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Identifying potential therapeutic drug targets and validating their suitability is a complex process involving numerous experimental platforms, including DNA sequence analysis. Since its introduction in 2005 next-generation sequencing (NGS) has fundamentally altered genomics research. Large knowledge-gaining experiments are in progress that were financially unjustifiable or even impossible five years ago. These include metagenomics to compare different disease states or patient variablility, genome sequencing of model and pathogenic species or ELT compound library screening techniques.

NGS is now successfully utilised by biopharmaceutical companies from the earliest stages of drug discovery to provide detailed genomic data and clinical applications are now emerging. These range from investigating the molecular basis of drug resistance and planning antimicrobial regimens, to vaccine development and disease diagnostics. In the rapidly growing field of personalised medicine, eight percent of medicines now have a biomarker or stratified element as compared to just a few percent five years ago.

As sequencing costs continue to fall, the future will see even faster identification of responders and non-responders, benefiting patients, prescribers and payors.

Production for the event is now underway. To discuss the progam or speak at the meeting please contact smiproduction@smi-online.co.uk

For sponsorship and exhibition opportunities please contact amalick@smi-online.co.uk 

Join us for two days of insights and case studies from leading experts and industry executives, enabling you to:

  • Generate longer nucleic acid and oligonucleotide sequences of higher quality
  • Increase consensus accuracy and genome coverage
  • Maximise the alignment and assembly of NGS reads with reference sequences
  • Enhance signal-to-noise measurements in real-time sequencing
  • Utilise exomics to elucidate gene families implicated in disease or pharmacogenetic effects
  • Improve mapping in repetitive regions when resequencing
  • Catalogue the transcriptomes of cells, tissues and pathogens
  • Perform quantitative applications more effectively with third generation platforms
  • Clarify analysis requirements prior to epigenomic studies

Presidents, Chief Executive Officers, Chief Scientific Officers, Chief Technology Officers, Chief Operating Officers, Vice Presidents, Directors, Professors, Heads, Program Managers and Team Leaders in:

  • Genomics
  • Genome Sequencing
  • Sequencing Technology
  • Bioinformatics
  • Computational Biology
  • Medical Genetics
  • Clinical Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Oncology
  • Clinical Research & Development
  • Translational Medicine
  • Stratified Medicine / Personalised Medicine
  • Strategic Alliances
  • Business Development

Asia Information Services Ltd.; Astrazeneca; AstraZeneca PLC; Baringa Partners; Catalent Pharma Solutions Inc; Cisco Systems; Dongfang Co.; DSP BlackRock Investment Managers Pvt Ltd; Eurofins Scientific Inc; Exploratory Development; Gen-Probe Incorporated; Green Bay Packers; KordaMentha; M E R Inc; PA Consulting Group; Pfizer Inc; Plus - Quam Servicios De Sequridad S A; Quintiles Transnational Corp.; Ricerca Biosciences , LLC; Roche; Sophos; Spark & Cannon; Teecware; The Hong Kong Jockey Club; The Surgery; Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.; Wisconsin Department of Tourism;

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Patrik Kolar

Patrik Kolar, Head of Unit – Personalised Medicine, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation , European Commission

David Williams

David Williams, Chief Executive Officer, Discuva

9:10 Next-generation DNA sequencing techniques and applications

Wilhelm Ansorge

Wilhelm Ansorge, Visiting Professor, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

  • Next-generation DNA sequencing techniques are opening fascinating opportunities in the life sciences
  • Commercially available DNA sequencing platforms
  • Single-molecule real-time methods, and conventional and graphene nanopore technologies
  • New techniques in development and biomedical applications
  • 9:45 Cutting edge developments in next-generation sequencing technologies

    Michael Quail

    Michael Quail, Team Leader, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

  • Improving our Illumina library-preparation methods
  • Reducing contaminating human DNA in pathogen sequencing
  • Mapping transposon insertion sites
  • Direct strand-selective RNA sequencing
  • A new protocol for long-insert (mate-pair) sequencing
  • 10:20 Making sense of next-generation sequencing data

    Lachlan Coin

    Lachlan Coin, Senior Lecturer in Statistical Genomics, Imperial College

  • Generating the species pan-genome
  • Catalogue variation in populations and associating these with traits
  • Techniques for detecting and genotyping variation at the population level, including copy number variation and indels
  • Increasing sensitivity and decreasing false discovery rates
  • Applications to polyploidy  as well as diploid organisms
  • 10:55 Morning Coffee

    11:15 Overcoming common challenges of RNA-Seq data analysis

    Matthias  Prucha

    Matthias Prucha, Business Development Manager Europe, Partek Inc

  • Manage the huge data
  • Use powerful and flexible analysis tools
  • Apply statistics to get most from your data
  • 11:30 Use of next generation sequencing for the identification of novel cancer targets

