patients into potentially distinct therapeutic groups
  • Antibodies that act like small molecules
  • Target discovery outside the database
  • 9:40 TARGET DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC ANTIBODIES IN ONCOLOGY USING PHAGE DISPLAY

    Dr Ton Logtenberg

    Dr Ton Logtenberg, Executive Vice President & Chief Scientific Officer, Crucell

  • A phage antibody display technology-based subtractive method to identify new targets in oncology
  • Glycosylation and conformation variants of molecules detected with MAbstract
  • In vitro and in vivo target validation using antibody fragments and intact human antibodies
  • Antibodies against leukemic and solid tumours and endothelial cells associated with tumour angiogenesis
  • The human PER.C6 cell technology platform for the efficient and large-scale manufacturing of therapeutic human antibodies
  • Rapid isolation of stable, high yield antibody-producing clones without amplification
  • 10:20 ANTIBODY THERAPEUTICS FROM PHAGE AND RIBOSOME DISPLAY LIBRARIES

    Dr Celia Shorrock

    Dr Celia Shorrock, Head, Lead Optimisation, Cambridge Antibody Technology

  • Both phage display and ribosome display systems can be used effectively to isolate large numbers of sequence-diverse antibodies from naive libraries
  • Once leads have been identified the same display technology can be used to optimise the characteristics of drug candidates
  • Using case studies we will demonstrate the integration of display-based selections, high-throughput screening and secondary cell-based assays to develop therapeutic antibodies
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE n-CoDeRTM ANTIBODY SYSTEM

    Dr Eskil Soderlind

    Dr Eskil Soderlind, Director, Scientific Liaisons, BioInvent Therapeutic

  • Unique library diversity by in vivo formed complementarity determining regions (CDR:s) recombined into one single master framework
  • Optimal level of correctly folded and reactive molecules
  • Highly specific and functional human antibody fragments selected
  • High affinities and productivity levels
  • The latest results will be presented with focus on the development of therapeutic antibodies from n-CoDeRTM
  • 12:00 A NOVEL ANTIBODY-BASED TARGET VALIDATION STRATEGY

    Dr Gerald Beste

    Dr Gerald Beste, Director, Combinatorial Biology, Xerion Pharmaceuticals

  • Focus on functional proteomics for target validation
  • Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI): an efficient tool for target validation
  • Phage display as a source of binders
  • The disease-driven approach: simultaneous validation and identification of drug targets
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 A RICH SOURCE OF HUMAN ANTIBODIES FOR TARGET VALIDATION AND DRUG DEVELOPMENT

    Dr Michael Tesar

    Dr Michael Tesar, Team Leader, Research & Development, MorphoSys

  • EST technology for high throughput target validation
  • High quality antibodies for drug development
  • Rapid antibody optimisation towards pico-molar affinities
  • Generation of fully human antibodies with potent tumouricidal activity in vivo
  • ·HuCALâ GOLD: the next generation of HuCALâ libraries
  • 14:20 HIGH-THROUGHPUT PROTEOMICS TO DISCOVER THERAPEUTIC ANTIBODY TARGETS

    Dr Steve Holmes

    Dr Steve Holmes, Director, Therapeutic Antibody Development, Oxford GlycoSciences

  • High-throughput proteomics and integrated bioinformatics
  • Expression profiling using proteomics
  • Tumour associated cell surface proteins
  • Rapid validation of viable targets
  • Generation of human antibody therapeutics
  • 15:00 HUMANISED ANTIBODIES

    Dr Laurence Korn

    Dr Laurence Korn, Chief Executive Officer & Chairperson, Protein Design Labs

  • Humanised antibodies in autoimmune disease
  • Humanised antibodies in oncology
  • Dosing frequency and duration
  • Clinical pipeline of humanised antibodies
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 GENERATION OF HUMAN ANTIBODIES FROM HUMAN CELLS ENGRAFTED INTO SCID MICE

    Dr Phillip Morrow

    Dr Phillip Morrow, Director of Technology, Principal Scientist, Xenerex BioSciences

  • Potentially useful antibodies from human donors
  • Human monoclonal antibodies as therapies for infectious diseases
  • Strategies to create immunogenic human proteins
  • Manipulating human cells to optimise antibody responses
  • Screening and selection in an antibody generation effort
  • Strategies for identifying, isolating and preserving antigen-specific cells
  • 16:40 FURTHER REDUCING ANTIBODY IMMUNOGENICITY

    Dr Frank Carr

    Dr Frank Carr, Chief Executive Officer & Chief Scientific Officer, Biovation

  • Is immunogenicity still a problem?
  • Risk factors for immunogenicity in antibodies
  • Variable regions are foreign to the human immune system
  • Identifying and removing T cell epitopes
  • Case study: deimmunised J591
  • Creation of deimmunised biologics for long-term repeat dosage
  • 17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Dee Athwal

