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Technology Commercialisation: Developing Biotech Start-Ups

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:10 CHAIRMAN'S OPENING PRESENTATION

 Dimitri F Dimitriou

Dimitri F Dimitriou, Senior Director, Worldwide Business Development, GlaxoSmithKline

  •  Financing trends in the biotech sector
  •  Creating opportunities in life sciences
  •  Collaborations: the lifeblood of biotechs
  • 9:40 REVIEWING THE TECHNICAL AND COMMERCIAL ASSESSMENT OF DEVELOPMENT STAGE TECHNOLOGIES

    Adam Raman

    Adam Raman, Director, Strategy Development, PHASE II International

  •  Strategic needs of emerging companies: from set up to launch
  •  Assessing scientific innovation vs generating financial forecasts: critique valuation methods
  •  Developing the need for a technology valuation scoring system
  •  Understanding the individual needs of various stakeholders
  •  Developing communication strategies targeted to the different needs of stakeholders
  • 10:20 IS YOUR MOLECULE READY TO MARKET OR PARTNER?

     Mark A King

    Mark A King, Managing Director, Kendall Strategies

  •  Historically, the pharma and biotech industries have focused on the NDA, not the market, when designing clinical programs
  •  This myopia often resulted in unnecessary marketing limitations due to an unnecessarily restrictive label
  •  This presentation will discuss new strategies for evaluating drug candidates and their markets in order to realise a molecule’s full potential either in the market or in a partnering deal
  •  One or more case studies will be presented
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 COMMERCIALISING A LEAD CANCER PRODUCT

     Dr Elma S Hawkins

    Dr Elma S Hawkins, Vice Chairman, Antigenics

  •  Developing an integrated infrastructure to develop and commercialise Oncophage®
  •  Expanding the clinical development programme
  •  Building a sales force prior to commercialisation
  •  Creating value through prudent funding strategies
  • 12:00 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

     Glynn Edwards

    Glynn Edwards, Chief Executive Officer, Antisoma

  •  Why transfer technology from universities?
  •  Recognising the commercial implications of academic discoveries
  •  What are the stages of technology transfer and commercialisation?
  •  What are the options for technology commercialisation from academia? Established companies, start-ups or spin-offs?
  •  Bringing science and commercial groups together
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 COMMERCIALISING TECHNOLOGY FROM ACADEMIA

     Prof Howard Stevens

    Prof Howard Stevens, Pfizer Professor of Exploratory Drug Delivery, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences,, University of Strathclyde, UK

  •  An industrialist links with academics
  •  An industrialist joins an academic spin-out
  •  From buy-out to acquisition to academic chair
  •  Start-up / spin-out of a service business
  •  Spin-out of a R&D business
  • 14:40 FROM ACADEMIA TO BIOTECH: A SUCCESS STORY

     Dr John Brown

    Dr John Brown, Chief Executive Officer, Acambis

  •  A brief history of Acambis
  •  From university to biotech: the stages of company development and technology  commercialisation
  •  Technology platforms for new vaccines
  •  Commercialising the technology
  •  Strengthening the financial position through alliances
  •  Focusing the portfolio  Maintaining a strategy for constant new product opportunities
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: THE HUMAN FACTOR

     Cynthia Larbey

    Cynthia Larbey, Managing Director, People in Health

  •  Understanding the stages and some of the issues involved
  •  Working toward speeding up the process from innovation to commercialisation
  •  What human skills are required for successful technology transfer?
  •  Finding the right teams
  •  Integrating the scientific and commercial teams
  •  Planning for success, some good and bad examples
  • 16:20 FROM THE LABORATORY TO THE MARKET-PLACE

     Dr Peter MacLennan

    Dr Peter MacLennan, Director of Business Development, Pharma-Transfer

  •  Historical perspective: what motivates scientists?
  •  The current situation: how do scientists link up with business?
  •  Geographical comparisons: US vs European culture
  •  Venture capital, biotechnology companies, big Pharma – an exploration of their different roles
  •  The future: where will we be in five years time?
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Networking Drinks Reception

