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 What is this event about?

 

Ensure that you have access the information and ideas you need to overcome the challenges you face when taking a new drug from pre- to post-clinical trials

Pain affects all of us some of the time, and many of us all the time. Yet, the pharmacologic treatments available to alleviate pain have changed little in the last 50 years. Those who suffer from acute pain originating in the peripheral nervous system have the best chances of finding relief, while others suffering chronic neuropathic pain must often settle for partial or even minimal relief.

In addition the current models and theories of pain and its mechanisms have failed to yeild significantly new therapeutics over recent years.

Now in its 11th year, SMi's annual Pain Therapeutic conference series has gone from strength to strength; join our faculty of top-level speakers and address the current issues facing the clinical R&D field of pain drug development.

Interested in speaking at the conference?  

Please contact Nicholas Hares, the Producer at nhares@smi-online.co.uk to discuss the speaking opportunities available.

For event sponsorship and exhibitioning opportunities, please contact sponsorshipdept@smi-online.co.uk 

 

This conference seeks to address

  • Recent successes and failures for new drugs in development
  • Translational pain R&D
  • Current human and animal pain models
  • Pain managment methodologies
  • Pain treatment
  • Clinical trial design considerations
 

 

 

You should attend this event if you are involved in;

  • Pain clinical trials and clinical research
  • Pain Research and Development
  • Neuroscience drug discovery
  • Pain management
  • Pain Therapeutics
  • Clinical neuroscience
  • Clinical development-research
  • Drug delivery
  • Academic pain research
  • Business Development

 

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Chas Bountra

Chas Bountra, Chief Scientist, Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Oxford

9:10 EPIGENETIC PROTEINS REPRESENT BETTER THERAPEUTIC NODES FOR DISCOVERY OF NEW ANALGESICS

Chas Bountra

Chas Bountra, Chief Scientist, Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Oxford

  • What are epigenetic proteins?
  • Why are they better targets?
  • Are they tractable?
  • Will such drug candidates be safe?
  • 9:45 RECENT ADVANCES IN THE MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BASIS OF PAIN

    Peter McNaughton

    Peter McNaughton, Head of Pharmacology Department, University of Cambridge

  • Recent progress in understanding the roles of ion channels in pain will be reviewed
  • TRPV1 is potentiated by inflammation and promotes hyperalgesia
  • TRPM8 is inhibited by inflammation, and activation of TRPM8 has an analgesic action
  • HCN ion channels regulate nociceptor firing frequency and play a critical role in neuropathic pain
  • 10:20 PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR PERIPHERAL OPIOID RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST DRUG DEVELOPMENT

    Lynn Webster

    Lynn Webster, Medical Director Research, and Senior Consultant, Lifetree Clinical Research, and Omega Pain Clinic

  • Research design: important characteristics of early phase studies
  • Methodology: factors which will influence primary outcome measures
  • Outcome: possible product differentiation characteristics
  • 10:55 Morning Coffee

    11:15 ADVANCED HUMAN PAIN BIOMARKERS IN EARLY DRUG DEVELOPMENT

    Lars Arendt-Nielsen

    Lars Arendt-Nielsen, Director, Centre for Sensory-Motor Interaction, Aalborg University

    11:50 CLINICAL EXPERIENCES OF TRPV1 ANTAGONISM

    Hans Quiding

    Hans Quiding, Senior Research Scientist, AstraZeneca

  • Effects in experimental pain models
  • Effects in acute postoperative pain
  • Effects in chronic nociceptive pain
  • 12:25 Novel, potent and selective mPGES-1 inhibitors in treatment of chronic pain and inflammation

    Neelima Khairatkar Joshi

    Neelima Khairatkar Joshi, Senior Vice President, Glenmark Pharmaceutials

  • An overview of mPGES-1 target biology
  • What are the similarities and differences between NSAIDS, Coxibs and mPGES-1 inhibitors?
  • Overcoming the challenges resulting from species differences
  • Bringing GRC 27322 from screening to in vivo assessment
  • Assessment and current status of the project
  • 13:00 Networking Lunch

    14:00 A PARADIGM SHIFT: USING BRAIN MECHANISMS TO INFORM THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW THERAPIES AND CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN

    Anthony Jones

    Anthony Jones, Professor of Neuro-Rheumatology, University of Manchester

  • Key brain mechanisms of pain perception
  • New insights into mechanisms of therapy and prevention
  • Unravelling placebo analgesia
  • Taking advantage of the potential reversibility of chronic pain
  • Designing clinical trials that allow us to understand the result
  • 14:35 RECENT SUCCESSES AND FAILURES FOR NEW DRUGS IN DEVELOPMENT: THE ROLE OF ANIMAL MODELS

    Odd-Geir Berge

    Odd-Geir Berge, Senior Principal Scientist, AstraZeneca

  • Correlation between preclinical and clinical readouts
  • What do animal models model?
  • Failures and successes – Possible lessons?
  • 15:10 ANIMAL MODELS OF OSTEOARTHRITIS (OA) PAIN

    Ian Machin

    Ian Machin, Director of Pain and Sensory Disorders Research Unit, Pfizer

  • Observer bias in study outcomes
  • How predictive are animal models of OA pain?
  • Areas for improvement in the future
  • 15:45 Afternoon Tea

    16:05 TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE IN PAIN R&D

    David Walsh

    David Walsh, Director, Arthritis Research UK Pain Centre, University of Nottingham