    Dr Dee Athwal, Senior Principal Scientist, Celltech

    9:10 SUPERANTIBODIES

    Dr Alton Morgan

    Dr Alton Morgan, President & Chief Executive Officer, InNexus

  • Site specific addition of biological properties to native antibody function
  • Increasing the strength of binding through cross-linking to target antigen
  • Increasing potency of antibodies through triggering apoptosis
  • Creating novel antibodies capable of non-cytolytic translocation across membranes into cells
  • Creating vaccines from antibodies
  • Antibody case studies; anti-CD-20, anti-HIV (gp120)
  • 9:40 BISPECIFIC T CELL ENGAGERS (BiTEs)

    Prof Patrick Baeuerle

    Prof Patrick Baeuerle, Chief Scientific Officer, Micromet

  • How to recruit and activate T cells for tumour cell elimination
  • Why T cells?
  • Previous experiences with bispecifics
  • Single-chain bispecific antibodies
  • The show case: MT103, a CD19/CD3-specific BiTE

    The holy grail: MT102 and efficacy with solid tumours

  • A first BiTE for non-cancer indications: MT107

    Building a BiTE pipeline

  • 10:20 THERAPEUTIC ANTIBODIES IN THE HIV BATTLE

    Prof Jean-Claude Chermann

    Prof Jean-Claude Chermann, Director, Research & Development, URRMA Biopharma

  • What is the present commercial availability of therapeutic antibodies against HIV?
  • Provision of a beneficial therapeutic tool to treat patients resistant to highly active antiretroviral therapy
  • Antibodies against the HIV enzyme integrase
  • Case study: anti-R7V
  • From preventative to therapeutic vaccines
  • Advantages over the current cocktail of drugs used to target the HIV virus
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 DELIVERY SYSTEMS FOR ANTIBODY THERAPEUTICS

    Dr Toby King

    Dr Toby King, Director, Research & Development, Weston Medical Group

  • How can we deliver antibodies?
  • The alternatives to needles
  • The challenges of reformulation
  • How do we keep the molecules intact?
  • Can we meet the needs of the patient, doctor and pharmaco?
  • 12:00 ANTIBODIES TO MODULATE TUMOUR IMMUNITY

    Dr Birgit Schultes

    Dr Birgit Schultes, Vice President, Research, AltaRex

  • Processing of tumour antigens and immune complexes thereof by dendritic cells: examples CA125, MUC1, PSA
  • T helper and cytolytic T cell activation by dendritic cells presenting antigen-antibody complexes
  • Monitoring of T cell responses in OvaRexâ treated ovarian cancer patients by ELISPOT
  • Clinical experience with lose-dose murine antibody OvaRexâ MAb-B43, 13 as adjunct therapy and in recurrent disease
  • Combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES FOR THERAPEUTIC ANTIBODIES

    Richard Francis

    Richard Francis, Director, Purification Development, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Process development strategies and approaches for antibody therapeutic products
  • Generic process applications and cycle time reduction
  • The problems posed by production capacity
  • Improving purification steps in the production process
  • Alternative systems to increase speed and reduce costs of human antibody production
  • Regulatory considerations relating to protein purification
  • 14:40 ENGINEERING HUMAN ANTIBODIES FOR TREATMENT OF DISEASE

    Dr Dee Athwal

    Dr Dee Athwal, Senior Principal Scientist, Celltech

  • Re-engineering: less mouse, more human
  • Developments in recombinant DNA technologies
  • Molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) for engineering synthetic antibodies
  • Antibody engineering with target-activated enzymes
  • Augmented activity with CpG
  • Scaling up manufacture for commercial use
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES IN CORN SEED

    Dr Jonathan McIntyre

    Dr Jonathan McIntyre, Chief Scientist, Monsanto Protein Technologies, Monsanto

  • Intellectual property in the plant transgenic industry
  • Role of post-translational modification on product opportunities
  • Potential for improved capacity and cost of goods relative to bioreactors
  • Stewardship and containment
  • Regulatory, quality assurance and safety requirements
  • The importance of analytical methodology
  • 16:20 PRODUCTION OF THERAPEUTIC ANTIBODY FRAGMENTS

    Dr Andrew Chapman

    Dr Andrew Chapman, Head, Bioprocess Research,

  • Antibody production systems: advantages and disadvantages
  • Microbial expression of antibody fragments
  • Efficient, low cost purification of antibody fragments
  • PEGylation of Fab’ fragments to improve half-life
  • Clinical experience with PEGylated antibody fragments
  • Use of Fab’ as a flexible binding unit
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Isolation and Validation of Therapeutic Antibodies
    Workshop

    Isolation and Validation of Therapeutic Antibodies

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    19th June 2002
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.