Home
overview

Following a series of well received conferences, SMi are delighted to announce their 7th annual event on Pain Therapeutics. In recent years the pain therapeutics market has been growing extensively with the overall value now reaching over $23 billion.

This conference will address key issues surrounding the market, such as the extensive regulatory concerns, abuse and addiction to prescription opioid medication and compare and contrast the use of human and animal pain models and how to best maximise their use.

Industry experts, from key companies including AstraZeneca, Wyeth, Abbott and Merck, will discuss drug classes such as the breakthrough of TRP-V1, CB2 and chemokines. Consideration will also be given to translational pharmacology in pain, how it affects the market and why it is vital to link research and development. Network with an international audience and leading speakers as they discuss the unmet needs and clinical advances in drugs used to combat pain.

A must attend event for those working in the highly competitive field of pain therapeutics!

Hear contributions from leading industry experts, including:

- Prof Chas Bountra, Vice President & Head of Biology, GlaxoSmithKline
- Dr Wilson Compton, Director, Division of Epidemiology, Services & Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
- Dr Boris Chizh, Director, Exploratory Pain Medicine, GlaxoSmithKline
- Dr Kathryn Rogers, Director, Neuroscience Research, Wyeth Research
- Prof Irene Tracey, Director, FMRIB Centre & Pain Imaging Neuroscience Group, Oxford University
- Dr Catherine Abbadie, Research Fellow, Merck
- Dr Arthur Gomtsyan, Associate Research Fellow, Abbott
- Dr Uri Herzberg, Principal Scientist, Johnson & Johnson
- Dr Alf Claesson, Principal Scientist, AstraZeneca
- Dr Garth Whiteside, Principal Research Scientist I, Wyeth Research

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Chas Bountra

Chas Bountra, Vice President & Head, Biology, GlaxoSmithKline

9:10 ASSESSING THE PAIN THERAPEUTICS MARKET

  • How has the market changed over the past few years?
  • Current and future approaches to the management of pain
  • Tools and methods used in the treatment of pain
  • Success and failures
  • Recent and future patent expirations for key drugs
  • Areas of pain management requiring further investment
  • New models for assessing pain – examples of how to implement them
  • Mitchell Brin

    Mitchell Brin, Senior Vice President, Development Therapeutic Area Head, Botox & Neurology, Allergan

    Klaus Dembowsky

    Klaus Dembowsky, Vice President, Drug Discovery, Ingenium Pharmaceuticals

    9:50 REGULATORY ISSUES

    Horst Kastrup

    Horst Kastrup, Head, Worldwide Drug Regulatory Affairs, Viatris G M B H & Co K G

  • The potential misuse of narcotic drugs and how regulations handle this
  • The effect of regulatory reviews on markets for pain products
  • Pain relief as a legal right
  • How has the William Hurwitz case affected pain therapeutics?
  • WHO narcotic drug policies: How do regulations differ between selected countries?
  • Effects of regulations for narcotic drugs on the development phase of new products
  • Actual guidelines for the development of pain drugs
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 ABUSE AND ADDICTION TO PRESCRIPTION OPIOID MEDICATION

    Wilson Compton

    Wilson Compton, Director, Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health (NIH)

  • Abuse of prescription opioids has increased markedly in the United States
  • The relationship of pain to abuse of and addiction to opioids is complex
  • The need for effective but less abusable agents is acute
  • Information is needed on the risk factors predicting problematic use of opioids
  • 11:30 IMAGING PAIN

    Irene Tracey

    Irene Tracey, Director of FMRIB Centre & Pain Imaging Neuroscience Group, Oxford University

  • Why image the brain during pain?
  • Some neuropathic pain states produce reduced thalamic activity – how can this be monitored?
  • Functional brain imaging in the comparison of neural activation patterns related to cutaneous, musculoskeletal, visceral and neuropathic pain
  • Some neuropathic pain states produce reduced thalamic activity, whereas allodynia in central nervous system pain leads to activation of cortical areas – how can these be distinguished by imaging?
  • At the present time functional pain imaging alone cannot be used to diagnose pain conditions or determine the effectiveness of analgesic treatments – will this ever be possible?
  • The future of imaging for the treatment of pain
  • 12:10 POST SURGICAL PAIN

    Uri Herzberg

    Uri Herzberg, Prinicpal Scientist, Johnson & Johnson

  • The unmet needs from the vantage points of the:
  • Healthcare system
  • Surgeon
  • Patient
  • What are we learning from animal models?
  • Current treatment approaches
  • Emerging approaches and technologies
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:20 ANIMAL MODELS

    Kathryn Rogers

    Kathryn Rogers, Director, Neuroscience Research, Wyeth

  • Utility of current animal models
  • How to make animal disease relevant pain models
  • Difficulties in assessing pain in animals
  • How effective are current animal models?
  • How can animal pain models be improved?
  • Animal models in development
  • 15:00 HUMAN PAIN MODELS AND HOW TO MAXIMISE THEIR VALUE

    Boris Chizh

    Boris Chizh, Director, Exploratory Pain Medicine, GlaxoSmithKline

  • What are the benefits of using a human pain model rather than an animal model?
  • What can be learned from clinical trials? How to avoid and overcome problems
  • How to increase the success of Phase II clinical trials
  • Target validation and novel pain targets in human chronic states
  • What is the future for this way of testing pain therapeutics?
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 TRANSLATIONAL PHARMACOLOGY IN PAIN

