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More than 160 million people in the US suffer from some form of chronic pain and the number will likely increase with ageing populations more prone to both chronic and acute pain. The market for pain therapeutics is expected to grow at an annual rate of 10% worldwide from 2003 to 2008.

SMi’s 5th annual event will bring together experts in the field to take a look at the latest developments in treating chronic and acute pain, analysing some of the recent trial data and evaluating drugs in the pipeline, as well as assessing the potential of unmet clinical needs. The Conference will discuss some of the difficulties of in vivo pharmacology, handling the experimental/clinical interaction and possible improvements for clinical trial design, monitoring and assessment techniques.

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:

Dr Chas Bountra, Vice President & Head of Biology, Neurology & Gastrointestinal CEDD, GlaxoSmithKline
Dr Theo Meert, Research Fellow, Head of Department, CNS – Pain & Alzheimer’s, Johnson & Johnson
Dr Joseph Frey, Director, Experimental Medicine, AstraZeneca
Dr Kathryn Rogers, Director, Wyeth
Dr Ross Kinloch, Associate Research Fellow, Pain Therapeutics, Pfizer
Dr Susan Boyce, Project Director, Senior Research Fellow, Merck Sharp & Dohme
Prof Lars Arendt-Nielsen, Professor & Chairman, Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction, Laboratory for Experimental Human Pain Research, Aalborg University
Dr Peter McIntyre, Lab Head/Head of Exploratory Pain Projects, Novartis
Ella Magal,, Associate Director, Research, Amgen
Dr Katharine Walker, Director, Neuropharmacology, Purdue Pharma
Patricia Salvati, Vice President, Discovery Research,Newron Pharmaceuticals

Benefits of attending:
DRUG DISCOVERY: Find out about integrating science and technology and discuss the challenges associated with the discovery of novel analgesics
PAIN TARGETS: Evaluate novel methods to identify and validate new targets
EXPERIMENTAL MODELS: Investigate how models can be used to predict the outcome of clinical trials
IMAGING: Learn about strategies for use of functional imaging in drug discovery and development
CHRONIC PAIN: Listen to recent advances and approaches to the management of chronic pain
NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES: Meet with leading experts and learn from their experiences

“An excellent opportunity to interact with pain experts from industry and academia in enlightened discussions on the prospects and pitfalls of pain therapeutics research and development.”
Dr Peter McIntyre, Lab Head/Head of Exploratory Pain Projects, Novartis

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Peter McIntyre

Dr Peter McIntyre, Laboratory Head/Program Team Head, Novartis

9:10 CHALLENGES ASSOCIATED WITH THE DISCOVERY OF NOVEL ANALGESICS

Dr Chas Bountra

Dr Chas Bountra, Vice President & Head of Biology, Neurology & Gastrointestinal CEDD, GlaxoSmithKline

  • How do we identify fundamentally important targets as opposed to disease correlates?
  • Utility of knock outs/antisense
  • Predictive utility of animal models
  • Patient heterogeneity
  • 9:40 DRUG DISCOVERY FOR PAIN THERAPEUTICS

    Dr Inmaculada Silos-Santiago

    Dr Inmaculada Silos-Santiago, Director, Pharmacology, Vertex Pharmaceuticals

  • Strategies for membrane targets in pain drug discovery
  • Novel approach to selectivity assays
  • High-throughput assays for compound advancement
  • Coupling rapid chemistry with in vivo pharmacology
  • 10:20 TARGET IDENTIFICATION

    Dr Ross Kinloch

    Dr Ross Kinloch, Associate Research Fellow, Pain Therapeutics, Pfizer

  • Why search for new targets?
  • Identifying novel targets for the treatment of pain
  • What might the targets of the future be?
  • Ca2+ channels as potential targets
  • Proposed mechanism of action of pregabalin
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 WHY PAIN MODELS ARE A NEED TO HAVE RATHER THAN A NICE TO HAVE

    John Connell

    John Connell, Head of Clinical Pharmaco Dynamics, Medeval

    12:00 THE USE OF HUMAN EXPERIMENTAL PAIN MODELS IN DRUG SCREENING

    Prof Lars Arendt-Nielsen

    Prof Lars Arendt-Nielsen, Professor & Chairman Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction, Laboratory for Experimental Human Pain Research, Aalborg University

  • New models for assessing pain from skin, muscles and viscera
  • Human experimental models of central sensitisation evoked from skin, muscles and viscera
  • Differentiated effects of drugs on pain evoked from skin, muscles and viscera
  • Correlation between pain assessment parameters and pharmacokinetic data
  • Why most analgesics do not block temporal summation (wind-up)
  • New insight into advanced pain assessment techniques for test drug efficacies
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 IN VIVO PHARMACOLOGY

    Ella Magal

    Ella Magal, Associate Director, Research, Amgen

  • How effective are animal models at predicting efficacy in humans?
  • Difficulties in assessing pain in animals
  • Biochemical challenge paradigms
  • Pharmacodynamics in animal models
  • 14:40 NEW APPROACHES TO INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROPATHIC PAIN

    Dr Susan Boyce

    Dr Susan Boyce, Project Director, Senior Research Fellow, Merck Sharp & Dohme

  • Role of B1 receptors in pain and inflammation
  • Contribution of spinal B1 recptors to antinociception
  • Generation and characterisation of a human bradykin receptor B1 transgenic rat
  • Development of potent non-peptide B1 receptor antagonists
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 VOLTAGE GATED ION CHANNELS AND PAIN