    Roy Bicknell

    Roy Bicknell, Professor of Cancer Biology and Genomics, University of Birmingham

  • Complementarity of NGS with other genomics technologies
  • Current limitations of NGS in the context of target identification
  • Impact of results from NGS on the direction of cancer research
  • 12:05 R&D of antibiotics- begin with the end in mind

    Richard Bax

    Richard Bax, Senior Partner, TranScrip Partners

  • Identify targets and then identify druggable targets
  • Importance of whole cell assays and medicinal chemistry
  • Outline toxicology and animal pharmacology
  • PK/PD predictors of outcome
  • Importance of phase I and proof-of-concept studies
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 Antibacterial mechanism discovery using next-generation sequencing

    Nicholas Murgolo

    Nicholas Murgolo, Lead, Infectious Diseases, Merck Research Laboratories

  • Strain comparison methods for target discovery
  • Barcode strategy for simultaneous sequencing multiple samples
  • Genome coverage requirements for variant detection
  • Variant detection methods
  • 14:15 The role of NGS in the discovery of novel peptide antibiotics

    Mat Upton

    Mat Upton, Senior Lecturer In Medical Microbiology, Manchester University

  • Peptide antibiotics are promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics
  • NGS has revolutionised progression of natural product screening programmes where laborious reverse genetic approaches are now being replaced by genome sequence determination
  • Innovative search tools now allow rapid in silico screening of bacterial genomes for potentially useful new antimicrobial peptides
  • 14:50 Next-generation sequencing of mixed bacterial populations

    Lori Snyder

    Lori Snyder, Reader in Biotechnology, Kingston University

  • Interpretation of complex data sets
  • Identifying mixed populations in a pure culture
  • Understanding the mechanisms of genomic changes
  • 15:25 Afternoon Tea

    15:45 Scaling-up sequencing projects in the hunt for new antibiotics

    Lisa Crossman

    Lisa Crossman, Microbial Genomes Project Leader, The Genome Analysis Centre

  • Exploiting new environmental niches
  • Technical challenges in next generation deep re-sequencing
  • Genetics of antibiotic biosynthesis from fungus-farming ant-associated species
  • High throughput genome scanning of Streptomyces
  • 16:20 Panel discussion: Next-generation sequencing- where are we and what are the prospects for the future?

    Panelists will discuss "user-friendly" interfaces for annotating and analysing genome sequences, and exploiting this data in disease aetiology, diagnostic microbiology and drug discovery.  Second and third generation technologies, library preparation, and assessing copy number and repeat variation on gene expression and disease susceptibility, will also be discussed.

    Nicholas Murgolo

    Nicholas Murgolo, Lead, Infectious Diseases, Merck Research Laboratories

    Michael Quail

    Michael Quail, Team Leader, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

    Guy Barker

    Guy Barker, Director, Genomics Resource Centre, University of Warwick

    Roy Bicknell

    Roy Bicknell, Professor of Cancer Biology and Genomics, University of Birmingham

    Richard Bax

    Richard Bax, Senior Partner, TranScrip Partners

    16:55 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    Patrik Kolar

    Patrik Kolar, Head of Unit – Personalised Medicine, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation , European Commission

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Elia Stupka

    Elia Stupka, Co-Director and Head of Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute

    9:10 Interpreting functional genomic data using integrative analyses and network models for drug target discovery

    Ben Sidders

    Ben Sidders, Principal Scientist, Bioinformatician, Pfizer Ltd

  • Moving beyond big datasets to uncover disease relevant biology
  • Benefits of using existing data and interpreting new data in that context
  • Benefits of integrating disparate data into a single model
  • Strategies for target selection from such models
  • 9:50 Public NGS data repositories: services and sustainability through data compression

    Guy Cochrane

    Guy Cochrane, Head of European Nucleotide Archive, European Bioinformatics Institute

  • Data repositories operated by the European Bioinformatics Institute
  • Services provided by these repositories
  • Development of sequence data compression under the CRAM framework
  • Choices to be made in lossy compression
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 Do we understand enough about genomes to build next generation molecular networks of disease?

