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New technologies are propelling the potential for drug discovery into the 21st century. We ask you to spare just two days if you want to find out more about drug discovery. From target identification, validation and lead optimisation to commercial issues such as intellectual property, we have it all! So book your diaries now for SMi’s Drug Discovery conference on 26- 27 November in London.

This event will address the developments and advances in drug discovery research, which have led to revolutionary advances throughout science and industry. The conference will focus on amongst other issues:

· Technologies and organisational tools of drug discovery. · How to overcome hurdles of speeding up the drug discovery process. · Technological advances · Partnering & alliances for effective product development & strategy.

What’s more there will be plenty of opportunities to network with leaders in the fields of genomics, drug discovery and emerging technologies. The conference offers you an insight into the novel developments in the drug discovery, and to analyse the future of these sectors within the drug development process.

Some of the key speakers include:

· Dr David Langley, Compound Management Department, Discovery Research, GlaxoSmithKline · Dr Jutta Heim, Vice President, Senior Scientific Expert, Molecular Biology, Novartis · Dr Wilma Keighley, Manager, Laboratory Automation Group, Medicinal Technolgies, Pfizer · Dr Ann Fowler, Senior Scientist, AstraZeneca · Dr Serge Hazaly, Head, Chemistry, Serono Pharmaceutical Research Institute · Dr Sandra Glucksmann, Senior Director, Millenium Pharmaceuticals · Dr Yihan Wang, Staff Scientist, ARIAD Pharmaceuticals · Dr John Houston, Vice President, Applied Biotechnology, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

To be confirmed

To be confirmed, ,

9:10 POTENTIAL OF PHARMACOGENETICS IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY

Dr Ian Purvis

Dr Ian Purvis, Director, Discovery Genetics, Europe, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Importance of genomics for drug discovery
  • Target selection strategies
  • Applications of genomic technology
  • Impact on the drug discovery process
  • Arising opportunities
  • Evaluating the potential
  • 9:40 PLATFORM TECHNOLOGIES

    Dr Dominik Escher

    Dr Dominik Escher, Chief Executive Officer, ESBATech

  • Functional cellular screens versus in vitro approach
  • Which cellular system is applicable for target gene identification?
  • Yeast as a model system
  • Combining target identification and validation
  • Developing cellular systems from target identification to lead identification
  • 10:20 VISUALISATION METHODOLOGY

    Dr Hartmut Voss

    Dr Hartmut Voss, Vice President, Genomics, LION Biosciences

  • From information overload to overview
  • Visualisation of genomic data
  • Comparative genomics of pharma relevant model organisms
  • The ‘Targetome’: Data-mining and visualisation
  • Intergrating functional genomics, proteomics and pharmacogenomics data
  • Genomic data and the future
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE ROLE OF PLATFORM TECHNOLOGIES IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Jutta Heim

    Dr Jutta Heim, Vice President, Senior Scientific Expert, Molecular Biology, Novartis

  • Target platforms
  • Biological platforms
  • Industrial scale technology platforms
  • Synergies and economy of scale
  • Potential for collaborations, alliances and outsourcing
  • 12:00 BIOLOGICAL IMPERATIVES IN TARGET VALIDATION

    Dr Chris Mundy

    Dr Chris Mundy, Head, Gene Discovery, Oxford BioMedica

  • Reduction of attrition: when is target validation really valid?
  • Maximising both throughput and accuracy
  • The use of focused transgenesis for target validation in vitro and in vivo
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 BEYOND GENOMICS AND PROTEOMICS

    Dr Mark Treherne

    Dr Mark Treherne, Commercial Director, Biofocus

  • Using Family Activity Relationships to design drugs for key gene families
  • This novel approach will be illustrated with examples from the G-protein coupled receptor family
  • The approach combines information derived from protein structure and mutagenesis to design drug-like compound libraries
  • The impact of this approach on the drug discovery process will be discussed
  • 14:20 INFORMATION AGGREGATION, INTEGRATION AND CONVERSION INTO KNOWLEDGE

    Dr Julie Barnes

    Dr Julie Barnes, Director of Life Sciences, BioWisdom

  • The breadth of information requirements for drug discovery scientists today.
  • How drug discovery scientists access the information they require?
  • The need for information integration and standard nomenclature.
  • The need for ontological systems providing a framework for categorising information.
  • The challenges facing the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, in terms of increasing need to collaborate.
  • 15:00 The use of proteomic techniques for target discovery/selection and compound profiling