    Patricia Salvati

    Patricia Salvati, Vice President, Discovery Research, Newron Pharmaceuticals

  • Role of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels in inflammatory and neuropathic pain
  • Structure, distribution and function of sodium and N-type calcium channels
  • New functional high-throughput assays in ion channel drug discovery
  • Sodium and calcium channel blockers in pain management
  • 16:20 VRI ANTAGONISTS

    Dr Jenny Longmore

    Dr Jenny Longmore, from, NeuroKnowledge
    View Bio

  • Ways to demonstrate the existence of specific vanilloid receptors
  • The importance of developing a better understanding of genetic disorders
  • Molecular and functional characterisation of vanilloid receptors
  • The key role of receptors in pain therapeutics
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Keith Foster

    Dr Keith Foster, General Project Manager, Health Protection Agency

    9:10 TACHYKININS AND OPIOIDS

    Dr Theo Meert

    Dr Theo Meert, Research Fellow, Head of Department, CNS – Pain & Alzheimer’s, Johnson & Johnson

  • Role of NK in pain
  • Role of opioids in pain
  • Adding NK to opioids in terms of efficacy
  • Role of Nk1 on opioid side-effects
  • 9:40 ANALGESIC POTENTIAL OF CLOSTRIDIAL NEUROTOXIN DERIVATIVES

    Dr Keith Foster

    Dr Keith Foster, General Project Manager, Health Protection Agency

  • Botulinum neurotoxin type A has been demonstrated to have analgesic properties
  • Botulinum neurotoxins inhibit neurotransmitter release from nociceptive neurons
  • Effects of neurotoxins are sustained for several weeks/months
  • Novel molecules based upon the neurotoxins have been engineered with improved selectivity for nociceptors
  • These neurotoxin derived molecules display prolonged analgesic activity in chronic pain models
  • Novel agents based on neurotoxins have the potential to be long acting analgesics effective in chronic pain
  • 10:20 CANNABINOID RECEPTOR AGONISTS

    Dr Alyson Fox

    Dr Alyson Fox, Head of Biology, Novartis

  • Cannabinoids in chronic pain in animals and man
  • Can analgesia and side-effects be separated?
  • Distribution of cannabinoid receptors
  • Inhibitory activity of peripheral CB receptors on sensory nerves
  • Role of CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists in chronic pain
  • Peripheralised CB receptor agonists: increasing the therapeutic window
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PERZINFOTEL

    Dr Kathryn Rogers

    Dr Kathryn Rogers, Director, Wyeth

  • Overview of current mechanism of NMDA antagonists in pain inhibition
  • Pharmacology of Perzinfotel
  • Perzinfotel and animal models of chronic pain
  • Clinical experience with Perzinfotel
  • 12:00 TRP THERMO-RECEPTORS IN CLINICAL PAIN AND HYPERSENSITIVITY

    Prof Praveen Anand

    Prof Praveen Anand, Professor, Clinical Neurology, Imperial College London

  • TRPV1 (capsaicin receptor), TRPV3, 4, TRPM8 (menthol receptor), ANKTM1 in disease states
  • Differentiating TRPV1 neurotoxin agonist (capsaicin, RTX) effects from TRPV1 antagonism
  • Preclinical therapeutic indications for TRPV1 antagonists and TRPM8 agonists
  • Selection of patients and validation of end-points for TRP-targeted clinical trials
  • CHEPS for patient selection as an objective measure of heat-evoked pain
  • Demonstration of CHEPS selective A-Delta/C fibre stimulation with EEG potentials and fMRI results
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 CHRONIC PAIN ASSOCIATED WITH BONE-RELATED DISEASE

    Dr Katharine Walker

    Dr Katharine Walker, Director, Neuropharmacology, Purdue Pharma

  • Market overview
  • Recent advances in models of bone cancer pain
  • New models of chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis
  • Opportunities and recent advances in drug discovery for chronic pain and bone-related disease
  • 14:40 TOPICAL APPROACHES TO THE MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PAIN

    Dr Keith Bley

    Dr Keith Bley, Senior Vice President, Nonclinical Research & Development, NeurogesX

  • Hyperactive cutaneous nociceptors drive many pain syndromes
  • Evidenced by efficacy of topical local anaesthetics
  • TRPV1 agonists can inactive nociceptors
  • Single high-concentration exposures provide persistent efficacy
  • Topical TRPV1 agonist formulations display favourable therapeutic index
  • Capsaicin-based product in advanced clinical evaluation
  • 15:20 THE INTRANASAL ROUTE

    Dr Tony Fisher

    Dr Tony Fisher, Director, Clinical Trials, West Pharmaceuticals

  • Introduction
  • Alternative routes of drug delivery, the nasal route
    Physiology of the human nasal cavity
  • Barriers and strategies to include effect of ‘pathology’ eg rhinitis
  • Utility of the nasal route for local and systemic delivery
  • Developmental aspects to include formulation, device, animal (species differences in the use of the sheep) and distribution studies
    Nasal delivery pain therapeutics, outline review
  • West case studies, focus on breakthrough pain, morphine, fentanyl
    Conclusions
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Negotiating Pitfalls in the Preclinical Development of Novel Analgesics
    Workshop

    Negotiating Pitfalls in the Preclinical Development of Novel Analgesics

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    11th June 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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