    Elia Stupka

    Elia Stupka, Co-Director and Head of Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute

  • Using genomics to unravel the predisposition and progression of pathologies
  • Limitations of GWAS and SNP microarrays in understanding the heritability of disease
  • NGS  offers a unified view of molecular networks underlying disease states
  • 11:30 Genomic biomarkers discovery in Duchenne muscular dystrophies using whole exome sequencing and targeted resequencing: a novel approach based on candidate prioritised genes

    Alessandra Ferlini

    Alessandra Ferlini, Associate Professor, University of Ferrara

  • Dystrophin
  • Susceptibility SNPs
  • Candidate genes
  • Drug response
  • SNP grouping
  • 11:55 Identifying genomic pre-clinical biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients trough whole exome sequencing

    Irina Zaharieva

    Irina Zaharieva, Research Associate, UCL Institute of Child Health

  • Genetic profiling of DMD patients to identify biomarkers, prediction of disease progression and improved therapeutics
  • Genetic variants influencing differences in phenotype between DMD patients
  • Whole exome sequencing and capture to identify variants underling disease variability
  • Identification and validation of disease-progression-specific variants
  • 12:20 Identifying prognostic biomarker candidates in neuromuscular dystrophies using antibody suspension bead arrays

    Cristina Al-Khalili Szigyarto

    Cristina Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Scientific Coordinator, Royal Institute of Technology

  • Disease progression in muscular dystrophies
  • Protein profiling of plasma and serum using antibody-based suspension bead arrays
  • Identification of potential biomarkers for monitoring long-term disease progression
  • 12:45 Networking Lunch

    13:45 NGS revelations in shRNA maturation and siRNA mode of action mechanisms targeting the hepatitis C virus (HCV)

    Sterghios Moschos

    Sterghios Moschos, Reader in Industrial Biotechnology, University of Westminster

  • How to implement NGS in shRNA maturation analysis and siRNA mode of action studies
  • Approaches to analysing and interpreting this type of NGS data
  • Case study on a HCV-targeting siRNA therapeutic
  • 14:25 Minor variant detection in hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency (HIV) viral populations using 454 and Illumina sequencing technologies

    Joke Reumers

    Joke Reumers, Bioinformatics Scientist, Janssen Infectious Diseases - Diagnostics

  • Comparison of mapping algorithms for deep sequencing applications
  • Error profiles of 454 and Illumina platforms
  • Distinguishing sequencing errors from true low frequency variants
  • How deep can we reliably sequence using 454 and Illumina technologies?
  • 15:05 Afternoon Tea

    15:25 Enhancing antibody discovery using next-generation sequencing

    Gerard  Didelot

    Gerard Didelot, Research Scientist, Novimmune

    In vitro antibody discovery involves large collections of variants that can be characterized by NGS
    Classical antibody screening can be replaced or complemented by in silico antibody discovery
    Additional candidates missed during screening approaches can be identified
    Dedicated software for antibody analysis has been developed

    16:05 NGS sequencing of T and B cell repertoire: applications in biomarker discovery, vaccine evaluation, and personalised treatment

    Jian Han

    Jian Han, Faculty Investigator, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

  • Semi-quantitative and inclusive amplification of T and B cell repertoires from peripheral blood or other tissues
  • Free online software developed for data clean-up, barcode separation (of pooled samples), CDR3 distribution, VDJ usage, and diversity index (D50) calculations
  • Early studies show cancer patients associated with decreased diversity (lower D50 values) and also share some disease specific CDR3 sequences
  • R10K (www.R10K.org): a non-profit, international collaboration, to sequence 10,000 samples and study 100 diseases.  Initial results
  • 16:45 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

    +

    FEATURED SPEAKERS

    Ben Sidders

    Ben Sidders

    Principal Scientist, Bioinformatician, Pfizer Ltd
    Guy Cochrane

    Guy Cochrane

    Head of European Nucleotide Archive, European Bioinformatics Institute
    Joke Reumers

    Joke Reumers

    Bioinformatics Scientist, Janssen Infectious Diseases - Diagnostics
    Lisa Crossman

    Lisa Crossman

    Microbial Genomes Project Leader, The Genome Analysis Centre
    Matthias  Prucha

    Matthias Prucha

    Business Development Manager Europe, Partek Inc
    Michael Quail

    Michael Quail

    Team Leader, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
    Nicholas Murgolo

    Nicholas Murgolo

    Lead, Infectious Diseases, Merck Research Laboratories

    Alessandra Ferlini

    Associate Professor, University of Ferrara
    Alessandra Ferlini

    Ben Sidders

    Principal Scientist, Bioinformatician, Pfizer Ltd
    Ben Sidders

    Cristina Al-Khalili Szigyarto

    Scientific Coordinator, Royal Institute of Technology
    Cristina Al-Khalili Szigyarto

    David Williams

    Chief Executive Officer, Discuva
    David Williams

    Elia Stupka

    Co-Director and Head of Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute
    Elia Stupka

    Gerard Didelot

    Research Scientist, Novimmune
    Gerard  Didelot

    Guy Cochrane

    Head of European Nucleotide Archive, European Bioinformatics Institute
    Guy Cochrane