    Dr Jasbinder Sanghera

    Dr Jasbinder Sanghera, Chief Scientific Officer, Kinetek Pharmaceuticals

  • Tracking signaling proteins in various models of disease
  • Understanding functionality of signaling proteins is crucial
  • Enrichment is required to enhance the signal
  • Evaluating protein phosphorylation of various proteins
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 COHERENT SYNTHESIS(TM)

    Anders Qvarnstrom

    Anders Qvarnstrom, VP Marketing & Business Development, Personal Chemistry, Sweden

    16:40 APPLICATION OF IN SILICO FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS

    Dr Kerstin Klein

    Dr Kerstin Klein, Product Manager, GeneData

  • Technology specific data quality assessment
  • Integration of genome sequence and gene expression analysis
  • Whole genome sequence analysis to define specific anti-bacterial targets
  • Genomic scale gene expression profiling
  • Mode of action studies to validate drug development candidates
  • 17:10 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr David Langley

    Dr David Langley, Compound Management Department, Discovery Research, GlaxoSmithKline

    9:10 APPLICATION OF GENOMICS TECHNOLOGIES IN THE TARGET AND DRUG DISCOVERY PROCESS

    Dr Sandra Glucksmann

    Dr Sandra Glucksmann, Senior Director, Millennium Pharmaceuticals

  • Target by class computational and biological annotation
  • Pathway mining
  • Chemicogenomics
  • Toxiogenomics
  • 9:40 RAPID TARGET VALIDATION IN MODEL ORGANISMS

    Peter Lamb

    Peter Lamb, Senior Director, Molecular Pharmacology & Structural Biology, Exelixis

  • Target identification in model organisms
  • Validation of targets and pathways
  • Target validation in multiple diseases
  • Rapid advancement of targets into drug discovery
  • Flexible lead ID and optimisation strategies
  • 10:20 TARGET VALIDATION USING ZINC FINGER PROTEINS (ZFPs)

    Dr Yen Choo

    Dr Yen Choo, Vice President, Research, Sangamo Biosciences

  • Gene-specific transcription factors made-to-measure using ZFPs
  • Both up and down-regulation of specific target gene expression
  • Inducible phenotypes in engineered cell lines
  • Rapid construction of ZFP-transgenic animals
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY IN DRUG DISCOVERY TODAY

    Dr Serge Halazy

    Dr Serge Halazy, Head, Chemistry, Serono Pharmaceuticals

  • What are the new challenges for medicinal chemists?
  • Target validation with chemical genomics
  • Optimising leads: a knowledge-based story
  • Chemical diversity and rationale design: friends or foes?
  • ADME/Tox: from predictions to experimental data
  • From combichem to scale-up
  • 12:00 WHY AUTOMATE?

    Dr Wilma Keighley

    Dr Wilma Keighley, Manager, Laboratory Automation Group, Medicinal Technologies, Pfizer

  • Automated technologies transforming drug discovery
  • Automated sample preparation
  • Automated screening
  • Automated data handling
  • Automation solutions for the future
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 ARE WE GETTING THE CHEMICAL INPUT TO HTS RIGHT?

    Dr David Langley

    Dr David Langley, Compound Management Department, Discovery Research, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Compound collections are not screening collections
  • Options for improving the screening collection
  • Developments in compound selection and exclusion criteria
  • Balancing external compound opportunities with internal resources
  • Selecting compounds for screenng
  • Is it all down to numbers?
  • 14:40 TARGET IDENTIFICATION/ VALIDATION

    Dr Thierry Bogaert

    Dr Thierry Bogaert, Chief Executive Officer, Devgen

  • C.elegans assays as a model for human diseases
  • State-of-the-art genetic tools to identify the function of all genes in the genome
  • Validated targets are druggable and therapeutically relevant
  • Screening of high value targets requiring an in vivo biological context to function
  • In vitro and in vivo high throughput screening assays
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 REDUCING EXPERIMENTAL ARTEFACTS IN HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING

    Dr Ann Fowler

    Dr Ann Fowler, Senior Scientist, AstraZeneca

  • Costs and implications of experimental artefacts in HTS
  • Sources of interference in HTS assays
  • Strategies to reduce these effects including: Changes to screening processes IT solutions Novel assay formats/detection technologies
  • 16:20 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ISSUES

    Robert Anderson

    Robert Anderson, Partner, Lovells

  • Why is intellectual property important?
  • Patents for new technologies
  • Bio-informatics
  • Is the patent system keeping pace with the needs of the industry?
  • Enforcing your rights
  • Practical steps to protect your investment
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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