    Chas Bountra

    Chas Bountra, Vice President & Head, Biology, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Why is translational pharmacology required?
  • The importance of acknowledging translational pharmacology and its uses in developing pain therapeutics
  • How to simulate long-term drug-patient dynamic interactions
  • The movement from animal and human studies to treatment and therapeutics
  • 16:40 LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT NGF ANTAGONISTS FOR THE TREATMENT OF PAIN

    Kazimierz Babinski

    Kazimierz Babinski, Vice President, Drug Development, PainCeptor

  • Overview of NGF’s role in peripheral sensitization and pain
  • Identification of LMW compounds that inhibit NGF activity
  • In vitro profiling of lead compound series as NGF antagonists
  • In vivo efficacy in animal models of acute and chronic pain
  • Therapeutic potential and implications for the treatment of neuropathic pain
  • 17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Wilson Compton

    Wilson Compton, Director, Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health (NIH)

    9:10 MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO PAIN THERAPEUTICS

    Alf Claesson

    Alf Claesson, Principal Scientist, AstraZeneca R&D

  • Shortcomings of current therapeutics
  • Review of druggable mechanisms
  • Current work on these mechanisms
  • Prospects for future analgesics
  • 9:50 THE USE OF TRANSGENIC MICE AS A STRATEGY FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW PAIN TARGETS

    Malcolm Sheardown

    Malcolm Sheardown, Head, CNS Therapy Area, Paradigm Therapeutics

  • Why do we need novel drug targets?
  • A strategy for rapid and efficient production of transgenic mice
  • The importance of thorough phenotype analysis
  • The validation of potential new pain targets
  • What is the future for this type of approach?
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE THERAPEUTICS POTENTIAL OF CB2 AGONISTS IN TREATING CHRONIC PAIN STATES

    Garth Whiteside

    Garth Whiteside, Principal Research Scientist I, Wyeth Research

  • A role for CB2 receptors in chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain states
  • Proof-of-concept studies with a prototypic agonist
  • On target efficacy and off target side effects
  • Involvement of the opioidergic system
  • 11:40 TRPV1 AGONIST-BASED APPROACHES TO THE MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PAIN SYNDROMES

    Keith Bley

    Keith Bley, Senior Vice President, Nonclinical R & D, NeurogesX

  • Exposure to TRPV1 agonists can defunctionalise nociceptive nerve fibres for extended periods
  • Defunctionalisation of nociceptive nerves can be restricted to target tissues
  • TRPV1 agonists such as capsaicin are highly selective and have low toxicological potential
  • Data from clinical trials suggests efficacy can be achieved without significant adverse events
  • 12:30 IN SEARCH OF NOVEL TRPV1 ANTAGONISTS FOR PAIN MANAGEMENT

    Neelima Khairatkar-Joshi

    Neelima Khairatkar-Joshi, General Manager, Glenmark Research Centre

  • TRPV1 receptor activation and pain signalling
  • TRPV1 receptor antagonist hits through screening
  • In vitro proof on concept – potent, selective and multimodal blockage of TRPV1 receptor activation by selected hits
  • Separation of chiral isomers
  • Efficacy profile of chiral isomers in various animal models for pain and safety pharmacology
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:50 VANILLOID RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS FOR PAIN

    Arthur  Gomtsyan

    Arthur Gomtsyan, Associate Research Fellow, Abbott Laboratories

  • From high-throughput screening hits to potent and selective TRPV1 antagonists
  • TRPV1 antagonists block channel activation by vanilloids, heat and acid
  • TRPV1 antagonists relieve pathophisiological pain in animal models
  • Effect of chirality on in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of TRPV1 antagonists
  • Utilisation of variety of approaches for installation of a chiral centre in TRPV1 antagonists
  • 14:30 CHEMOKINES AND PAIN

    Catherine Abbadie

    Catherine Abbadie, Research Fellow, Merck

  • Role of inflammatory responses in the development of neuropathic pain
  • Role of neuron-microglial communications in neuropathic pain establishment and maintenance
  • Cross-talk between chemokine and other GPCR’s
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 VOLTAGE GATED SODIUM CHANNEL INHIBITORS FOR THE TREATMENT OF NEUROPATHIC PAIN

    Jan  Smith

    Jan Smith, Director, Theravance

  • Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSC) and pain
  • Multivalent ligand design
  • Na+ channels and application of multivalent ligand design
  • Lidocaine dimers – in vitro VGSC profile
  • Evidence for a multivalent interaction at VGSCs
  • 16:20 THE IMPACT OF TRIPTANS ON MIGRAINE RESEARCH

    Jenny Longmore

    Jenny Longmore, Freelance Consultant, NeuroKnowledge

  • How have triptans unlocked migraine research?
  • How studying triptan pharmacological mechanisms has led to mechanistically related targets
  • Prophylaxis – a neglected research area
  • The impact of migraine genetics on drug discovery
  • The prospective of personalised migraine therapies
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    +

    Workshops

    The Critical Path for the Discovery of New Pain Therapeutics
    Workshop

    The Critical Path for the Discovery of New Pain Therapeutics

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel
    14th June 2006
    London, United Kingdom

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel

    Harrington Gardens
    London SW7 4LH
    United Kingdom

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.