    Irina Zaharieva

    Research Associate, UCL Institute of Child Health
    Irina Zaharieva

    Jian Han

    Faculty Investigator, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
    Jian Han

    Joke Reumers

    Bioinformatics Scientist, Janssen Infectious Diseases - Diagnostics
    Joke Reumers

    Lachlan Coin

    Senior Lecturer in Statistical Genomics, Imperial College
    Lachlan Coin

    Lisa Crossman

    Microbial Genomes Project Leader, The Genome Analysis Centre
    Lisa Crossman

    Lori Snyder

    Reader in Biotechnology, Kingston University
    Lori Snyder

    Mat Upton

    Senior Lecturer In Medical Microbiology, Manchester University
    Mat Upton

    Matthias Prucha

    Business Development Manager Europe, Partek Inc
    Matthias  Prucha

    Michael Quail

    Team Leader, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
    Michael Quail

    Nicholas Murgolo

    Lead, Infectious Diseases, Merck Research Laboratories
    Nicholas Murgolo

    Patrik Kolar

    Head of Unit – Personalised Medicine, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation , European Commission
    Patrik Kolar

    Richard Bax

    Senior Partner, TranScrip Partners
    Richard Bax

    Roy Bicknell

    Professor of Cancer Biology and Genomics, University of Birmingham
    Roy Bicknell

    Sterghios Moschos

    Reader in Industrial Biotechnology, University of Westminster
    Sterghios Moschos

    Wilhelm Ansorge

    Visiting Professor, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
    Wilhelm Ansorge

    Workshops

    RNA-sequencing – analytical challenges and data interpretation
    Workshop

    RNA-sequencing – analytical challenges and data interpretation

    Copthorne Tara Hotel
    19th September 2012
    London, United Kingdom

    Challenges in bacterial genome sequence data interpretation
    Workshop

    Challenges in bacterial genome sequence data interpretation

    Copthorne Tara Hotel
    19th September 2012
    London, United Kingdom

    VENUE

    Copthorne Tara Hotel

    Scarsdale Place, Kensington, London, United Kingdom

    The Copthorne Tara Hotel London Kensington is an elegant contemporary four-star hotel in prestigious Kensington, located just a two minutes walk from High Street Kensington underground station, making exploring easy. The hotel offers well-appointed and comfortable guest rooms combining Standard, Superior and Club accommodation. Club rooms offer iconic views over the city and include Club Lounge access for complimentary breakfast and refreshments. Guests can sample the authentic Singaporean, Malaysian and Chinese cuisine at Bugis Street, traditional pub fare at the Brasserie Restaurant & Bar or relax with a delicious drink at West8 Cocktail Lounge & Bar.

    The Copthorne Tara Hotel boasts 745 square meters of flexible meeting space, consisting of the Shannon Suite and the Liffey Suite, ideal for hosting conferences, weddings and social events. Facilities include access to the business centre 24 hours a day, fully equipped fitness room, gift shop, theatre desk and Bureau de Change. With ample onsite parking outside the London congestion charge zone and excellent transport links via Heathrow Airport, the hotel is the perfect location for business or leisure stays. The hotel is within close proximity to the shops of High Street Kensington, Knightsbridge and Westfield London, Olympia Conference Centre, Royal Albert Hall, Kensington Palace and Hyde Park.

     

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    Copthorne Tara Hotel

    Scarsdale Place
    Kensington
    London W8 5SR
    United Kingdom

    Copthorne Tara Hotel

    The Copthorne Tara Hotel London Kensington is an elegant contemporary four-star hotel in prestigious Kensington, located just a two minutes walk from High Street Kensington underground station, making exploring easy. The hotel offers well-appointed and comfortable guest rooms combining Standard, Superior and Club accommodation. Club rooms offer iconic views over the city and include Club Lounge access for complimentary breakfast and refreshments. Guests can sample the authentic Singaporean, Malaysian and Chinese cuisine at Bugis Street, traditional pub fare at the Brasserie Restaurant & Bar or relax with a delicious drink at West8 Cocktail Lounge & Bar.

    The Copthorne Tara Hotel boasts 745 square meters of flexible meeting space, consisting of the Shannon Suite and the Liffey Suite, ideal for hosting conferences, weddings and social events. Facilities include access to the business centre 24 hours a day, fully equipped fitness room, gift shop, theatre desk and Bureau de Change. With ample onsite parking outside the London congestion charge zone and excellent transport links via Heathrow Airport, the hotel is the perfect location for business or leisure stays. The hotel is within close proximity to the shops of High Street Kensington, Knightsbridge and Westfield London, Olympia Conference Centre, Royal Albert Hall, Kensington Palace and Hyde Park.

     

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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