  • Integrating basic science with clinical pain research
  • The mechanistic understanding of pain
  • Mapping preclinical models to the patient experience
  • Clinical pain research tools
  • 16:40 HUMAN TISSUES AND ANIMAL MODELS IN TARGET IDENTIFICATION AND VALIDATION

  • Correlation of target expression with clinical pain history in inflammatory and neuropathic pain
  • Functional studies in animal models
  • Alternative approaches
  • Fiona Boissonade

    Fiona Boissonade, Head of Neuroscience Research Group, The University Of Sheffield

    17:15 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Jonathan Stewart

    Jonathan Stewart, Disease Area Head, Neuroscience, Immunology and Pain, Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals Ltd

    9:10 OPIOID RECEPTORS: NEW DEVELOPMENTS WITH OLD TARGETS

    Edward Bilsky

    Edward Bilsky, Director, Centre for Excellence in the Neurosciences, University of New England COM

  • The delta opioid receptor: What’s next?
  • Mu and Kappa receptors: Novel stand alone drugs, receptor interactions and more...
  • Opioid antagonists as adjuncts for analgesic therapy
  • 9:45 EMERGING THERAPIES FOR NEUROPATHIC PAIN

    Jonathan Stewart

    Jonathan Stewart, Disease Area Head, Neuroscience, Immunology and Pain, Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals Ltd

  • High unmet medical need for new treatments with better efficacy and improved tolerability
  • Novel targets are being investigated
  • This review outlines the future competitive landscape
  • 10:20 HUMAN ABUSE LIABILITY ASSESSMENT AND DRUG REGULATION: CLINICAL PROOF OF CONCEPT STUDIES FOR ABUSE-DETERRENT FORMULATIONS

    Lynn Webster

    Lynn Webster, Medical Director Research, and Senior Consultant, Lifetree Clinical Research, and Omega Pain Clinic

  • Describe evolving FDA expectations from human abuse liability studies
  • Discuss what regulators allow in package inserts that can differentiate one product from another
  • Describe important methodology considerations in designing human abuse liability studies
  • Discuss outcome objectives and meanings of human abuse liability studies to real world abuse potential of a molecule
  • 10:55 Morning Coffee

    11:25 TAPENTADOL - A NEW STRONG CENTRALLY ACTING ANALGESIC

    Barbara Hoggart

    Barbara Hoggart, Pain Management Clinic, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust

  • MOR-NRI novel mode of action
  • Comparable efficacy but improved GI side effects compared to oxycodone
  • Significant patient outcome data
  • Where will we use it?
  • 12:00 CLINICAL TARGET VALIDATION: INCREASING HUMAN EVIDENCE AND CONFIDENCE IN SUPPORT OF TARGET SELECTION

    Aoibhinn McDonnell

    Aoibhinn McDonnell, Study Clinician, Pfizer

  • Selecting the right patients
  • Scientifically novel methodologies
  • Feasibility and practical considerationsa
  • 12:35 Networking Lunch

    13:35 EARLY PROOF OF CONCEPT TRIALS IN CHRONIC PAIN - PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Andreas Scholz

    Andreas Scholz, Clinical Expert, Grünenthal

  • Typical problems in first-in patient trials vs. needs in clinical development
  • Case study to assess analgesia in first-in patient trial in chronic neuropathic pain
  • Is there a circadian rhythm in pain intensities?
  • Placebo, still the old problem...?
  • 14:10 ‘HAS THE BLIND BEEN BROKEN?’ - A NEW METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN CLINICAL TRIALS IN PAIN

    Stephen Wright

    Stephen Wright, Director, R&D, GW Pharmaceuticals

  • What do the CONSORT guidelines suggest?
  • Results of studies using Sativex in chronic pain states
  • Factors affecting patient-reported outcomes
  • A statistical approach to investigation of the maintenance of the blind to treatment allocation
  • 14:45 LESSONS LEARNED IN DEVELOPING BIOLOGICS FOR PAIN

    David Shelton

    David Shelton, Executive Director, Rinat Laboratories, Rinat Laboratories, Pfizer

  • What are the relevant differences between biologics and small molecules?
  • How does this affect preclinical development?
  • How does this affect clinical development?
  • 15:15 Afternoon Tea

    15:35 REVIEWING END-POINTS IN CLINICAL PAIN RESEARCH

    Terry McNearney

    Terry McNearney, Senior Medical Advisor, Neuroscience and Pain, Eli Lilly

  • Impact recommendations
  • Initiative on methods measurement
  • Pain assessment in clinical trials
  • 16:10 NO SUBMISSION OF ANY NEW PAIN MEDICATION WITHOUT A PAEDIATRIC INVESTIGATION PLAN

    Klaus Rose

    Klaus Rose, Director, klausrose Consulting

  • The EU pediatric regulation in its 5th year and the preceding US pediatric legislation
  • Pain treatment in children as one key focus of the EU Pediatric Committee
  • Key features of the first EMA workshop on pediatric pain and its treatment in 2004
  • Published decisions on pediatric pain treatment on the EMA pediatric website
  • How to identify key opinion leaders in pediatric pain treatment
  • Key elements of a pediatric investigation plan (PIP) in pain treatment
  • 16:45 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

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    Workshops

    Pain Therapeutics
    Workshop

    Pain Therapeutics

    Crowne Plaza - The City
    31st May 2011
    London, United Kingdom

    Crowne Plaza - The City

    19 New Bridge Road
    London EC4V 6DB
    United Kingdom

    Crowne Plaza - The City

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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