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks Dr Nigel Parker, Chief Executive Officer, Ark Therapeutics

    9:40 RAISING FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR COMMERCIALISATION

     Stephanie Léouzon

    Stephanie Léouzon, Managing Director, Credit Suisse First Boston

  •  The new issue market and raising funds through initial public offering (IPO)
  •  Advantages and disadvantages of ‘going public’ for the biotech start-up
  •  Pros and cons of private placements
  •  Venture capital financing
  •  Trends in venture capital financing in the US and Europe  Qualitative and quantitative analyses of venture capital funding trends
  •  Advantages and disadvantages
  • 10:20 COMMERCIALISING A DRUG-DISCOVERY PROCESS IN ANTI-INFECTIVE RESEARCH

    Prof. Ken Powell

    Prof. Ken Powell, Chief Executive Officer, Arrow Therapeutics

  •  World leading science
  •  Strong management
  •  Clear business model
  •  Broad product portfolio
  •  Supportive investors
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 RISK MANAGEMENT AND BARRIERS TO COMMERCIALISATION

     Dr Stephen Castle

    Dr Stephen Castle, Managing Director, Mattson Jack Group-Europe

  •  Does biotechnology involve such high-risks?
  •  Understanding barriers
  •  Understanding risks
  •  Strategies to overcome barriers and manage risks
  •  Developing a successful commercialisation strategy acknowledging risk and barriers
  • 12:00 M&A AS A STRATEGY FOR COMMERCIALISATION

     Geoff Collett

    Geoff Collett, Vice President, Corporate Development, Lorus Therapeutics

  •  Facing the harsh imperative of M&A
  •  Ambitious business models required for a new era
  •  Acquisition of critical mass
  •  Diversification of development risk
  •  Capabilities versus cash
  •  Maximising valuation and providing liquidity options to shareholders
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 THE IMPACT OF PHARMACOGENOMICS ON DRUG DISCOVERY, DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALISATION

     Dr Bruce L Maloff

    Dr Bruce L Maloff, Executive Vice President, Commercial Operations, Variagenics

  •  Overcoming ‘pharmacogenomicsophobia’
  •  Attuning drug development to genetic variability
  •  Targeting blockbusters and eliminating non-responders
  •  Making pharmacogenomics happen
  •  Changing the diagnostics paradigm
  •  Healthcare impact
  • 14:40 IMPLEMENTING DECISION ANALYSIS IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL ARENA

     Dr Steven Kuemmerle

    Dr Steven Kuemmerle, Director, Decision Support Group, Abbott Laboratories

  •  A brief history of decision analysis (DA) and its application to R&D intensive enterprises
  •  A review of the application of DA to problems in pharmaceutical development
  •  How to assess development risk, commercial return and produce high quality decisions
  •  Case study:
  •  How DA was implemented at Abbott
  •  How Abbott uses DA in pharma development
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

     David Best

    David Best, Chairman, Medical Marketing International Group

  •  Pharmaceutical market consolidation
  •  The needs of academia
  •  The MMI model
  •  Strategic alliances
  •  The investor’s view
  • 16:20 STRATEGIES, NEED AND IMPACT OF HIGH QUALITY COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY ON DRUG DISCOVERY CAPABILITIES OF THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY IN THE POST-GENOMICS ERA

     Dr Kumar G Gadamasetti

    Dr Kumar G Gadamasetti, Senior Director, ChemRx Advanced Technologies [Discovery Partners International]

  •  Augment the internal drug discovery capabilities of pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies
  •  Broaden and deepen our technology through internal inventions, acquisitions, multiple revenue streams and expand our knowledge base
  •  Understand what business partners want
  •  A clear pathway from research ideas to high quality products
  •  Fully integrated chemistry platform
  •  Good combinatorial libraries come from good science
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    9:10 EARLY STAGE FUNDING

     Antony Ross

    Antony Ross, Director, Healthcare, 3i Group

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    Managing Uncertainty
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    Managing Uncertainty

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    23rd May 2001
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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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